eve tempted

Decoding the Biblical Narrative of Mother!

As I left the theater Friday night after the showing of Darren Aronofsky’s Mother!, an older woman turned to me, looking as baffled as I was, and said, “Well, we got through it.”  It was an understandable sentiment.  The movie is bizarre and overwrought and disturbing.  It makes no attempt to explain itself.  Aronofsky puts a lot of faith in the audience to put in the effort to decode it.  I suspect there will be two types of viewers of this film: those who leave the theater confused and kind of peeved and write the movie off as a forgettable romp in narcissistic arthouse theater; and those who become infected by the film’s sheer mystery.  

If I’m being totally honest, I must say that I pretty much gave up on decoding Mother! a few hours after seeing it.  I suspected it was saying something about the life of the artist and its inherent selfishness, but my interpretation was murky at best.  And then, as luck would have it, as I laid down to sleep, it hit me, seemingly at once: the whole film is an incredibly compressed retelling of the Bible.  Or, at the very least, its action mirrors that of the Bible.  

What follows is a rough attempt to break down how key scenes in Mother! reflect stories of the Bible, which hopefully will help foster a greater understanding of the movie’s central themes of creation, destruction, neglect, and obsession.    

As you could have guessed, Javier Bardem’s character represents God, although he is far from benevolent.  In my opinion, Jennifer Lawrence’s character represents a kind of Mother Nature figure. She is the one working on the house, which symbolically represents the earth, and she loves her work.  She is the one creating the physical beauty of the world, and she wants the chance to enjoy it.  But before she gets a chance, a stranger (Ed Harris) enters her world.  This stranger is Adam, the first man.  Bardem welcomes Adam into his home, who turns out to be a huge fan of Bardem’s poetry—in fact, Adam nearly worships him.  Bardem gives Adam a tour of his office, where he shows Adam his weird glowing crystal.  Adam is drawn to it and reaches to touch it, but Bardem forbids him to (forbid being the operative word here if you catch my meaning).  That night Mother finds Bardem comforting Adam as he vomits into the toilet.  She catches a brief glimpse of a wound on his rib cage which Bardem quickly covers with his hand. The next day, Eve arrives, having been fashioned out of Adam’s rib during the night.  

Now there’s that scene with the toilet. Mother discovers a strange, um, organism hanging out in it that quickly vanishes down the drain.  I cannot say with any certainty, but I believe this creature might be the serpent that tempts Eve.  We don’t see it again, so the temptation itself must take place offscreen, but nonetheless, this scene is an unsettling hint at the corruption to come. Soon after, Adam and Eve are found in Bardem’s office, where they have touched and shattered his glowing crystal.  Bardem with all the fury of the Old-Testament God banishes them from the office and boards it up, just as God banishes Adam and Eve from Eden and hides the Tree of Life.  By the way, the Tree of Life in the Bible is the source of eternal life; in Mother! the crystal is what allows Bardem to reset time and seemingly live forever.

Enter Cain and Abel, who quickly play out their murder scene, but with a doorknob as the weapon of choice instead of a rock. I believe it is after this scene (but a re-watch is required to validate this) that we first see the “heart of the house” show signs of corruption.  The fall of Adam and Eve along with this first act of violence pave the way for the film’s staggering and increasingly fanatic third act.  I’d say it begins during the wake sequence after the sink falls apart and water rains down from the heavens—excuse me, I mean sprays out from the pipes—resulting in a Great Flood that finally gets Bardem to kick his unruly houseguests out.  

Then Mother gets pregnant and Bardem publishes a best-selling book of verse.  The press shows up at his house, along with pretty much the rest of the world, and all hell gradually breaks loose.  The guests worship Bardem and greedily grab whatever they can find of his to worship as, you guessed it, idols.  Sin wreaks havoc and the house goes full-on Sodom.  The imagery that follows is so densely packed that I can’t pretend to have caught it all, but I imagine all sorts of Biblical allusions find their way into the scene.  

Mother is on the verge of giving birth and Bardem helps her find a quiet place to do so. The guests send in gifts, and while there aren’t any stand-ins for the three kings, you get the picture: its Jesus, folks.  Bardem’s first thought is that he must show his followers his son, and when he does, they hastily devour him.  After witnessing this, Bardem comes to a very Christ-like conclusion:  “His death must not have been for nothing,” he tells Mother. “We must forgive them.”  This he says, by the way, while his followers are still chewing on his newborn baby’s flesh.  Communion anyone?

 Finally, Mother cracks and sets the house ablaze in a giant ball of fire, not unlike the kind God rains down on Sodom in the OT. An unscathed Bardem walks out of the ashes holding a well-burnt but still breathing Mother, rips her heart out of her chest, and uncovers a new glowing crystal inside, which he uses to reset time to live out the events again but with a brand-new Mother.

Whew.

That’s, at least, how the plot mirrors the Bible. I didn’t touch on what these parallels do for the film’s thematic material, but I’m too exhausted to delve into that right now.  In short, Aronofsky tells the untold story of the neglected Mother behind creation, which is also the story of the neglected muse behind the artist.  That’s a whole different post, though, and hopefully, I’ll get to it soon.

HAPPY LUNAR NEW YEAR 2017 

So it’s 1/1 New Year’s Eve according to the Lunar calendar, and since here at my place it’s kind of a big thing, here’s Sefikura wearing Vietnamese aodai LOL.

Btw, I just saw a post saying it’s the year of the Chocobo (aka year of the Chicken lol) but then you can say that it’s the year of the Cloud ahahaha.

Female Sexuality Awakens: The Heroine-Villain/Antihero Trope in Labyrinth and The Force Awakens

“Who is that man? The one staring at us? The nasty dog… He looks like he knows what I look like without my shimmy.” - Scarlett O’Hara about her first encounter with Rhett Butler, Gone With the Wind (1940).

