ethnologic

Archaeologists Unearth a 70000 Year Old African Settlement

A group of Polish Archaeologists working for the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology in Poznan have managed to uncover the remains of a 70000 year old African settlement in Northern Sudan. This discovery is believed to completely contradict all theories and previous findings about life in Africa. Researchers state that the present belief was that that permanent structures were associated to the Great Exodus out of Africa and the process of occupying much cooler territories in Asia and Europe. No wonder, the entire world is looking at the developments of this excavation project with utmost interest.

The excavation site has been termed as Affad 23. It is currently known to be the only permanent settlement in the entire Nile Valley which shows that homo sapiens had built sizeable permanent structures and successfully adapted to the conditions and temperatures of the wetland environment. The evidence also points to a direction that makes it clear that human development and the process of adaptation to the surrounding environment was much more advanced in Africa during the Middle Palaeolithic era than what was previously believed.

According to Dr. Marta Osypinska, the project director of Affad 23, the discoveries made in the project are unique. She further stated that the team came across certain wooden structures last season as well. However, it was only this year that they managed to pinpoint the exact location of this 70000 year old African settlement and also manage to identify a range of utility areas such as a space for cutting animal carcasses and a large flint workshop. The fact that both these utilities were located at a considerable distance from the settlement also showcases the kind of intellect that the people of the era had.

Researchers are currently working on the various animal species that were hunted by early humans. According to reports, despite their simple flint tools that were manufactured using the Levallois method, these early humans managed to hunt dangerous animals such as hippos, buffalos and elephants as well as small animals such as monkeys, cane rats and other rodents that lived the wetlands.

Dr. Marta Osypinska also stated that the researchers plan to date the exact time period during which the early humans lived in this settlement using optically stimulated luminescence. She states that it is already known that the Middle Palaeolithic settlements in Affad came about during the end of the wet period, as is already indicated by the animals that were hunted and other environmental data. However, what makes it confusing is that these ecological conditions occurred two times in history – once about 25 millennia ago and once about 75 millennia ago. Determining which of these time frames the Affad 23 site belonged to is the most important objective of this project. Piotr Osypinski, a pre-history expert, believes that the answer to this question might even change the way the world looks at history.

Scientists from the Oxford Brookes University are working in tandem with the Polish archaeologists in order to analyze the geological history of the surrounding area and determine the environmental conditions that prevailed in the Nile region around the late Pleistocene era. This should help them to identify the factors that allowed the Affad 23 site to preserve itself over the millenniums.

4

8 Agosto Hanoi

Il giorno extra ad Hanoi si è rivelato molto produttivo.
Alcuni di noi hanno visitato il museo etnologico e il museo di belle arti, mentre altri sono andati a vedere ciò che resta della città imperiale.
Entrambi i musei erano davvero belli, il museo etnologico (40000 Dong) è definito dalla guida come uno dei migliori musei del Vietnam, ed è in effetti molto interessante e ben fatto. Propone una panoramica sulla cultura delle 54 etnie presenti in Vietnam, dividendole per i 5 ceppi linguistici a cui appartengono.
Anche il museo di belle arti (20000 Dong) merita una visita, soprattutto per il primo piano dove sono esposte le opere più antiche.
Alle 11 di sera è partito il treno notturno che ci ha portato a Dong Hoi, la stazione ferroviaria più vicina al parco naturale di Phong Nha-Ke Bang, dove ci sono le grotte più grandi del mondo.

(Tra le foto un disegno fatto da due nostri Tommasi, Spugna e Thomas Cian, al museo di belle arti)

Archaeology Interview: Harvard Indian College
  • Archaeology Interview: Harvard Indian College
  • Stuff You Missed in History Class
Play

Holly interviews two archaeologists from Harvard University in today’s episode: Patricia Capone and Diana Loren. As part of an ongoing project with Harvard’s Peabody Museum of Ethnology and Archeology, these two women — along with students studying archaeology — participate in an active archaeological dig to find and document Harvard’s Indian College.

Here’s Harvard’s Digging Veritas online exhibit.

And here’s a link to our show notes.

Images courtesy Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology, copyright President and Fellows of Harvard College

20150512-M7-NOCT-400TMY-HC110B copy by Days of My Ordinary Life (Vincent)
Via Flickr:
Photo exhibition by a French photographer, Jean - Marie Duchange. He used a Rolleiflex to take photos of landscapes and ethnic minority people of Vietnam’s Central Highlands from 1952 to 1955. Leica M7 Noctilux @ f/1.0 Kodak T-MAX 400

Meda Songs.

Archives of Aboriginal Knowledge. Containing all the original paper laid before Congress respecting the history, antiquities, language, ethnology, pictography, rites, superstitions, and mythology, of the Indian tribes of the United States


Henry Rowe Schoolcraft
Philadelphia: J.B. Lippincott & Co., 1860.

If you want a wider view of the panorama of minority languages and/or indigenous languages that are constantly attacked and devalued for their ‘uselessness’ and/or that are at risk/at the verge of extinction, go visit the Ethnologue ( https://www.ethnologue.com ).
It keeps track and has information (sometimes very basic, I must say) of more than 7000 living languages and their status as minority/endangered/dying/etc.
As a linguist, I am a fierce defender of these languages. We need to defend those languages. People don’t know how much culture a language carries inside but we are losing cultures at a horribly fast pace due to the tendency of making one language that encompasses every important thing in the world, one that makes it undoubtly easier for all of us to access to information and knowledge that a lot of people would have been unable to access otherwise, but this need of equalization also discriminates those who can’t learn the One language and it literally erases languages too and sometimes even makes them become extinct, then proceeding to an inevitable future shrinkage of the knowledge we sought through the One language, which simply doesn’t have the ability of carrying every culture that every language that it erased carried within.
Defend minority languages, indigenous languages, languages that are at risk of extinction, devalued languages, ‘useless’ languages…
Please. Defend culture.

peruthisweek.com
Chornancap priestess origin to be discovered
By Hillary Ojeda

The priestess ruled the Lambayeque region 1,200 years ago.

