ethnic-girls

7

Happy international Women’s Day! 
just wanted to say that beauty is international, uniqueness and staying true to yourself - this what real beauty is.

and today I’d like to send a virtual hug to women and girls all over the world and remind all of you that WE ARE BEAUTIFUL, no matter the age, country or nationality!

have a great day and lets spread some love! 

Growing up with Ethnic Hair

I think i’ve cried over how much i hate my natural hair then i have over boys or getting injured. 

From the age of 9 I’ve been getting relaxer’s cause my puffy frizzy curly crazy hair was just to unmanageable and I was always made fun of for it when I did leave it natural.

In America girls with ethnic hair are taught to hate it and that it’s ugly. I’m 20 and I still cry over how much i hate my hair when I try to wear it natural. I can;t do anything with it, it’s just a frizzy mess all over the place.  I was never taught how to deal with it. Just how to make it straight and look like everyone else. 

I’m trying to grow it out cause its damaged and I want it longer, but I dont know if i can handle it. 

I feel so gross. 

And I know a lot of people that don’t have hair like mine just look at me like “oh its no big deal” but then are the ones to always be fucking touching my hair and laughing at me. 

:( meh i wish i had nice curly hair like some of the other ethnic chicks or just straight hair. But i have neither and I dont know how to make it look presentable. 

Musicals as Restaurants

Please take these with a grain of salt!

Hamilton - Chipotle 

Everyone has heard of it, even when there’s controversy around it people still go, and it’s undeniably ethnic but white girls love it.

Phantom of the Opera - McDonald’s

It’s the first example that comes to mind, has been running for a long, long time, and is of questionable quality.

Natasha, Pierre, and the Great Comet of 1812 - That One Weird Place 

Your friend swears that it’ll take off, but then it actually does?? And you thought no one liked it two months ago!

Dear Evan Hansen - Liquid Nitrogen Ice Cream Stores

Whoa this is sooooooo edgy!!! Definitely not done before!!!! Who’s heard of musicals about teen angst?? (But tbh you love it anyway)

Wicked - Burger King

Like McDonald’s, but not as old, good, or popular.

Feel free to add more!

anonymous asked:

Could you draw Chloe and Nadine taking their native, traditional clothing off?

Thank you for wonderful request! I was swept away in a deep study of the possible ethnic roots of our girls, and that’s what came of it
╮( ̄ω ̄;)╭

ok. We all know that Chloe is half Indian, this is the whole game devoted to) I love Indian costumes because they are completely embroidered with patterns, decorations and other ringing things.
About Nadine is only known that she is from South Africa, so I took the most numerous tribe - Zulu - and forgive me naughty dog if I did not guess.

And about the flag they hold. Did you know that both of their surnames, Ross and Frazer, come from Scotland? Well, now you know it = D

anonymous asked:

Hey i read in a interview with the director of that movie that she wanted to tell a story of how the fate of many black and biracial kids was affected by the holocaust; with many of them also ending up in concentration camps. And that the kid of an SS officer with whom the lead falls in love with is realizing as he gets older what horrors his regime is doing and can't understand it. Can you explain how this romanticizes Nazism?

thank you for asking. i appreciate that you want to learn more about this situation. it’s taken me a while to collect my thoughts, so here they are.

i’m usually a firm believer in both the power of love through adversity and the artistic rights of actors and filmmakers. i’m not trying to place blame on amandla stenberg or amma asante. however, this movie feels insensitive, exploitative, and extremely tasteless. every other jewish person i’ve discussed this with has had the exact same reaction. here’s why:

before she edited it, amandla’s post called the holocaust a “backdrop” for the love story. that’s right, the genocide of my people used as a narrative device to frame some sort of “forbidden” romeo/juliet type  relationship. in a world where fucking neo nazis are making a comeback i’m afraid i’m not so forgiving to situations like this. goy filmmakers have a long history of exploiting the holocaust and the suffering of jewish/romani people for the sake of furthering their own heroic narratives and i’m done with that bullshit. 

i’m aware that hitler youth was often compulsory for german children. i’m also aware that hitler’s doctrine threatened everyone perceived as “un-aryan”, not just jewish and romani people. the fate of poc, especially black and biracial people, in hitler’s germany is absolutely something worth talking about and exploring further. i’ve often advocated for studies of the holocaust include sections that discuss not only the complete jewish and romani experience, but also the experience of poc, lgbtq people, disabled people, and others affected. but to do it in a way that humanizes their oppressors, who are literal fucking nazis, is absolutely atrocious. there is no equal love between an oppressed person and their oppressors. 

in conclusion, nazism is not a hurdle for kids to overcome on their path to true love. nazism is an evil mindset that led to the deaths of 6 million of my people and millions of others as well. these deaths should never be a rhetorical device that goy filmmakers exploit for the sake of making their story feel more “forbidden”. being a nazi doesn’t mean you get to be a star-crossed lover. being a nazi means you should get punched in the face.

in conclusion, this ethnic jewish girl is fucking done with the romanticism and humanization of nazis. she’s fucking done. 