Female protagonists have been paired romantically with “mad, bad, and dangerous to know” types since the beginning of and long before the advent of cinema. Although of chagrin to many “nice men” and socially concerned women, this ancient trope speaks to female desire as well as the deeply ingrained cultural idea that female sexual desire is dangerous. Ergo, the male character becomes an outward expression of that danger. For women who have been raised to fear their sexuality, the dangerous and seductive male character is a safe way in which to act out “dangerous” sexual desire. Next, the villain or antihero represents challenge and acts as a foil for personal growth and exploration within the heroine. Last, the villain/antihero is defeated and either banished or his inappropriate masculine power replaced with appropriate masculine power; this serves as a device for female empowerment. In this essay I shall support these assertions by drawing parallels between two modern fantasy movies. The first, 1986’s Labyrinth, features an overt heroine-villain romantic interest and the second, 2015’s Star Wars: The Force Awakens (hereafter referred to as The Force Awakens), features a foreshadowed heroine-villain turned antihero romantic arc. I shall also draw from psychology and classic literary and mythological tropes to bolster my examples.

Section I: The Maiden and the Frightening Unknown

We are often first introduced to our heroine, the young maiden who is presented in a childlike state, her sexuality unawakened. In Labyrinth, we meet Sarah who still plays with her “toys and costumes”. In The Force Awakens we meet Rey who, although living a difficult life on the brink of starvation, still retains a childlike quality in wearing a rebel pilot helmet and keeping a rebel pilot doll.

Sarah: 

Rey:

Most notably, both heroines are presented as young and inexperienced females who become frightened when the consequence of their action calls them to their hero’s journey.

Section II: Into the Woods and Spirited Away

In Labyrinth, Sarah wishes her baby brother, symbolic of her own childhood, away to the Goblin King and is frightened by the aftermath of goblins scampering about her parents’ bedroom (an apropos setting as adult sexuality would be frightening to childlike Sarah), popping in and out of drawers and out from under the bed. Thunder and lightening crash. After Jareth appears he spirits her away to his labyrinth, which is both surrounded and permeated by a glittering autumnal forest.

In The Force Awakens, Rey is called by the Skywalker legacy lightsaber. Touching the lightsaber induces a frightening vision in which she encounters the masked Kylo Ren. After the vision, the Wise Old Woman of the story, Maz Kanata, tells her that the belonging she seeks is not in whomever she is waiting for (her family) but ahead of her. Wanting nothing to do with her apparent destiny, she runs down the steps of Maz’s Castle into a forest where her next encounter with Kylo further frightens her. In her vision, Kylo appears twice as a masked man with a raised lightsaber (more on this in Section IV), the second appearance taking place in the snowy forest of Starkiller Base. When Rey actually encounters Kylo in the Takodana forest, he bridal carries her across the threshold of his ship and spirits her away to the underworld of Starkiller Base. (By the way, the bridal carry of a young woman by a monster or young man, and Kylo/Ben is both, means one of two things in stage: a villainous crush or foreshadowing romance, either immediate or distant future. I leave it to you to imply the narrative direction this trilogy is going.)

In fairy tales and mythology, Dark Forests or Enchanted Forests carry multiple meanings, among which are sexuality, the subconscious, mystery, and our primal selves. Most importantly, the forest represents a rite of passage. Red Riding Hood meets and defeats the Big Bad Wolf in the forest. Rama takes refuge in the forest for fourteen years before rescuing Sita. Snow White becomes lost and is eventually awoken with the Kiss of Life in the forest. Beauty chases her lost father into the forest only to find the Beast. Thus, into the forest Sarah and Rey go, for it is here where they must encounter their Shadow, Dark Side, or Subconscious and shine Light on it so that they can transform from childhood to adulthood, from unawakened to awakened.

Section III: Temptation Presents Itself or Enter Boy Trouble

In every hero’s journey, something or someone who turns the hero’s world upside down must enter the picture in order for the hero to develop. This is no different for our female protagonists, whose worlds are upturned by the arrival of the tempting male antagonist. Enter Boy Trouble.

Needless to say, there appear to be some commonalities in presentation. Both Jareth the Goblin King and Kylo Ren/Ben Organa-Solo wear black clothing, have sharp, angular features, and appear to spend an inordinate amount of time on hair maintenance. In personality, Jareth and Kylo are haughty, intelligent, and display dry or deadpan senses of humor. They are both magic (Force) users, men of power, and royalty with Jareth being King of the Goblins and Kylo being the son of Princess Leia Organa.

Most importantly, their initial shots serve to establish that the female protagonist is physically attracted to her dangerous but alluring antagonist. During their presenting shots, both men’s features are sexualized using make-up and and lighting, their less flattering features deemphasized, and both men are presented at flattering angles (for Kylo, this initial unmasking is arguably his most attractive shot in the film, followed closely by his close-ups with Rey during their lightsaber duel). Note both heroines appear taken aback and enchanted by their antagonists. Rey even gives Kylo “elevator eyes”, then pointedly looks away when he approaches, stealing not one but two glances back at him.

Sarah’s reaction to the appearance of the Goblin King:

Rey is captivated as Han Solo tells of “one boy” who destroyed Luke’s new generation of Jedi:

Rey’s reaction to Kylo’s unmasking:

The following point will be covered more in depth in Section IV, but it is appropriate to note in this section that during both initial presentations, serpent symbolism is employed. Jareth throws a snake at Sarah and when Kylo unmasks we hear a snake hiss and rattle. The serpent is an ancient trope; in the Garden of Eden the snake tempted Eve with the apple from the Tree of Knowledge. Snakes represent phallic imagery, deception, and temptation; all three ideas apply although Kylo’s deception (that he is a man rather than a creature) is only a deception from Rey’s perspective. (Without wading too deeply into the weeds here, the film strongly suggests Ben Organa-Solo is not a monster and has a forthcoming redemption arc.)

In addition, each antagonist is also a Death or Hades figure (Please make time to read Death and the Maiden by @ohtze for in-depth analysis). Jareth and Kylo, dressed in black and sweeping Sarah and Rey away to their respective representations of the Underworld, the Underground and Starkiller Base, represent the death of childhood innocence and the rebirth of mature sexuality.

