ethnic cuisines

4

Cultural Appropriation is a real, important, and harmful thing, but god damn if it’s not one of the most recklessly abused terms in the social justice lexicon.

Transcription under the cut for accessibility

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Lakota Fry Bread
Ingredients:
¼ cup sugar
3 teaspoons baking powder
2 cups flour
1 teaspoon salt
1 cup water (or just enough to make a soft dough)
Oil for frying
Mix all the dry ingredients together. Add water, mixing carefully. Divide the dough into four
pieces and pat each into a round, flat shape. Add 1-2 inches of oil to a large skillet and heat
to 350. Fry each round until crisp and brown on both sides.

August 30, 2017
  1. Leo
     First-aid kit
     Navy

  2. Aries
     Guitar
     Grey

  3. Sagittarius
     Stationery shop
     Orange

  4. Libra
     Ethnic cuisine
     Green

  5. Gemini
     Pudding
     Gold

  6. Aquarius
     Planetarium
     Brown

  7. Virgo
     Parasol
     Silver

  8. Cancer
     Beer garden
     Purple

  9. Pisces
     Sunflowers
     Beige

  10. Scorpio
     Youth song
     White

  11. Taurus
     Safety pin
     Red

  12. Capricorn
     Towel blanket
     Black

I’m so sorry about yesterday’s Oha Asa! I was too busy and couldn’t get around to doing it. I hope I didn’t cause any inconveniences for anyone.

the-allegorxst  asked:

Hello! May I ask for some help from you? I'm an 18 year old female and, well, I wish to transition to a vegan diet but I'm not sure how. What inspired me to make this change was a research paper I'm working on about the food industry and honestly all that my research has revealed to me scares me. It basically turned me off from eating animal products entirely. I'd really appreciate the help! ♥

Hi there the-allegorxst that’s awesome! :)

As any change, any drastic shifts in our lives require a lot of support and a huge commitment to stay on track. Review the reasons, why do you want to change? The most important thing is to be clear about why you want to do this and to remember that you won’t find changes instantly, so perseverance is the key. Here are some tips that hopefully will help you! ❤

Tips:

  • Have a positive attitude.
  • Be clear about why you’re becoming a vegan.
  • Don’t be hard on yourself.
  • Exercise.
  • Understand the health benefits.
  • Don’t deprive yourself.
  • Investigate the science behind nutrition, food, and health.
  • Ask questions.
  • Make time to cook.
  • You will not find changes instantly, so have patience and stay calm.
  • Make self-denial a habit and not just a trend. If you intend to truly change yourself, you must make these steps a constant guide for the rest of your life. Even though you may feel righteous for sharing your lunch or doing your homework for a week, if you lapse back into your bad habits, all of your hard work has been in vain.
  • Write down what you want to achieve, for each day of the week chose a point to focus on, practicing self-control in baby steps is less overwhelming and you are more likely to stick to your changes.
  • Don’t forget to sleep well. It will keep you healthy and mentally fit, as well as giving you a break from the stress of thinking about your behavior.
  • Forgive yourself when you slip up. Humans are not perfect. Every moment is a new opportunity to start again.
  • Do not procrastinate or else it will become harder to stick to your new routine.
  • Understand that you function based on incentives and reasons. Make sure you understand to give yourself rewards and recognize the logic behind whatever it is you are doing.
  • Go at your own pace
  • Think of it as an evolution: Relax and learn to love to cook, explore new cuisines, and be adventurous with food. Most importantly, be easy on yourself. Don’t view a vegan lifestyle as the finish line but as an evolving process of conscious eating.
  • If you want, start quietly: Don’t announce what you are doing; focus on yourself and being conscious of your surroundings, body, and food addictions first.
  • Find a vegan support group: Tumblr offers a lot of vegan blogs and lovely people.
  • Don’t worry about getting enough protein: rich sources of concentrated protein include beans, soy products like tofu and seitan, quinoa, nuts, and hemp seeds.
  • Focus on vegetables (and fruits). Try to eat more healthy, whole foods to give your body the vital nutrients and antioxidants it needs.
  • Going vegan doesn’t mean deprivation.
  • Rethink how you shop for food: Many staples of a vegan diet like grains, beans, and nuts are cheap, and they usually store well if you buy them in bulk.
  • Try more ethnic foods: Asian cuisines have tantalizing plant-based options originating from the spread of Buddhism. Italian pasta; Ethiopian lentil stews; satisfying and spicy Indian curries; and Mexican veggie tacos, fajitas or burritos (“just hold the cheese”)
  • Experiment with new favorite foods: Vegan versions of your beloved recipes will inevitably have different tastes and textures from what you are used to. Instead, try to incorporate similar flavors in new dishes.
  • Get resourceful.
  • Enjoy the transition and don’t make it feel like a punishment or deprivation of food.
  • I always recommend trying to get rid of dairy first: Is the most difficult one since you’re addicted to it due to casomorphins.

