anonymous asked:

I hope you have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, because being a part of a church won't get you into heaven, nor will just praying the rosary.

It would be kind of hard to NOT have a personal relationship with Jesus Christ, when I consume the Body and Blood of Christ in the Eucharist every Catholic Mass that He established during the Last Supper, and affirmed this Truth in the bible over, and over…and over…

“Never be afraid of loving the Blessed Virgin too much. You can never love her more than Jesus did.”
– St.Maximilian Kolbe

God acted silently and secretly, bringing into being a creature to be his mother so beautiful, that hell trembled and the heavens sighed.
- Fr. Steve Grunow

10

Jesus is truly, fully present in the Eucharist

The Eucharist is a sacrament in which, by the marvelous conversion of the whole substance of bread into the Body of Jesus Christ, and that of wine into His precious Blood, is contained truly, really, and substantially, the Body, the Blood, the Soul and Divinity of the same Lord Jesus Christ, under the appearance of bread and wine as our spiritual food.

The doctrine of the Real Presence is based upon the words of Jesus when he instituted the Eucharist at the Last Supper. When Jesus took the bread, he said, “This is my body” (Mt 26:26), and when he took a cup filled with wine, he said, “This is my blood” (Mt 26:28). Jesus did not say that this looks like my body, or that it is a reminder of my body, or that it is a symbol of my body. He said, “This is my body.” If we accept Jesus’ words, the Eucharist truly is his body and he is really present. This cannot be explained factually or scientifically. There are no proofs, no evidence. It is a profound mystery and a matter of faith. St. Cyril of Alexandria wrote, “Do not doubt whether this is true, but rather receive the words of the Savior in faith, for since he is truth, he cannot lie” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, No. 1381).

What Jesus declared at the Last Supper, the Church has repeated, retaught, re-emphasized, and reinforced again and again, particularly at the thirteenth session of the Council of Trent on October 11, 1551. The Council declared, “By the consecration of the bread and wine there takes place a change of the whole substance of the bread into the substance of the body of Christ our Lord and of the whole substance of the wine into the substance of his blood. This change the holy Catholic Church has fittingly and properly called transubstantiation” (Catechism of the Catholic Church, No. 1376). “In the most blessed sacrament of the Eucharist … the whole Christ is truly, really, and substantially contained” (Catechism, No. 1374)