Jareth spirits Sarah away to the Underground:

Kylo (Hades) bears Rey (Persephone) away to the depths of Starkiller Base (the Underworld) on his ship (chariot) led by four TIE fighters (horses):

Finally, both antagonists serve as empathetic foils for their respective heroine’s character development. Both antagonists have similarities with the heroine. Sarah is an intelligent bookworm; Jareth is witty and intelligent. Rey and Kylo engage in what has been affectionately dubbed by fans as The Nerd-Off, a subtle battle of wits that takes place during her interrogation. Rey begins reciting droid specifications and Kylo cuts her off, saying he needs a map it is carrying and going into unnecessary detail about having put together all the other pieces of the map by recovering them from the archives of the Empire. That’s right, One Boy just told What Girl he spends all his time in archives as a point of pride. In the novelization, he also lets her know that he too knows about general droid specifications (thank you very much). Mirror mirror on the wall, who’s the nerdiest of them all? Both antagonists also relate to the heroine’s loneliness and isolation. The Goblin King sings to Sarah lyrics such as “the lost and the lonely”, “there’s such a sad love deep in your eyes”, and “live without your sunlight, love without your heartbeat”. As Kylo reads Rey’s mind, his tone is soft and empathetic. “You’re so lonely. So afraid to leave. At night, desperate to sleep, you imagine an ocean. I see it. I see the island.”

Each protagonist and antagonist pair is presented as two sides of the same coin. While Sarah’s development lies in realizing that the world is not fair, a fact the Goblin King does not fail to remind her of on several occasions, Jareth too displays a haughty, entitled attitude. Kylo/Ben and Rey are presented in a more Yin and Yang manner. Kylo is typically shown as a rage-filled, selfish character (tantrum throwing and ultimately choosing to kill his father) with moments of compassion (letting Finn off the hook in the opening scene and attempting to interrogate Rey first in a non-invasive manner then empathizing with her loneliness and isolation). Rey is typically shown as a compassionate character (choosing BB-8’s well being over more food rations than she has likely ever seen before) with moments of sheer rage (slashing Kylo’s face after she has already disarmed him). In the case of Kylo/Ben, we can presume that Rey will also serve as a foil for his character development as he makes the transformation from Kylo Ren back to Ben Organa-Solo.

Section IV: Sometimes a Lightsaber Isn’t Just a Lightsaber

Remember that part in Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire that talks about the champions’ wands being flexible or rigid and whose wand was which length? Did you giggle at it? If so, then you did exactly what the author intended. Phallic imagery is purposely placed in literature and films, especially coming of age fantasies, as a signifier of potency, whether sexual or otherwise. Phallic imagery abounds in both Labyrinth and The Force Awakens. The following represent some of the phallic imagery present within both films.

Jareth warns Sarah, “Don’t defy me” then throws a snake at her:

Jareth and his cane:

Let’s not forget Jareth’s pants magic pants:

Hasn’t anyone told Kylo it’s bad manners to put your lightsaber in a stranger’s face?

I’m so not even kidding about this one. Check out the “tip” of his index finger. There you go. Now you can’t unsee it:

Note the positioning of the lightsaber as Kylo approaches the “girl he’s heard so much about”:

Thanks, Wedge. Monster, indeed.

Section V: Female Sexuality Awakens

Sarah is pulled into the Labyrinth’s world of sexual awakening when she summons Jareth, who shows up in the window of her parents’ bedroom. Jareth tells her he has brought her a gift. “It’s a crystal, nothing more. But if you turn it this way, look into it, it will show you your dreams.” Later in the film, Jareth sends her just such a crystal, which transports her to a highly sexualized ballroom with adult men and women wearing phallic masks (check out the horns and noses). She is the only character wearing white, symbolic of purity and virginity. After stumbling around the room, startled by the lascivious behavior she sees, she encounters Jareth who sweeps her in for a “dance” while singing to her, “As the pain sweeps through makes no sense for you. Every thrill is gone, wasn’t too much fun at all. But I’ll be there for you as the world falls down”. A song about the loss of virginity if I ever heard one. However, catching sight of a clock, she realizes she is running out of time to save her baby brother (innocence) and smashes a mirror, shattering the illusion.

Rey and Kylo engage in their own “dance”, during which the most transparent veiled pick-up line in cinematic history (aside from “Forget about your innocence the baby” of course) occurs when Kylo tells Rey, “You need a teacher. I can show you the ways of the Force.” First, “You need a teacher” is an established trope both in cinema/literature and real life for initiating romance. Men like to teach women of interest activities, whether driving a manual transmission or playing video games, as an evolutionary mechanism of showing fitness to mate. It’s a way of saying, “Look at all the skills I know and can show you. You should mate with me because you can count on me for survival skills.” (Yes, I’m aware of the not so feminist implications of this. I didn’t write the evolutionary handbook; I’m just its messenger.) Next, long time Star Wars fans will recall that typically when a Dark Side user is speaking about the Force or trying to recruit new members, some variation of “the power of the Dark Side” is used. Even Kylo, earlier in the film, tells Lor San Tekka, “I’ll show you the Dark Side”. There is a reason Kylo’s proposition to Rey is phrased “ways of the Force”. Read: Ways of the world, a euphemism for sex. Smooth, buddy. Smooth. However, based on the close-up shots that follow, it just might have worked.

Ladies and gentlemen, I give you the first non-sex sex scene in a Lucasfilm production. These shots are in order, so I’d just like to point out that as Rey’s face goes from struggle and concentration to loving it, Kylo’s goes from “I think I love this woman” to “Oh, let me help you find that Force” to “Yeah, you take it”. Something tells me it’s not just the Force that awakened in Rey.

Section VI: Confrontations and Female Empowerment

In Labyrinth, Sarah and Jareth’s final showdown occurs on the remaining piece of the Escher room, a room symbolic of confusion. In the Escher room, where Sarah haphazardly chases her baby brother Toby every which way on stairs that lead senseless directions, we get a glimpse of Jareth’s rather sad perspective, one in which he is not the villain of the story but a man (or supernatural being) attempting to live up to a girl’s unrealistic expectations of him. “You starve and near exhaust me. Everything I’ve done I’ve done for you,” he sings. When the Escher room crumbles only Sarah and Jareth remain standing on its remaining piece. It is here that Sarah at last displays the clarity and wisdom to take down her alluring foe. Jareth tells her, “Just fear me, love me, do as I say and I will be your slave.” Sarah defeats him by proclaiming, “You have no power over me.” This sexual awakening was Sarah’s fantasy and Sarah’s story to begin with; she needed only claim it.

