ethnic people

Stop using this word.

It does not mean:

  • Free spirited
  • Traveller 
  • White girls dancing in fields wearing a long patterned skirt and crop top

It is:

  • A RACIAL SLUR. 
  • JUST as bad as the “n” slur, the “k” slur, or the “r” slur.

G*psy is a term used to derogatorily describe an ethnicity/people that everybody apparently forgets exists: the Romani. 

Stop using this slur on your shirts, jewellery, and in your metaphysical shops.

Stop using a terrible slur against a thriving people for your own profit or benefit. 

Stop using a slur against a thriving people to describe yourself as “Adventurous uwu”.

 Stop using this word.

You are not a “g*psy”

You are a fucking asshole.

Bakhtiar a  Kazakh boy on his way to the annual Eagle Festival with his family photography by ©Hamid Sardar - hamirsardarphoto.com

Mongolia’s far western province of Bayan-Ölgii, an area mainly inhabited by the Kazakh ethnic minority.

“From his series Dark Heavens, which celebrates the spiritual connection between Mongolia’s nomadic communities and their animals.”

Oranın sıcaklığı havasındadır.
Ben gidince bir şey değişmedi biliyorum.
Şad olsunlar hepsi suları alabalıkları ile.
…….
O köy yine kendi rüyasındadır.

Turgut Uyar

Görsel :  Harry Gruyaert - Magnum Photos Photographer

I think the real reason why Native suffering and oppression doesn’t get discussed is because it would require a lot of people in this country to really do some serious critical analysis of what this country and government has done and is still doing and that the thought is too heavy and unfathomable for them to even process it. So instead they make excuses, they make justifications, they blow off any and all talk about it, and they put the blame and contempt on us instead of our oppressors, because the reality of it all would just be too much for them to possibly comprehend.

And pardon me if I can’t sympathize with you for choosing to tune out something that is a reality for us every single day. You’re not listening, you don’t want to listen, and because of that people are still suffering and dying. I can’t be understanding and sympathetic towards you. Not when Indigenous women still go missing and murdered in Canada by the hundreds. Not when one in three of those women will be sexually assaulted at least once in their lifetime. Not when Native children are being kidnapped by the government and taken away from their families. Not when Hollywood still continues to churn out harmful stories and messages that degrade us further. Not when people on the reservations are killing themselves. 

Hate is not the opposite of love. Indifference is. And people have been VERY indifferent towards Indigenous people for a long time.

“white people have no culture!!”

oh

i’m sorry

what’s that?

i wasn’t

aware

that europeans

don’t have rich

and fascinating cultures

or that culture

has to comply

with tumblr’s definition

of what culture is

in order to be counted as legitimate

white people have tons of culture so shut the fuck up about white people “not having any culture”

Jerusalem (القدس) is the capital of Palestine. Israel is an apartheid state founded on the illegal occupation of Palestine by the Israeli military. Zionism is the racist & colonial ideology which justifies the ethnic cleansing of my people - the indigenous people of Palestine.

Mordvian girl in traditional dress. 1914, Russian Empire.

yellow-eyed-monsters  asked:

I have a question that may come out sounding kinda rude, but why can't writers write poc as people, put them through the same trials and tribulations as caucasian characters? This may come out sounding different that what I've asked in my head so if that's the case, I'm terribly sorry

Writing About PoC Trials and Tribulations

I understand where you’re coming from, because it looks unequal when you take it simply as “humans struggle, so why can’t we write about PoC struggling?”

What Topics To Avoid isn’t talking about struggle in general, which is where the confusion comes from.

Yes, you can write PoC struggling. This is not the question at hand.

What that post was pointing out is PoC struggle is rarely individual trials and tribulations like white characters.

When a white character struggles, they are struggling with something that is an individual struggle that is treated as a universal narrative for that person’s individual issues (like, everyone’s felt like an underdog at one point for various reasons). But if you look at the dominant stories for PoC, the struggle is directly because of their ethnicity, such as segregation, or a racial-based war, and/or colonialism, to name a few. The plot falls apart when the ethnicity/situation is changed.

We are asking you to look at why you are attracted to struggles that come directly as a result of being a certain ethnicity. 

Starcrossed lovers are fine, but why does every starcrossed lovers story involving a PoC have to be set at a time when interracial marriage was illegal, and/or in a setting where one side’s family hate the other for their skin tone?

An underdog with less experience is fine, but why does every underdog involving a PoC involve somebody who came from an impoverished background and low quality schools because it’s in a predominantly PoC neighbourhood?

The question we want white writers to ask is: “does my character struggle and experience pain primarily because of their ethnic background, does my character experience a unique struggle because of their ethnic background, or is my struggle primarily because of individual circumstances that are informed by the ethnicities at hand?”