THEY LOOK AT US FUNNY

girls like us, 
blue gatorade girls in nikes, running
miles and miles but unsure what we’re
trying to get away from [it’s the extra curves
and bumps and inches in our genes, I mean
jeans, I mean
girls like kohl-jacket-girls in black doc martens 
that squeak just a little too loud, not metaphorically,
just a little too loud on tile, though the statement sure is a
statement; girls whose mommas work extra hard around
christmas to buy their daughters the name-brand combat boots
that squeak just a little too loud. girls who make statements
without thinking about making statements. girls like us, with
unruly hair since infancy, brown and coarse
and trailing down our spines like slithering snakes,
girls who were taught - through harsh words or
subliminal messages or subtle teen magazine advertising - to
hate the wild parts of them, before they could even begin
to understand what a beautiful thing it is to be uncontrollable,
unconquered.
they look at girls like us, with skin browner than theirs,
hair thicker than theirs, eyes darker than theirs, trauma
louder
than theirs, because we’re different,
because we radiate a foresty-golden glow in the sun
instead of pale against it, because we
had our bumpy middle eastern childhoods
with nothing to relate to and no one to understand,
and they
had their proud, sometimes by-the-book [and when it’s not, oh, the praise they get] american ones. girls like us, they
look at us different, smile at us different, eyes linger
just a second too long. i see the way
they look at me and they look at my momma, and wonder
about us. what makes us stand out around the people
who surround us, the men and women with criticism and
cynicism on their faces as they look
down on us, like they want to drain the life, the soul, the
different, 
out of us. girls like us, who grew up
admiring the lightness around us, the whiteness
around us, wanting it,
craving it like the rose water syrup and cardamom in
the pretty pastries my daddy and his family love that
no one that’s
not like us can pronounce. [we say “baklava” like
“buck-low-wuh” and i know the sound so good because
i used to hate it so much when my
mommy and daddy would speak their language
around other people and they would look at us funny,
look at us angrily, look at us nervously, i used to be
one of those girls that hated our language so much i could
never forget a single sound from it, a single
syllable] girls like us, who grew up envying the silky
flatness falling on the heads of the girls at school, girls like
us, who sent the moisture in our scalps to hell with
flat irons and
blow dryers, and “relaxing” treatments, but
I don’t want to relax, we don’t
WANT TO RELAX, momma, i wish they wouldn’t tell us
to relax momma, like me and you aren’t entitled to some
compassion just because we’re different, momma. i wish
i didn’t want to change my nose so bad, momma, daddy
probably feels really sad when i say that, since it’s just like his,
momma. girls like us who get to college and work full-time
at our dad’s stores to help them 
make it on their own in a country, in a land that
fought against them since they stepped foot on the 
pride-soaked soil; girls like us who count each penny in 
each pay check with a guilt like maybe, just maybe, we should
do it for free, since momma and daddy did everything to make
sure that, when we knew this world and how to be, that we
were
free. girls like us that collect the coins to pay for our own expenses,
college loans, car payment, the inevitable rhinoplasty we wanted since childhood, braces our families couldn’t afford, for us or our brothers and sisters, clothes, make-up.
because diversity isn’t enough sometimes to get a
broke colored girl into college for less - straight As or not, because
our fathers and mothers were not raised with handouts, and they’ll
be damned if we don’t break a sweat for our wheels, too, because our noses are too long, just a little off the top…because metal on our teeth
and bronzer on our cheeks and black on our arms to thin out our
silhouettes, but it's 
never been enough for
girls like us.
momma,
what did they do to
girls like us
who sprouted differently than the rest
to make us think that
just because our petals didn’t look like theirs,
that they were thorns and weeds
instead?

anonymous asked:

PSA if you say shit like: "I love ethnic women!" or "White girls aint just wild enough for me" It is not flattering, it is not flirty. You're being a gross douchebag, fetishising black women and the colour of their skin

Omg preach!!! I absolutely agree!!