In The Force Awakens, Rey defeats Kylo Ren at his own game not once but twice. The first instance occurs during her interrogation when Kylo is attempting to read her mind in order to extract the map to Luke Skywalker. As he attempts to push into her mind, she turns his game around and pushes back into his, revealing his greatest fear, that he will never be as strong as Darth Vader, emasculating him and leaving him shaking as he bolts from the room.

Kylo’s second defeat occurs during their lightsaber duel on Starkiller Base. After “finding the Force together” Rey launches an understandably vicious attack against Kylo, leading to a grappling match in which the blue legacy lightsaber is raised victoriously aloft via Kylo raising Rey’s wrist while Rey grips Kylo’s wrist and pummels his red crossguard saber into the earth, a symbol for female fertility. After the red blade is extinguished, Rey forces Kylo to the ground, emasculated and spent.

Rey uses Ben Organa-Solo’s lightsaber to defeat Kylo Ren and extinguish his. (Repeat that last sentence aloud, then report back on the symbolism):

Kylo Ren, his lightsaber extinguished in the ground, marked and spent:

Notably, after Kylo is disarmed Rey slashes his face. Why scar him in this way? Remember that snake noise when Kylo unmasked? Kylo unmasking caught Rey off-guard, both from an attraction standpoint and in making her think there was more beneath the mask than just a “creature” or “monster”. Likely feeling angry at both Kylo and herself for falling for what she perceives as trickery when he kills his father, Rey fixes the issue by slashing the tempting snake’s pretty face. Ironically, males with scars, particularly facial scars, are perceived as more attractive because evolutionarily this indicates a surviving alpha male and thus signals desirable genes. While our rational brain may say, “Yeah, but that’s the scar Rey gave him after she kicked his butt” our hindbrain (and Rey’s) still says, “Oo a scar – now those are some genes I’d like to pass on”. In attempting to disfigure Kylo so that he is no longer a temptation, Rey makes him even more irresistible for future encounters.

A key difference exists between the ending of Labyrinth and The Force Awakens. Whereas Labyrinth was meant as a single movie and ends with the heroine defeating the villain, The Force Awakens was meant as part one of a trilogy, with strong narrative hints toward a future romance between the villain antihero and heroine. In the first story of female sexual awakening we are presented with an adolescent girl who is leaving childhood, encounters a physical manifestation of her own unrealistic and problematic expectations of male sexuality, and defeats this antagonist by reclaiming her power. In the second tale we are presented with a young woman who is leaving childhood, encounters a dangerous masked antagonist who is revealed to be a handsome but dark young man, defeats him by twice emasculating him, and is foreshadowed to have future romantic encounters with him, presumably as Ben Organa-Solo, the rightful heir of the Skywalker legacy lightsaber, the symbol of the Light Side and appropriate use of masculine power.

Section VII: Conclusion

The heroine-villain/antihero trope serves several functions in Labyrinth and The Force Awakens. First, this trope allows for safe exploration of female sexuality with males women are evolutionarily primed to be attracted to, often considered dangerous territory and “not supposed to’s” according to social mores. Next, the villain or antihero represents challenge and acts as a foil for personal growth and exploration within the heroine. Finally, the conquering of the dangerous male, either by defeat and removal of presence or by replacement of inappropriate masculine power with appropriate masculine power, serves as a device of female empowerment.

BLANKETS [JungkookxReader](Part 3/5)

Originally posted by pleasingpics

Pairing: Jungkook x Reader (Feat. Yoongi, Jimin, Taehyung)

Genre: Romance/Angst/Smut BadBoyAU!

Summary: A one night stand turned into various visits. No strings attached, or at least that is what you told yourself every time he walked through the door. His first name was the only thing you knew, besides having memorized every sensitive spot that laid upon his skin.

One night you catch a glimpse of his world. One that you had never had the temptation to roam on your free will. Jungkook though was addicting, and your craving for his touches led you to venture into his life. This new found world offering you a freedom you didn’t know existed. The consequences of your actions instead of taking you a step closer to him, formed a barrier. Jungkook’s sweet touches turned rough with rage, his passionate kisses turned possessive, and his comfortable casual talk went to promises/lies of a forever.

Rating: M [Language, Strong Scenes, Drug usage, Sexual Scenes](Will add a warning prior if that chapter will contain any smut scenes)

Author’s Note: Sorry for the HUGE delay with this one. I am from Texas, and due to Mother Nature I was in a bit of a pickle. Thankfully I am okay, and I finally finished the third part. Once again it is not 100% edited, but I hope you guys like it. Next Chapter will be longer. I hope ya’ll enjoy.

Also quick confession….. I have never written in 2nd POV till now, so sorry for any mistakes I might commit while writing in this form.

Trigger warning: Drugs, alcohol, and Sexual scenes

Not 100% edited yet. Might have minor mistakes :)

Feedback is greatly appreciated!

Word Count: 2,900+

Blankets

.Part 1. .Part 2. [Fic Playlist]

MASTERLIST


My heart tells me this is the best and greatest feeling I have ever had. But my mind knows the difference between wanting what you can’t have and wanting what you shouldn’t want. And I shouldn’t want you.
—  Cassandra Clare, City of Glass

Keep reading

The 100 and Eden

okay at the request of @tracylorde​ and always with the help of @bellameblake​ who lets me shout at her about these things im gonna just write out my thought on 5x01 being called Eden and what that could mean for the 100. 

The 100 and J Roth have always been big fans of religious references and retellings so when the title of Eden was announced i was like “yooooo this gonna be good”. 

SO the basic story of Eden in the Bible (that i remember) is that God created Eden, he then created Adam and Eve and put them in the Garden to tend to it. They where allowed to eat anything but from this one tree. Satan comes down and tempts Eve to eat from the Tree and gain knowledge. Eve does and so does Adam. It’s called the Original Sin. There’s also the idea of the introduction of guilt into the garden because of this sin and a loss of innocence in humanity. AND in the end if i remember a particularly graphic bible lesson Adam and Eve get cast out of Eden to suffer on the….well in not Eden!

