european fairytales

German Folklore

German folklore is the folk tradition which has naturally developed in Germany over the centuries. It shares many characteristics with Scandinavian and English folklore due to their origins in Germanic mythology, reflecting a similar mix of influences: a pre-Christian pantheon and other beings equivalent to those of Norse mythology; magical characters (often pre-Christian) associated with Christian festivals, and various regional stories. 

As in Scandinavia, when belief in the old gods disappeared, remnants of the mythos persisted: Holda, a supernatural patron of spinning; the Lorelei, a dangerous Rhein siren derived from 19th century literature; the spirit Berchta (aka Perchta); the Weisse Frauen, a water spirit said to protect children; the Wild Hunt (in German folklore preceded by an old man, Honest Eckart, who warns others of its approach); the giant Rübezahl; changeling legends; and many more generic entities such as the elf, dwarf, kobold, and erlking.

Popular holiday-related folklore includes Krampus and Knecht Ruprecht, a rough companion to Santa Claus; the Lutzelfrau, a Yule witch who must be appeased with small presents, the Osterhase (the original Easter Bunny), and Walpurgisnacht, a spring festival derived from Pagan customs. Character folklore includes the stories of Pied Piper of Hameln, the trickster hero Till Eulenspiegel, the Town Musicians of Bremen, and Faust.

Documentation and preservation of folklore in the German states was initially fostered in the 18th and 19th centuries. The Saxon author Johann Karl August Musäus was an early collector; study was further promoted by Prussian poet and philosopher Johann Gottfried von Herder. His belief in the role of folklore in ethnic nationalism - a folklore of Germany as a nation rather than of disunited German-speaking peoples - inspired the Brothers Grimm, Goethe and others. Folklore elements, such as the Rhine Maidens and the Grimms’ The Story of a Boy Who Went Forth to Learn Fear, formed part of the source material for Richard Wagner’s opera cycle Der Ring des Nibelungen. Some of the works of Washington Irving - notably Rip van Winkle and The Legend of Sleepy Hollow - are based on German folktales.

Within Germany, the nationalistic aspect was further emphasized during the National Socialist era. Folklore studies, Volkskunde, were co-opted as a political tool to seek out traditional customs in order to support the idea of historical continuity within a Germanic culture. 

Whitewashing Defenders' Greatest Hits

“If you have to have someone who looks like you in the media in order for you to relate then maybe you’re the one who’s racist" 

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"children don’t see/care about race" 

"Color doesn’t matter! It’s about the actor/story!”

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“there are bigger issues to talk about than representation”

“they whitewashed because they need to make a profit and attract their target audience”

“historical accuracy”

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“It’s a European fairytale/story so of course the characters will be white!”

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“whitewashing isn’t real”

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anonymous asked:

What are the little people in ToG? I imagine little gnome-like people, but they're probably like the size of children.

You know. There is probably a right answer to this. Or a more historical, folklore answer to this. So I’m going to default to @sarahviehmann because she would be the one to ask. She might not see this though cuz she is currently basking in the presence of our Queen and Savior Leigh Bardugo. (IMSTILLNOTOVERITNOPENOPE)

But my answer is that size-wise they probably maybe lie somewhere between Barbie doll size and garden variety gnome size. I don’t recall ever reading, or coming across, anything in my studies that indicated they were child size. Maybe 1 year old size at biggest??? But I have not delved into European fairytales and folklore to the extend that @sarahviehmann has. She is the expert here. This falls outside my area of knowledge.

bubblytealatte  asked:

I am not sure whether or not you had a say in this but if you did, why did you choose the Linked Horizon as the band to play Attack On Titan's theme songs. Even if you didn't do you think the theme songs fit Attack On Titan well?

They’re known for their fairytale like European (esp German) inspired music that still has this rock elements which just suits the anime very well, because it’s set up is a bit like a fairytale world at first, which is European inspired but it also has the hard reality in it.

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In 2007, the small town of Urueña, Spain decided to become a Villa del Libro, or a town of books. This is what it looks like.

Imagine a small medieval town behind a high wall. A castle stands on one end, and all around are vineyards and fields of wheat. Imagine that within the walls the entire town is devoted to reading and writing. Imagine that the entire town is, in essence, one magical bookstore.

One of many European wonders, this fairytale for bibliophiles exists in Spain. The place is called Urueña, and it is only a two hour drive northwest from Madrid. The town sits within a medieval wall, surrounded by vast plains, in the region of Castilla y León. In recent years, it has transformed itself into a Villa del Libro, a village that celebrates books.