Hopefully, this little list helps give you some ideas on how to stay motivated to eat healthily! 💜

9

Southern Slavic Cuisine
aka omnomnomnom

Mostly Serbian tho, since I got pics from Serbian fan page, but food is similar in the Balkans, all these are eaten in Bosnia, Macedonia, Croatia…differences are mostly in types of meat used, since Bosniaks are mostly Muslims, so they don’t eat pork. Here are some of the names of the meals shown in the pictures
Čvarci
Sarma
Punjene paprike-stuffed peppers. They can be stuffed with potatoes and then baked, or with meat and rice which are then cooked (similar to sarma)
Pita ispod sača- Burek made with sač
Kajmak
Sugared apples - now I don’t know if this is eaten elsewhere in world, I supposed it is but I couldn’t find anything in English about it, anywho it’s apples dipped in melted sugar and then cooled and eaten as a candy.

2

Soul Food is a term used for an ethnic cuisine, food traditionally prepared and eaten by African Americans of the Southern United States.

Many of the various dishes and ingredients included in “soul food” are also regional meals and comprise a part of other Southern US cooking, as well. The style of cooking originated during American slavery. African slaves were given only the “leftover” and “undesirable” cuts of meat from their masters (while the white slave owners got the meatiest cuts of ham, roasts, etc.).

They also had only vegetables grown for themselves. After slavery, many, being poor, could afford only off-cuts of meat, along with offal. Farming, hunting and fishing provided fresh vegetables, fish and wild game, such as possum, rabbit, squirrel and sometimes waterfowl. Africans living in America at the time (and since) more than made do with the food choices they had to work with. Dishes or ingredients commonly found in soul food include: Biscuits (a shortbread similar to scones, commonly served with butter, jam, jelly, sorghum or cane syrup, or gravy; used to wipe up, or “sop,” liquids from a dish). Black-eyed peas (cooked separately or with rice, as hoppin’ john). Catfish (dredged in seasoned cornbread and fried). Chicken (often fried with cornmeal breading or seasoned flour) Collard greens (usually cooked with ham hocks, often combined with other greens). Grits, often served with fish. Neckbones (beef neck bones seasoned and slow cooked). Okra: (African vegetable eaten fried in cornmeal or stewed, often with tomatoes, corn, onions and hot peppers). Turnip greens (usually cooked with ham hocks, often combined with other greens).

Though soul food originated in the South, soul food restaurants — from fried chicken and fish “shacks” to upscale dining establishments-are in every African-American community in the nation, especially in cities with large black populations, such as Chicago, New York, New Orleans, Los Angeles and Washington, DC.

Slave Women Processing Pork on Wessyngton Plantation Source: http://www.wessyngton.com/blog/tag/slave-women-in-the-south/

Soul Food History: http://www.aaregistry.org/historic_events/view/soul-food-brief-history

noxindevelopment  asked:

Hello there I was perusing the vegan tag an wanted to ask what steps you took to change your diet. Right now my health is poor and i'm probably hurting myself or worst by continuing the typical omnivorous diet. i wanna improve my diet but what steps can a wannabe vegetarian take to get started.(Is ketchup horrible for your health)

Hello there noxindevelopment! :)

Here are some tips that might help; I went vegan overnight and I didn’t have any problems but that depends directly on how do you adopt changes in your life, you can give it a try and if it feels overwhelming you can take it step by step.