So if we look at it in the context of the 100 Clarke is obviously the one living in Eden rn but she’s being…invaded by Gagarin Prison transport. So obviously this dark ship descending on Eden, I think, represents the introduction of darkness and even sin to the semi-ideal world we see Clarke living in. This also kinda ties in with Madi because she seems to be the representing the innocence of Eden and this ship is going to corrupt the pureness. 

Because im extra i was also thinking about how the Space Kru and Bellamy’s return would tie into that. I actually thought about the concept of Adam and Eve because of Bellamy and Clarke’s partnership and because the whole group is really all we have left of the “original” people we saw inhabiting earth yes i know the grounders where already there but just keep reading. 

So if the group aligned with Clarke on their return to earth and they battled the Eligius Corporation group together but if that group is stronger and have corrupted the inhabitants of Eden …then the conclusion that fits the most in the story is that the Space Kru +Clarke and Madi will be thrown out of Eden into the wasteland lands outside.

Anyway…idk plot wise and with the spoilers we have gotten this fits for me and The 100 has a history of using religious stories and retelling them…or it could all be wrong and i could be overthinking the entire thing….

I would love to hear what people think and if anyone has more Bible knowledge then me i’d love to hear your input! 

anonymous asked:

Answers for Ruki?

Give me a character and I will answer:

Why I like them
Hoo boi. I love Ruki. On some days he’s my second favourite. What an interesting character. Great backstory, which even has him completing a character arc, going from a selfish aristocrat, to a street urchin struggling with his pride, and then a branded leader of three boys. I admit my bias is tall dark and handsome guys, but it’s warranted with Ruki. He’s almost like a cold military leader, and is very into control with Yui. His manipulative and dominant side is kind of hot to me, to be honest. He does everything in order to tighten the net around Yui and make her see only him. I think what people overlook though, is Ruki’s stress and inner turmoil. It’s a thing that crops up every time with his character and really it makes me like him more. It shows that there are consequences of being the leader and being wound so tight with control.

 I see him as a good brother to the Mukami’s too, and I really like their bonding moments where Ruki shows he cares. I’d be lying though if I said his softer moments with Yui don’t slay me. They don’t happen overly much but when they do, I melt. His Sleeping Vampire killed me when he grew interested in Yui’s dreams. His philosophical side is also another reason why I like him, and he reflects on his position quite a bit.

Why I don’t
He killed a cat, I love kitties. I understand the mentality behind his actions though, but still. Sad times. I also dislike it when he pushes Yui away even in Dark Fate and refuses to share his worries with her, but again, it’s part of his character and he does move past it.

Favorite episode (scene if movie)

Anime

Manga

Favorite season/movie/game

Uncertain tbh

Favorite line

‘But… …I am the snake tempting Eve. You are tempted, given the sweet nectar, and in the end, became corrupt. That’s your role. Even if it’s a mortal sin against God, I won’t stop. You will become my Eve.’ - Ruki’s Vampire End MB

Favorite outfit

OTP
I really ship Ruki x Yui. I don’t know how to explain it but this guy needs Yui. Obviously all the guys do to an extent, but being a leader and keeping everything to himself, he NEEDS her, as someone to share that stuff with. He’d never admit it, and he pushes her away constantly, trying to stand on his own, but as I said before, stress is a huge part of his character, and Yui is his potential catharsis.He worries about Karl abandoning them, about not fulfilling their debt, about keeping Yui at his side, about being Adam, about Yui being taken away from him, his brothers finding out that Karl manipulated their lives- *pauses for breath*

Deep deep down, he needs someone to stand with him and be that someone who will listen to him and be a person his brothers can look to as well. And this does happen. Yui notices Ruki’s stress and hidden emotions, when even his brothers don’t. Ruki naturally hates that she knows this side of him, that she voices her concern, because it means to him that he isn’t in control. She makes him feel weaker because he unknowingly sympathises with her position as ‘Livestock’ because that was what he used to be. 

His mother abandoning him makes it extremely difficult for trust to be born between them. They’re a very deep and potentially angsty ship, but once they’re past the emotional barriers, Ruki demonstrates the kindness that he shows his brothers. And he IS capable of it, even though he appears stoic. I really love the symbolism of Eve with the Serpent anyway, and there’s a lot of different themes that can be explored with them. I like couples that don’t necessarily understand each other, but can still find common ground in shared pain. I also just like him being a super serious depressing thinker and Yui just completely derails his morbid thinking with her sunshine.

Brotp
Azusa and Ruki are great bros. I think Azusa is a big reason for why Ruki was able to become a leader for the Mukami’s in the first place. On top of being slightly humbled by his time on the streets, Ruki now had this lil boy following him around (Ruki met Azusa first out of the Mukamis) and I dunno, I just think it taught him about looking after someone other than himself. This is especially apparent when Ruki and the others get shot while escaping from the orphanage, and Ruki tells Azusa to keep running and leave them behind. To say that Ruki not long before was whipping his servants and acting like a spoiled brat, this is an amazing load of character development to happen before the events of More Blood even start. 

Head Canon
When Ruki and Yui have children, or just one kid, I imagine that he’d read to them every night. He’d be a patient father and teach them things. I dunno, the thought of Ruki teaching his kid to tie shoelaces is really cute to me. Naturally the kid will be spoiled rotten by having the other Mukami’s as uncles.

Unpopular opinion
I don’t think I have one for Ruki. 

A wish
Again, I don’t really have one, just for him to be happy and open himself up to trust.

An oh-god-please-dont-ever-happen
For the fandom to see him as nothing more than anime Christian Grey. Ruki has waaaay more depth than that guy and just…no.

5 words to best describe them
Dark, Handsome, Complex, Dominant, Guarded

My nickname for them
I don’t really have one for Ruki but I always tend to think of the saying - gentlemen are just patient wolves

anonymous asked:

I'm not sure if you've done anything on it (I tried looking before I asked but) have you done a meta regarding the apple tree on Lucy's book?

Hey Anon,

not really… I have updated this post about Emma’s tattoo. Obviously the apple tree is connected to Regina. I think Emma’s tattoo - which appeared for the first time when Regina offered her an apple - may be an apple blossom.