Fewer than 200 people live in Urueña, according to the 2014 census. But these few villagers run 12 different bookstores, meaning that there’s one bookstore for every sixteen or so people. Some are general interest shops; others specialize in old and rare books. One focuses on the region of Castilla y León, another on children’s books. A shop called El 7 Bookshop specializes in books about bullfighting. Another concentrates its collection on books about wine, and this one is called The Cellar.

In addition to the bookstores, Urueña is home to an institute of ancient calligraphy that offers classes in the old writing techniques found in medieval handwritten tomes. Similarly, the Artisan Book Binding Workshop of Urueña holds seminars on how to physically create and unite the spines, covers, and pages that make up books

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This Small Village In Spain Is Home To More Books Than People

By John on January 12, 2016

In 2007, the small town of Urueña, Spain decided to become a Villa del Libro, or a town of books. This is what it looks like.

One of the old medieval gates leading out of Urueña, Spain’s Villa del Libro. Image Source: Flickr

Imagine a small medieval town behind a high wall. A castle stands on one end, and all around are vineyards and fields of wheat. Imagine that within the walls the entire town is devoted to reading and writing. Imagine that the entire town is, in essence, one magical bookstore.

One of many European wonders, this fairytale for bibliophiles exists in Spain. The place is called Urueña, and it is only a two hour drive northwest from Madrid. The town sits within a medieval wall, surrounded by vast plains, in the region of Castilla y León. In recent years, it has transformed itself into a Villa del Libro, a village that celebrates books.

Fewer than 200 people live in Urueña, according to the 2014 census. But these few villagers run 12 different bookstores, meaning that there’s one bookstore for every sixteen or so people. Some are general interest shops; others specialize in old and rare books. One focuses on the region of Castilla y León, another on children’s books. A shop called El 7 Bookshop specializes in books about bullfighting. Another concentrates its collection on books about wine, and this one is called The Cellar.

In addition to the bookstores, Urueña is home to an institute of ancient calligraphy that offers classes in the old writing techniques found in medieval handwritten tomes. Similarly, the Artisan Book Binding Workshop of Urueña holds seminars on how to physically create and unite the spines, covers, and pages that make up books.

One of the twelve bookstores in the small town of Urueña, Spain. Image Source: Flickr

Urueña also boasts five well-run museums. Naturally, there’s the Museum of the Book and Writing and the Story Museum. But there is also the Ethnographic Museum, run by a local scholar of regional folklore, Joaquín Díaz, that’s set in a 18th century mansion. The nearby Museum of Music houses ancient and valuable instruments from across Europe and around the world. Finally, the e-LEA Centre hosts exhibits and lectures on literature and writing. While already a center of learning and history, Urueña made a conscious decision to become a Villa del Libro in 2007. It joined the International Organization of Book Towns and modeled its re-branding after cities like Hay-on-Wye in Wales or Brevedoort in the Netherlands where tens of thousands of tourists come every year for literary festivals or simply to look through the second-hand shops. So far Urueña is the only internationally recognized “book town” in Spain. At present, Urueña attracts 40,000 bibliophiles to its narrow medieval streets every year. They cross the vast plains of Castilla to search through old tomes; listen to lectures on writing and take classes in calligraphy, and of course to talk to one another about the pleasures found in books.

On Westernizing POC Cultural Fairytales

Anonymous asked: I am writing a story that transplants fairytales and myths to a wild west setting. I want to include non-european fairytales but I am concerned that it will come off as white washing, even if the characters are POC. How can I go about avoiding this?

So let me see if I have this right; you’re redesigning Non-European fairytales into a Wild West setting? It sounds like an interesting concept that could potentially become problematic.

Without knowing too many fine details of your tales vs. the original stories, I would simply suggest you remember to respect the original story as much as possible. For example I wouldn’t swap out items or objects of religious, social or cultural importance into westernized counterparts that are not so significant as it may veer into whitewashing.

I happen to be working on a fairytale retelling of mostly European tales with all WoC protagonists, which seems to be the opposite of what you’re doing. I’m enriching my retellings with some cultural aspects from the given Woman of Color’s culture and that of the European culture in which she’s also a part of and resides within. 

To do the exact opposite and swap PoC cultural aspects for that of the West might definitely reside as problematic, but again I don’t know what tales you’re writing and what may or may not be grazing into that territory.

My advice would be to keep an eye out for any areas that seem very cultural-specific so as to avoid re-dressing them in a Westernized coating so to speak. When it comes to the story-telling itself, such as plot, I don’t see much issue in taking that plot into a Wild West setting as long as you’re including the People of Color of which the tale comes from.

Disneyforprincesses has thoughts on a question similar(ish) to this.