Tips:

  • Have a positive attitude.
  • Be clear about why you’re becoming a vegan.
  • Don’t be hard on yourself.
  • Exercise.
  • Understand the health benefits.
  • Don’t deprive yourself.
  • Investigate the science behind nutrition, food, and health.
  • Ask questions.
  • Make time to cook.
  • You will not find changes instantly, so have patience and stay calm.
  • Make self-denial a habit and not just a trend. If you intend to truly change yourself, you must make these steps a constant guide for the rest of your life. Even though you may feel righteous for sharing your lunch or doing your homework for a week, if you lapse back into your bad habits, all of your hard work has been in vain.
  • Write down what you want to achieve, for each day of the week chose a point to focus on, practicing self-control in baby steps is less overwhelming and you are more likely to stick to your changes.
  • Don’t forget to sleep well. It will keep you healthy and mentally fit, as well as giving you a break from the stress of thinking about your behavior.
  • Forgive yourself when you slip up. Humans are not perfect. Every moment is a new opportunity to start again.
  • Do not procrastinate or else it will become harder to stick to your new routine.
  • Understand that you function based on incentives and reasons. Make sure you understand to give yourself rewards and recognize the logic behind whatever it is you are doing.
  • Go at your own pace
  • Think of it as an evolution: Relax and learn to love to cook, explore new cuisines, and be adventurous with food. Most importantly, be easy on yourself. Don’t view a vegan lifestyle as the finish line but as an evolving process of conscious eating.
  • If you want, start quietly: Don’t announce what you are doing; focus on yourself and being conscious of your surroundings, body, and food addictions first.
  • Find a vegan support group: Tumblr offers a lot of vegan blogs and lovely people.
  • Don’t worry about getting enough protein: rich sources of concentrated protein include beans, soy products like tofu and seitan, quinoa, nuts, and hemp seeds.
  • Focus on vegetables (and fruits). Try to eat more healthy, whole foods to give your body the vital nutrients and antioxidants it needs.
  • Going vegan doesn’t mean deprivation.
  • Rethink how you shop for food: Many staples of a vegan diet like grains, beans, and nuts are cheap, and they usually store well if you buy them in bulk.
  • Try more ethnic foods: Asian cuisines have tantalizing plant-based options originating from the spread of Buddhism. Italian pasta; Ethiopian lentil stews; satisfying and spicy Indian curries; and Mexican veggie tacos, fajitas or burritos (“just hold the cheese”)
  • Experiment with new favorite foods: Vegan versions of your beloved recipes will inevitably have different tastes and textures from what you are used to. Instead, try to incorporate similar flavors in new dishes.
  • Get resourceful.
  • Enjoy the transition and don’t make it feel like a punishment or deprivation of food.
  • I always recommend trying to get rid of dairy first: Is the most difficult one since you’re addicted to it due to casomorphins.

Hopefully, this little list helps give you some ideas on how to stay motivated to eat healthily! 💜

So you walk into the new Korean joint around the corner and discover that (gasp) the head chef is a white guy from Des Moines. What’s your gut reaction? Do you want to walk out? Why?

The question of who gets to cook other people’s food can be squishy — just like the question of who gets to tell other people’s stories. (See: The whole controversy over the casting of the new Nina Simone biopic.)

For some non-white Americans, the idea of eating “ethnic cuisine” (and there’s a whole other debate about that term) not cooked by someone of that ethnicity can feel like a form of cultural theft. Where does inspiration end? When is riffing off someone’s cuisine an homage, and when does it feel like a form of co-opting? And then there’s the question of money: If you’re financially benefiting from selling the cuisine of others, is that always wrong?

When Chefs Become Famous Cooking Other Cultures’ Food

Photo: Sergi Alexander/Getty Images
Caption: Rick Bayless is a master of Mexican cuisine. He’s also a white guy from Oklahoma. Over the years, that has made him the target of criticism. 

“East Meets West” Example Essay

This was written for the U. of Michigan supplemental “community” essay prompt, then adapted for a (no longer existent) essay for Brown. The Michigan prompt reads:

Everyone belongs to many different communities and/or groups defined by (among other things) shared geography, religion, ethnicity, income, cuisine, interest, race, ideology, or intellectual heritage. Choose one of the communities to which you belong, and describe that community and your place within it.


Here’s the essay:

I look around my room, dimly lit by an orange light. On a desk in the left corner, a framed picture of an Asian family is beaming their smiles, buried among US history textbooks and The Great Gatsby. A Korean ballad streams from a pair of tiny computer speakers. Pamphlets of American colleges are scattered about on the floor. A cold December wind wafts a strange infusion of ramen and leftover pizza. On the wall in the far back, a Korean flag hangs besides a Led Zeppelin poster.

Do I consider myself Korean or American?

A few years back, I would have replied: “Neither.” The frustrating moments of miscommunication, the stifling homesickness, and the impossible dilemma of deciding between the Korean or American table in the dining hall, all fueled my identity crisis.