When Emma first accepted the apple, she wasn’t ready for it. Henry took it and tossed it away. She needed to deal with her issues surrounding Henry first. Now with their mutual True Love’s kiss, Emma’s finally dealt with the traumas from her past connected to Henry.

Looks like the new book will be about Regina’s story…

There’s a bit in The Secret History of the World by Jonathan Black I was reading that got my attention, but I’m still thinking about how the pieces fit together.

The Morning Star is, of course, Venus. The Bible, therefore, identifies Lucifer with the planet Venus. It might seem counter-intuitive to equate the goddess of Venus in Greece and Rome - Aphrodite to the Greeks - with Lucifer in the Judeo-Christian tradition. Venus/Aphrodite is female and seems more life-enhancing. But in reality there are key points of similarity.

Both Lucifer and Venus/Aphrodite are bound up with animal desire and sexuality. The apple is the fruit associated with both. Lucifer tempts Eve with an apple and Paris hands Venus an apple in a gesture that precipitates the abduction of Helen and the Great War of the ancient world. The apple is universally the fruit of Venus because if you slice an apple in two, the path that Venus traces in the sky over the forty-year period is a five-pointed star, pinpointed by the position of the pips.

Lucifer and Venus are also ambiguous figures. Lucifer is evil, but he is a necessary evil. Without Lucifer’s intervention, proto-humanity would not have evolved beyond a vegetative form of life. As a result of Lucifer’s intervention in history we are animated, both in the sense that we can move about the surface of the planet and also in the sense that we are moved by desire. An animal has a conscious awareness of itself as a distinct entity that is denied to plants. To say that Adam and Eve ‘knew they were naked’ is to say that they became aware that they had bodies.

We have a new character called Lucy, we have an apple tree and we have Lily’s tattoo which looked like the Venus star and is in the same place as Emma’s tattoo.

If the tattoo disappeared and it was an apple blossom… does that mean it has blossomed into an apple?

So, these are the bits and pieces I’m currently working with, thought I’d share in case it sparks something with someone.

5

Wonder not, sovran Mistress, if perhaps
Thou canst, who art sole wonder! much less arm
Thy looks, the Heaven of mildness, with disdain,
Displeased that I approach thee thus, and gaze
Insatiate; I thus single; nor have feared
Thy awful brow, more awful thus retired.
Fairest resemblance of thy Maker fair,
Thee all things living gaze on, all things thine
By gift, and thy celestial beauty adore
With ravishment beheld! there best beheld,
Where universally admired; but here
In this enclosure wild, these beasts among,
Beholders rude, and shallow to discern
Half what in thee is fair, one man except,
Who sees thee? and what is one? who should be seen
A Goddess among Gods, adored and served
By Angels numberless, thy daily train.

BOOK IX.Milton: Paradise Lost

Satan flattering Eve to tempt her to eat the apple.

Ego. Devil on your Shoulder?

by Saṃsāran

This piece is about the evolution of ego. There are, of course, no devils or angels but the ancients had no understanding of the workings of the mind and assigned that voice that tempts us as “Satan”. 

Now Satan in the old days was not a talking snake and not a red goat hooved monster. He was a tempter. He had no power to make us do anything. Yet, there is a voice within us which is somehow not us. It shows us options and not all of those options are kind or good.

Animals do not have ego. Not because they don’t have souls or anything like that but because they do not have a highly developed cerebral cortex i.e. that part of the human brain that thinks abstractly and projects possible futures. Human beings can literally argue with themselves.

It works like this. In our abstract minds, we consider a situation We run a sort of simulation of various scenarios and then choose the one we think is best. Ego spins the scenarios and will chooses.

So, ego might spin the scenario of going down to the lake at dawn. One scenario has us catching fish for breakfast. Another scenario has us eaten by a crocodile because they are more active at dawn. So, will chooses the safer option and we go fishing later in the morning. It all happens in seconds.

Now sometimes ego will spin a scenario like this: My friend’s wife is really sexy. He is gone a lot and she is always looking at me. I should see if I can have sex with her. Now the other voice steps in and says “absolutely not! He is your friend and if you are caught he might come after you”. So we weigh the chances. Our lust vs. our friendship. Ultimately we pick one of the other.

So you see how ego could be seen as an evil entity? A tempter. Ego spins the scenario but WE (our will) must choose and act. Many religions, including Judaism (Eve tempted in the garden), Christianity (Jesus tempted in the desert) and Buddhism (the Buddha tempted by the demon Mara) have temptation stories. These stories can be seen as allegories of ego.

So, to sum up, ego evolved when we gained the ability to imagine a future and future possibilities. It serves a useful purpose but can also lead us astray. Ancient people saw this tempting voice in our head as a demon or devil which led us into temptation. The key to managing ego is to learn NOT to identify with it. You are not ego. 

Ego is a tool of the mind and must be used with good sense. Ego is striving and will often say hurtful things like “you aren’t good enough because you have a lousy car” and “you are fat and ugly and nobody will ever love you”. If you identify with ego then you will believe this. Maybe you will buy a better car. Maybe you will think that you are unlovable and spend your life in forlorn hopelessness.

Remember the tempter is only a voice in your head. You decide. You are in control. Never forget this.

Butch DeLoriaxFemale Lone Wanderer Headcanons

So I have this HUGE idea for a Butch DeLoria x Female Lone Wanderer fanfiction. And I have all these damn headcanons. Shall I write a giant story about all these? (Please don’t steal the ideas! I really want to write this someday but I can’t hold these ideas in anymore.)