~Mod Colette 

Sounds like cool concept and it definitely could work. I agree with Colette as far as [not] replacing items that hold significant value to their respective cultures to something with less significance in a Wild West setting. It also depends on what fairytales and folklore you plan on using. If it’s a specific story that has a high cultural significance, you would have to tread lightly on how you use the story.

If you do your research thoroughly, you could interweave culture and history into your story. I’m not sure what the format of your story is but it would be reasonable to have a Black cowboy fall into the role of characters from an African (or African-American) folktale or myth. It might do well to research what ethnic groups were in the “Wild West” during that time period and looking into the folktales from that specific culture.

As Colette said, I don’t think it would be whitewashing if you included the characters of color from which the folktale comes from.  

~Mod Najela

I think it would be hard to not have it be problematic, but I think this has some great advice.

~Mod Alice

“I enjoy seeing "racebent” Disney fanart, but I actually kind of dislike the idea of Disney taking European fairytales and moving them to different settings (like Princess and the Frog and Emperor’s New Groove). If they make more movies set in different countries, I think it’d be nice for them pick more non-European fairytales. Or stories that are Asian or African in origin. I think it’d be nice for people to be introduced to stories that are from different parts of the world.“

MOD NOTE: Inuit Elsa and Anna by queenchelly.

Mini Rant About Frozen in Once Upon A Time

I finally realised why this concept has been bothering me so much ever since I saw the last episode of season 3. (This is simply what I think, and if you don’t agree with me, then that is fine. I’m not trying to change your mind about anything. :P)

The thing is: OUAT is really good at being creative with the source material that they use, creating deep and relatable characters that are all based on well known works of literature. But some of the characters themselves or their respective story lines in OUAT may include references to the Disney movies: everything from names (Belle, Ariel, the dwarves’ names, ext), props (the shipped cup), to minor characters and plot arcs. There are very few things that are directly taken from the Disney movies themselves. Why? Because the characters are not based on the Disney versions (With minor exceptions like Jiminy). They are based on the originals that came over a century ago, but have been given new depth. The few hints of Disney’s influence has then been added on the surface. These sources that OUAT use wary from European fairytales to mythology, legends and novels, and the one thing that all these stories have in common is that they are all old classics. All of thees stories are at least a hundred years old, the youngest being (if I’m not mistaken) Peter Pan from 1902.  The Frozen characters on the other hand are NOT treated this way. OUAT’s Elsa and Anna are clearly not based on the original fairy tale of Hans C. Andersen, but are rather taken directly from the movie Frozen which came last year. These are not character that have been around for ages and then gotten an upgrade. They are literally Elsa and Anna from the film, forced to fit into the UOAT storyline. They even added Kristoff, Sven, Hans, the trolls, the dead parents - characters/sub-plots that are nowhere to be seen in the original story, once again showing that they are just ripping of the movie and avoiding the short novel, instead of the other way around like they have always done.  Frozen wasn’t even considered an adaption, but was categorised as an original screenplay, which makes the decision to add these characters to the series even more frustrating. I really get the feeling that the creators wanted to ride the success wave of Frozen and nothing more. Hopefully Elsa and Anna will not have too big of a part in the main plot, because I find their presence to be extremely distracting. :( PS - I am well aware that not all the sources have a Disney adaptation in existence. I never claimed otherwise. ( -_-)  EDIT 7/10: Apparently the show has now included a character whom is supposed to be the “real snow queen” from Andersen’s story. I have yet to see the episode and who knows, maybe it’s awesomely written, but that does NOT excuse the blatant money-grab use of Elsa and Co. A few days ago I was thinking about all the times Emma has mentioned the fact that all the storybook characters exist in works of fiction in her world. Then I tried to imagine her reaction when confronted with Elsa and instead of saying “Oh, yeah! Your story has been around for ages” she says “Yeah, your movie came out a few months ago! I have yet to see it myself, but I promise that I’ll rent it soon.” You see what I mean when I say that Frozen is treated differently compared to the other stories? (ó_Ò)
Dear Mattel(specifically the EAH crew),

Can you please make the next character you introduce NOT be from a European fairytale, please?

I mean, I get it. There’s a metric hex ton of fairy tales and folklore from Europe and they’re easily the most well know but really guys throwing in someone from a different continent can’t be that hard especially now that you’re adding characters who are the children of a literal playing card and a mirror.

molliehaswords  asked:

Which would be better: applying a European fairytale to a non-European culture/region (like Snow White in the Andes) OR a "fairytale" native to a specific culture set in that culture?

I would say the second.