If they experience a struggle primarily because of their ethnic background (ie- segregation), then that is a very nuanced narrative that should be left alone by outsiders because it’s exploiting another person’s pain for your plot.

If they experience a struggle heavily informed because of their ethnic background (ie- underdog because of racism, navigating a system that has particularly potent institutionalized racism like the psychiatric system), then that is an identity story that should be left alone by outsiders because it’s treating various isms (racism, classism, colourism) as a tragic backstory to overcome.

If they experience a struggle where their ethnicity plays a part but only minor events change if you switch around ethnicity (ie- starcrossed lovers where one side is very closed off), then it’s primarily because of individual circumstance that can be written by outsiders who do enough research.

I recently saw a very cute concept where a boy falls in love with a Muslim girl who keeps halal. He tried to win her heart by cooking, but she refused to eat it because it wasn’t halal. Once he discovered what the issue was, he learned all about halal cooking and made her halal meals to win her heart.

This story is only moderately informed by the girl’s customs. The story could be simply that she’s a picky eater, allergic to some foods, or has specific tastes. Because you can swap out a few things for it, this story isn’t About Being Muslim. The plot would’ve changed based on what it was, but the actual plot point could be anything.

But if there was a similar “guy falls for Muslim girl” situation and his family was Islamophobic, that would be using Islamophobia for plot pain and reinforcing all the gross stuff Muslims go through because of Islamophobia.

Hope that clears things up.

~ Mod Lesya

types of trans people who deserve respect and support for their names, pronouns, and gender identity:

  • trans people who don’t experience dysphoria
  • trans people who experience dysphoria
  • trans people who don’t want surgery
  • trans people who do want surgery
  • trans people who haven’t had surgery
  • trans people who have had surgery
  • trans people who don’t want to take hormones
  • trans people who do want to take hormones
  • trans people who aren’t on hormones
  • trans people who are on hormones
  • trans people who transitioned all at once
  • trans people who transitioned/are transitioning slowly
  • trans people who aren’t transitioning in the traditional sense
  • trans people who aren’t transitioning at all
  • trans people who don’t pass
  • trans people who do pass
  • trans people who are stealth
  • trans people who are closeted
  • trans people who are loud and open about being out
  • trans people who are only out in some contexts
  • trans people who want to come out
  • trans people who don’t want to come out
  • trans people whose presentation doesn’t match that of the expectations surrounding their assigned gender
  • trans people whose presentation matches that of the expectations surrounding their assigned gender
  • trans people whose presentation doesn’t match that of the expectations surrounding their gender identity
  • trans people whose presentation does match that of the expectations surrounding their gender identity
  • trans people who don’t identify with any gender
  • trans people who sometimes or partially identify with their assigned gender
  • trans people who don’t identify as their assigned gender
  • trans people who are binary women
  • trans people who are binary men
  • trans people who are nonbinary
  • trans people who are genderqueer
  • trans people who don’t really know where they fit under the trans umbrella but still know they’re trans
  • trans people who are still figuring out what being trans means to them
  • trans people who use multiple gender labels to describe themselves
  • trans people who use pronouns associated with their assigned gender
  • nonbinary trans people who use she/her and/or he/him pronouns
  • trans people who use they/them pronouns
  • trans people who use it/its pronouns
  • trans people who use nounself pronouns
  • trans people who use neopronouns
  • trans people who use no pronouns
  • trans people who use multiple sets of pronouns
  • trans people who switch between different sets of pronouns
  • trans people who use the name they were given at birth
  • trans people who use a name other than one they were given at birth
  • trans people who use multiple names
  • trans people who use names from their culture or heritage
  • trans people whose ethnic or cultural background plays a role in their trans identity
  • trans people of color
  • jewish trans people
  • muslim trans people
  • rromani trans people
  • trans people with disabilities
  • physically disabled trans people
  • neurodivergent trans people
  • mentally ill trans people
  • chronically ill trans people
  • trans people whose disabilities play a role in their trans identity
  • queer trans people
  • polyamorous trans people
  • aspec trans people
  • mspec trans people
  • gay trans people
  • straight trans people
  • trans people not listed above (feel free to reblog and add on !!)
  • every single trans person ever
  • literally all of them
  • and if you’re trans and reading this, you too !! 💜💜

Mutluyum , öptüm kadınları,
otlarda süründüm , çiçekleri çiğnedim. Ve küçük kardeşlerimiz gibi,
hayvanları  başlarına vurarak dövmedim

Sergey Yesenin

Görsel :  A shepherd leads his herd back from grassland in the Talesh mountain area, close to the Caspian Sea, in Iran on December 19, 2016.

“Umut bir güvence biçimi değildir; bir enerji şeklidir ve çok karanlık koşullardaki enerjinin en güçlüsüdür.”

John Berger

Görsel :  Lhasa Tibetian Woman