  • The Female Lone Wanderer’s headcanonical name is Eve, Eva or Evelyn. James and the FLW’s mother were both religious and quoted the bible. Also, The GECK James searched for stands for Garden of Eden Creation Kit. He would want his daughter to belong to something beautiful. Not to mention…President Eden is this big lie in the same way that utopia can never exist, and the FLW comes to accept that. While she searches long and hard for a better life, she is only shown that she can no longer obtain what she wants. Not to mention, Butch is a Tunnel SNAKE, like the snake who tempted Eve. He believes in anarchy and making one’s own choices that defy the higher power (the Overseer who plays God).
  •  Butch’s father was killed by the overseer. Ellen DeLoria is always drunk like she’s washing away sorrows. Butch’s father used to tell him stories about the outside world and tell him to never tell anyone because everyone is supposed to believe that you are born in the vault and die in the vault. Eventually, when Butch was three or four, his father tried to leave the Vault and was shot by the Overseer’s henchman, perhaps Officer Kendall. Butch could barely remember this…but eventually figured it out as the years went on. His hatred for the Overseer’s control was a personal matter as well as his rebellious spirit coming to light.
  • Butch and the FLW were best friends before the age of nine. They used to share Grognak the Barbarian comic books, and play in the atrium. Eventually however, Butch received pressure from the other boys (mainly Wally Mack) to break away because of gender roles. The female lone wanderer then got even closer to Amata.
  • Butch DeLoria is afraid of radroaches because, when he was five he was locked in the lowest level of Vault 101. His alcoholic mother Ellen DeLoria locked him there.  Butch kept asking his mom about what happened to his dad, and afraid of the Overseer’s wrath, she told Butch to stop asking. But being a  typical five year old, he kept asking over and over. So, she dragged him to the sub basement area while intoxicated. After locking the door, he began to cry and scream after a radroach came out and attacked him. James shows up with his daughter to unlock the door and comfort him. After that, Butch holds a respect for James, but has a resentment towards his daughter that he doesn’t have a father like him. When Butch bullies the lone wanderer, James never actually gets angry since he still feels bad about Butch’s lack of a father figure.
  • The FLW always cried to her dad about Butch. James told her that boys only tease you when they like you… For years, she hoped that was the case. But she still didn’t believe that hitting on her actually meant hitting her!
  • The Female Lone Wanderer is nicknamed “Nosebleed” because of what Butch did. At the age of nine, the kids were playing baseball in the atrium. Eventually, the female became MVP (because the perk says so) and jealous of this, the opposing team’s players told Butch to bring her down a notch. When she was up to bat, he was pitcher, and threw the baseball right at her face, where it hit her nose and she received a bloody nose. He’d been calling her “Nosebleed” ever since.
  • The Female Lone wanderer never fights back against Butch unless he’s bullying someone else, namely Amata. He then stops targeting  Amata after realizing this and tries even harder to get a rise out of her, like throwing gum in her hair during class or tripping her after class. When it never works, he gets obsessed with this…and maybe even develops something far different from hatred.
  • When they were seventeen, Butch fucked up the FLW’s hair. To get back at him for all his teasing she called him a hairdresser instead of a barber. He decided to pull  a prank and botched her long hair unevenly. When she told Amata, Amata tied it like her own hair. So they wore similar hairstyles for a long time. Over time, the ponytail began to grow out more until it no longer resembled the other girl. But she refused to go back to the Vault hairdresser…err barber.
  • A year before the FLW left Vault 101, her relationship with Butch got…somewhat…better. While he still teased her, shoved her in the halls when the other guys were around, etc, he began to get quiet when it was just the two of them. He’d watch her shooting her BB gun in the basement, and even gave her a shot of whiskey he managed to steal from the Overseer’s chambers. They finally got to talk about what it was like growing up with one of their parents being dead. It turns out they had more in common than they initially thought.
  • Butch began to date Susie Mack, Wally Mack’s sister. She’d never admit to it, but when the FLW catches them making out in the hall, she immediately turns back around where she came from and feels like she could cry without fully comprehending why. Butch tries to talk to the FLW and be nicer, but she instead treats him harshly because of her jealousy. He again turns hostile. Wally Mack soon quits the Tunnel Snakes after that, pissed that Butch would go with his sister. 
  • After she left the vault, the FLW always wore the Tunnel Snakes jacket Butch gave her. She began to panic as it got more and more damaged. Eventually, Moira fixed it up, and teases that it has the scent of a man’s aftershave and cologne.
  • Butch DeLoria was the one who spray painted “Fuck You, Overseer” on the “Thank You, Overseer” sign. Amata kept yelling at him to stop it. But he managed to make a contraption out of rope to allow him to paint the sign with the other Tunnel Snakes
  • Butch meets James Hargrave in Rivet City. The kid with a bad attitude has a dead father and alcoholic mother and he reminds Butch so much of himself as a child that it begins to disturb him. He tells the kid about his own life and even becomes like a big brother James could look up to. He also told James to be always be good to C.J. Young, the little girl who always follows james around. And if he does, he’ll even let him join the Tunnel Snakes when he grows up. James asks why he has to act so nice to her. Butch tells James that he’ll understand why when he’s older…. Because he wishes he could’ve treated the FLW better. Every day, he’d been waiting for her to show up in Rivet City…
  • When the FLW agrees to travel with Butch again, she knees him in the groin. Butch apologizes for all the times he bullied her and beat her up when they were kids. So, she knees him in the balls and says she forgives him. He of course crumples to the floor and says “Yeah…maybe…I deserved that Nosebleed.”
  • Butch DeLoria is still a HUGE Grognak the Barbarian comic book fan at the age of 20. His line “I hear there were dragons out there. You ever seen one?” reveals this. It drives the FLW crazy, especially since he spends all their caps on rare issues rather than on the supplies they need.
  • When the pair sleep in Raider camps outdoors, the female lone wanderer always takes the top bunk when they manage to find bunkbeds. Based on the line “Man that creeps me out. That thing up there…you know? The sky…” The lone wanderer knows he’s terrified to look up there, so she alleviates his fear by taking the top bunk, making it feel like he’s back in the Vault.
  • Butch suffers from monophobia: the fear of being alone. His whole “Tunnel Snakes 4 LYFE” motto is only him trying to belong to something. The Tunnel Snakes have no real goals or purpose besides to be “the most badassest gang in the wastes”. Plus, he’s the only one to leave the vault for good after Trouble on the Homefront. This likely means, he knows the gang is over with and everyone else abandoned him… Even still, he follows the FLW and uses the “gang” as an excuse. He never wants anyone else following you. So how could a gang ever form?
  • Butch sings along to Galaxy News Radio. Whenever they are at a bar, Butch gets buzzed and just starts singing along. The FLW told him a million times to shut the hell up, but he just sings louder. His favorite song is supposedly “I’m a Mighty Mighty Man.” because it says that “I really don’t need a wife.” This upsets the FLW though she never says so.
  • The Female Lone Wanderer loves when Butch cuts her hair. The feeling of his fingers against her scalp takes her breath away…until he decides to play the same prank like when they were kids and shaves part of her scalp. She sics Dogmeat on him.
  • Butch really likes Dogmeat, though initially acts like he doesn’t. This is since he doesn’t mind having Dogmeat follow as well. He wanted to sew Dogmeat a personal Tunnel Snake jacket… The FLW forbid it.
  • Butch manages to find a way to bake a sweetroll. He goes through life and limb to obtain the ingredients. He gives it to the female lone wanderer as a peace offering after taking her sweet roll at her birthday party ten years prior.
  • The Lone Wanderer says goodbye to Dogmeat and Butch during the last quest (without expansion). She makes a slight joke that Dogmeat and Butch should go into the irradiated chamber of Project Purity. And while Butch declines, he doesn’t believe that she planned to do it anyway. He doesn’t understand why she says goodbye and tells him to take care of Dogmeat. When she goes in, he tries to stop her but it’s too late.
  • Butch goes into a huge depression before the events of Broken Steel (aka end of game without expansion). He becomes an alcoholic just like his mother and only has thoughts of the lone wanderer. Dogmeat ends up taking care of him more than he takes care of Dogmeat. Every day, Butch regrets that he didn’t activate the control chamber in her stead. Whenever he hears Three Dog mention her on GNR, he gives a toast before downing his last shot and smashing the glass. Instead of “I’m a Mighty Man” he only listens to the slow sad songs like “I Don’t Want to Set the World on Fire.
  • Ok, that last one made me tear up. AHEM. The female lone wanderer and Butch are in love. I mean…that damn dialogue. As a follower, he flirts so much only if you’re female. Need I say more?
  • Butch and Dogmeat are reunited with the Female Lone Wanderer… The Three Tunnel Snakes For Life. 
The Serpent Wasn’t Banished from the Garden