The Chornancap priestess has long been a mystery for archaeologists and historians of Peruvian ancient history. Since her tomb was discovered in 2011, her origins have been uknown-that’s all about to change.

A team of specialists at Harvard University is set to analyze theDNA of the Chornancap priestess from Lambayeque to pin down her origins, reports Andina news agency.

The priestess was at one point a ruler over the Lambayeque region and was buried with grave goods and other bodies that suggest she was a woman of great significance.

“These DNA tests are aimed at determining if the eight companions found in the priestess’ tomb are her relatives, and if they are native from the area or come from other regions,” he said.

Specialists from the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology at Harvard will therefore analyze the DNA sequences and examine the biochemical irrigation patterns, says Carlos Wester La Torre, director of the Brüning National Archaeological Museum.

At the moment Peru does not have the physical and chemical analysis equipment sufficient to analyze ancient remains, reports Andina.

vimeo

Deep Forest - Sweet Lullaby

In 1970 Swiss ethnomusicologist Hugo Zamp has been travelling the Solomon Island of Malaita to record traditional local chants. One of the songs he found was a lullaby called “Rorogwela”, sung by an older woman named Afunakwa. About two decades later, in 1992, French electronic world music duo Deep Forest sampled this tune to create “Sweet Lullaby”, a near-perfect piece of musical kitsch, that had some notable charts success (#10 in the UK single charts) and still doesn’t fail to take your breath away and send you on some self-forgotten voyage. The beautiful video was shot by Tarsem Singh, the later director of movies like The Cell or Mirror Mirror.

Archaeologists Unearth a 70,000 Year Old African Settlement


A group of Polish Archaeologists working for the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnology in Poznan have managed to uncover the remains of a 70000 year old African settlement in Northern Sudan. This discovery is believed to completely contradict all theories and previous findings about life in Africa. Researchers state that the present belief was that that permanent structures were associated to the Great Exodus out of Africa and the process of occupying much cooler territories in Asia and Europe. No wonder, the entire world is looking at the developments of this excavation project with utmost interest.

The excavation site has been termed as Affad 23. It is currently known to be the only permanent settlement in the entire Nile Valley which shows that homo sapiens had built sizeable permanent structures and successfully adapted to the conditions and temperatures of the wetland environment. The evidence also points to a direction that makes it clear that human development and the process of adaptation to the surrounding environment was much more advanced in Africa during the Middle Palaeolithic era than what was previously believed.

According to Dr. Marta Osypinska, the project director of Affad 23, the discoveries made in the project are unique. She further stated that the team came across certain wooden structures last season as well. However, it was only this year that they managed to pinpoint the exact location of this 70000 year old African settlement and also manage to identify a range of utility areas such as a space for cutting animal carcasses and a large flint workshop. The fact that both these utilities were located at a considerable distance from the settlement also showcases the kind of intellect that the people of the era had.

Researchers are currently working on the various animal species that were hunted by early humans. According to reports, despite their simple flint tools that were manufactured using the Levallois method, these early humans managed to hunt dangerous animals such as hippos, buffalos and elephants as well as small animals such as monkeys, cane rats and other rodents that lived the wetlands.

Dr. Marta Osypinska also stated that the researchers plan to date the exact time period during which the early humans lived in this settlement using optically stimulated luminescence. She states that it is already known that the Middle Palaeolithic settlements in Affad came about during the end of the wet period, as is already indicated by the animals that were hunted and other environmental data. However, what makes it confusing is that these ecological conditions occurred two times in history – once about 25 millennia ago and once about 75 millennia ago.  Determining which of these time frames the Affad 23 site belonged to is the most important objective of this project. Piotr Osypinski, a pre-history expert, believes that the answer to this question might even change the way the world looks at history.

Scientists from the Oxford Brookes University are working in tandem with the Polish archaeologists in order to analyze the geological history of the surrounding area and determine the environmental conditions that prevailed in the Nile region around the late Pleistocene era. This should help them to identify the factors that allowed the Affad 23 site to preserve itself over the millenniums.

New Post has been published on http://www.arqueologiadelperu.com/dna-test-to-determine-ancient-chornancap-priestess-origin/

DNA test to determine ancient Chornancap priestess origin

Specialists from the Peabody Museum of Archaeology & Ethnology at Harvard University, United States will analyze DNA information from skeletal remains of Chornancap priestess, a woman of the greatest hierarchy yet discovered in the Lambayeque culture, in a bid to determine her genetic background.

The study will also research the leading figure’s relationship with the other buried people, found in the same funerary context.

The Chornancap priestess ruled this region of the country approximately 1200 years ago.

The bioarchaeology test will clarify different theories referred to this type of burials, which imply the elite figure was buried with her servants, while others believe the said bodies belong to her immediate family members.

According to Carlos Wester La Torre, director of the Brüning National Archaeological Museum, some samples will be sent to analyze DNA sequences and examine the biochemical irrigation patterns.

These DNA tests are aimed at determining if the eight companions found in the priestess’ tomb are their relatives, and if they are native from the area or come from other regions,” he said.

Wester went on to add that analysis will be conducted to at least two of the buried individuals.

He also said Peru has no physical and chemical analysis lab to analyze ancient remains, but the U.S., Japan and England do, and this is part of a cooperation project.