But regardless, I think if Disney wants to showcase a specific culture, they need to involve many members of that culture on all levels of production. They need to make sure that elements, from writing to character design to animation to advertising aren’t offensive to that culture and instead showcase that culture in a truthful, respectful and exciting light. 

TBH along with that  I would also like to see films that showcase POC without being connected to any real world culture. Like, except for Jasmine, all of the WOC princesses are connected to specific cultures in specific settings as a means to justify their existence, if that makes sense.

That’s kind of way the first option you gave is kind of appealing. What happens if we take the Red Shoes or a variation of Hansel & Gretel, or the Golden Goose or any other European fairytale, and set it in a generic medieval setting, but make the characters POC? Just POC existing in fantasy worlds the way we’ve allowed white characters to do over and over again.

It would open doors to POC being included in fantasy in all areas the way white people are (white people in fantasy are not restricted to cultural legends the way POC are) and include a broader range of stories for POC to be involved in.

Specifically talking about the United States, so much of our cultural mindset as a country comes from media nowadays. Where myths and legends used to be a huge marker in culture, now it’s films, books and tv shows. Allowing POC to not just be background characters, but to STAR in films with sweeping fantasy settings that have a Game of Thrones or Lord of the Rings vibe gives POC footholds to cement themselves within a broader American culture, which I think is important on a multitude of levels.

-Lauren

“I still haven’t seen Frozen because I’m too upset at the fandom. I hate that so many people insist that poc can’t be in european fairytales or grasp at straws to deny that Anna, Elsa, and their mom are carbon copies of each other and the more people assert this, the less I want to see it. I don’t remember the fandoms for Tangled or Brave being this bad, why is Frozen so much worse?”

anonymous asked:

Thing is, even if you stick to "traditional European fairytales", there's no reason to KEEP them set in Europe. You just need places have the main plot items. The Snow Queen could be anywhere with snow. Rapunzel could be anywhere with towers. Cinderella requires upper-class formal events. Beauty and the Beast just requires remote nobility and trickster figures. Loads of places have these, not just Europe.

It is known scientific fact that (like humans and dinosaurs) people of color and dancing candles have never coexisted. You can only stretch the limits of the imagination so far.

Most of the Disney princesses are white because they are from Europe. The Brothers Grimm went around Europe and collected tales so that future generations could enjoy them. I do consider their fairytales european culture, even german culture. 
So yes, the princesses should be white if the are using one of these tales. I am all for diversity so how about a disney film that does something right and stops using grimms fairytales.
I am no longer willing to feel bad because of the fact that I don’t like the way people just forget that these fairytales belong to my culture. 

anonymous asked:

You're just a typical white girl appropriating Japanese culture. You're not social or unique.

first of all, not really sure where this is coming from.  if eating sushi, watching japanese documentaries, reading manga, & enjoying japanese art is considered appropriation… guilty as charged!  you caught me!   :)  having said that, the idea of cultural appropriation doesn’t exist in japanese culture, so you need to stop thinking about japanese correctness through a mode of american thought.  if anything, the japanese LOVE cultural exchange.  a lot of their culture is borrowed from chinese, french, finnish, korean, american, & british culture/pasttimes/music/dress/food/technology, yet made uniquely japanese (an obvious example is lolita fashion, which derives from the french rococo movement, or mori kei, which derives from european fairytales, or ramen noodles, which translates loosely to “chinese-style noodle” as it was borrowed directly from there).  In terms of other people “using” their culture, the majority of japanese people are honored because they are so proud of being japanese that they delight in others seeing the beauty of it too.  at least it has been this way in my experience.  when i traveled in japan, people were really excited to see me wearing japanese-style dress and wanted to take pictures of me to send to their families.  a couple people i was talking to at a cafe became ecstatic when i told them that people in california love studio ghibli & jpop.  they don’t see it as an insult, they see it as a form of flattery.  remember that avril lavigne “hello kitty” video that everyone (see also: white americans that don’t know what they’re talking about) got all upset about?  did anyone bother to research the japanese response?   it had a favorable response and was considered a tribute.  they were confused as to why the western world was so upset.  so, before you rush to conclusions about how the japanese feel, make sure you know how they feel first.  i leave you in the words of the ambassador of kawaii herself, her holiness kyary pamyu pamyu, “I want to spread the word of kawaii to the rest of the world — I want to see it embraced by everybody ”.

Also, this article from The Japan Times about how not only are Japanese people not offended by so called “orientalism” or “appropriation”, it’s hurting their businesses because it affects their ability to sell to western markets

The only time it’s not okay to wear a kimono is if you are pretending to be japanese as a mockery.  Don’t believe me?  Ask Japan.