[In Genesis the serpent isn’t banished but is made to crawl in punishment. Art of which always bugs me as the snake chatting with Eve at the tempting stage is already legless. He wasn’t cursed yet. He didn’t look like that… But I digress…]

In the episode The Apple the Enterprise crew explore an Eden planet. The “god” of this Eden attempts to repel the outside influence, killing three crewmen, and taking a lot of potshots at Spock. Spock, however, is immortal. The point is explicitly made–one proven deadly force turned against him after another–Spock cannot be banished by the powers Vaal wields to defend the paradise he oversees.

Force 1: Flora. The flowers are deadly to humans.


Not deadly to Spock.


Force 2: Earth. The rocks are deadly to humans.

Keep reading

Sheimi and a Connection to The Garden of Eden?

(Also posted on The Blue Knight Forum)

I’m surprised this hasn’t been mentioned before…but what if the Garden of Amahara is supposed to represent the Garden of Eden?

After all, anyone familiar with the story (and all the versions: Judaism, Christianity, and Islam, though most notably I think the Christianity version would have been considered) knows how related it is to Satan. This could explain a possible connection between Sheimi and the twins.

Taking a passage from Genesis:

Now the serpent was more crafty than any of the wild animals the LORD God had made. He said to the woman, “Did God really say, ‘You must not eat from any tree in the garden’?” The woman said to the serpent, “We may eat fruit from the trees in the garden, but God did say, ‘You must not eat fruit from the tree that is in the middle of the garden, and you must not touch it, or you will die.’" “You will not certainly die,” the serpent said to the woman. “For God knows that when you eat from it your eyes will be opened, and you will be like God, knowing good and evil.” When the woman saw that the fruit of the tree was good for food and pleasing to the eye, and also desirable for gaining wisdom, she took some and ate it. She also gave some to her husband, who was with her, and he ate it. Then the eyes of both of them were opened, and they realized they were naked; so they sewed fig leaves together and made coverings for themselves.

Notice that there’s a big theme of good and evil here. This theme is very prominent in the manga. After all, we have characters – notably, Yukio – who speculate all the time about what is good and what is evil. Supposedly, the fruit of the trees in the Garden of Eden hold this knowledge. Therefore, the Garden of Amahara – while “legend” to Sheimi – might actually hold answers to what good and evil are, and what the solutions might be. It might have connections to the Blue Knight, and to the truth everyone seeks. Even if the garden itself isn’t real, it might be symbolic of other connections to Shemihaza…like Sheimi.

We know that Shemihaza has pretty obvious connections to Sheimi. After all, Sheimi’s name is similar to “Shemihaza,” and they both have the motif of gardens, etc. etc.

From the Emperors thread in the forum:

(Quote from: Taytronics7)

Shemihaza is the leader of the Grigori, which makes sense since Shemihaza was also the name of the leader of a band of fallen angels in the Book of Enoch from which it was inspired. His title is the Emperor of Creation, which implies that he had some sort of part in the making of the world. His motif is plants, which goes well with his title.

So…“Shemihaza” is the name of a leader of a band of fallen angels. And the Garden of Eden is a garden, which is connected to creation, which is connected to Shemihaza. And Satan was a fallen angel, who tempted Eve (Adam in Islam’s version) and got them kicked out of the Garden. There’s a lot of intertwining with the story here, between fallen angels, Satan, gardens and creation. And all this has got to be tied to Sheimi, somehow. More particularly, to Sheimi and Satan. Her family clearly has some sort of history with Shemihaza, one that Sheimi doesn’t know about…she doesn’t need to know about it, necessarily, because it’s so far back, I’m guessing, but it must connect with this entire thing about demons, thus influencing her decision to become an Exorcist.

Shemihaza is on the side of humans. This makes sense if she/he/it has connections to the Garden of Amahara (Eden). If Satan is anti-human and caused Adam and Eve, or “humans,” to be kicked out of the Garden, Shemihaza might be against that having happened, and is thus there to protect humans, or bring them back onto better terms with “God,” or just bring them back into the garden, or “peace.”

Either this, or the Garden of Amahara can simply represent the Gardens in heaven, which I think has been mentioned before. But that doesn’t leave much room for speculation, does it?

- Limitlesshobbies