Standing in the “Foreign Passports” section at JFK, I have always felt out of place. Sure, I held a Korean passport in my hands, and I loved kimchi and Yuna Kim and knew the Korean Anthem by heart. But I also loved macaroni and cheese and LeBron and knew all the Red Hot Chili Peppers songs by heart. Deep inside, I feared that I would simply be labeled as what I am categorized at airport customs: a foreigner in all places.

This ambiguity of existence, however, has granted me the opportunity to absorb the best of both worlds. Take a look at my dorm room. This mélange of cultures in my East-meets-West room embodies the diversity that characterizes my international student life.

I have learned to accept my “ambiguity” as “diversity,” as a third-culture student embracing both identities in this diverse community that I am blessed to be a part of.

Do I consider myself Korean or American?

Now, I can proudly answer: “Both.”

anonymous asked:

What are some tips for being a vegan I want to start being one but I love meat idk why and not to long ago I saw a documentary on saluter house and I want to stop eating meat any tips for a beginner vegan? Pros and cons?

The most important thing for you is knowing and understanding what is a plant based diet and how it works. I started by watching a lot of documentaries, the more I watched the more I wanted to learn. Here are some useful resources that you may want to give a try:

  • Have a positive attitude.
  • Be clear about why you’re becoming a vegan.
  • Don’t be hard on yourself.
  • Exercise.
  • Understand the health benefits.
  • Don’t deprive yourself.
  • Investigate the science behind nutrition, food and health.
  • Ask questions.
  • Make time to cook. 
  • Go at your own pace
  • Think of it as an evolution: Relax and learn to love to cook, explore new cuisines, and be adventurous with food. Most importantly, be easy on yourself. Don’t view a vegan lifestyle as the finish line, but as an evolving process of conscious eating.
  • If you want, start quietly: Don’t announce what you are doing; focus on yourself and being conscious of your surroundings, body, and food addictions first.
  • Find a vegan support group: Tumblr offers a lot of vegan blogs and lovely people.
  • Don’t worry about getting enough protein: rich sources of concentrated protein include beans, soy products like tofu and seitan, quinoa, nuts, and hemp seeds.
  • Focus on vegetables (and fruits): Many who claim to be vegetarian or vegan are really starch-atarians filling meat voids with pasta, fries, bread. Try to eat more healthy, whole foods to give your body the vital nutrients and antioxidants it needs.
  • Going vegan doesn’t mean deprivation.
  • Rethink how you shop for food: Many staples of a vegan diet like grains, beans, and nuts are cheap, and they usually store well if you buy them in bulk.
  • Try more ethnic foods: Asian cuisines have tantalizing plant-based options originating from the spread of Buddhism. Italian pastas; Ethiopian lentil stews; satisfying and spicy Indian curries; and Mexican veggie tacos, fajitas or burritos (“just hold the cheese”)
  • Experiment with new favorite foods: Vegan versions of your beloved recipes will inevitably have different tastes and textures from what you are used to. Instead try to incorporate similar flavors in new dishes.
  • Get resourceful.
  • Enjoy the transition and don’t make it feel like a punishment or deprivation of food. 
  • I always recommend trying to get rid of dairy first: Is the most difficult one since you’re addicted to it due to casomorphines. 

Keep reading

Survey 186

Reblog | Bold what applies;

I love the taste of garlic in food, but garlic breath grosses me out so much.
I really enjoy old horror movies.
I keep on remembering songs I haven’t listened to in years because of Songpop.
^Which is the first Facebook game I have ever enjoyed…
Mikhail Baryshnikov is one of my idols.
English is not my first language, but usually people can’t tell immediately.
I have a secret notebook which no one even knows exists and I would rather die than have anyone read it.
My current roommates are the best I’ve had so far.
Good posture really attracts me in someone of my preferred gender.
^As do strong, maintained eyebrows.
I can’t really function with an Apple computer, lack of experience with those.
I don’t feel emotions the way ”normal” people do.
I don’t own a soft wallet, mine is plastic.
I tend to date men with power positions when it comes to their jobs.
No matter how hard I try, I seem to be unable to whistle.
Good manners are quite important to me.
I was once very involved in a certain sport.
I actually really enjoy cleaning my ears.
I refuse to eat ketchup on anything.
I often sigh really loudly by accident.
I much prefer the colder seasons to summer.
When I feel extra fancy, I fishtail my hair. It is incidentally the fanciest thing I can do with it.
I am a master at getting along with people when I try, because I am very good at figuring out how they want me to react and what they expect me to say, and if I don’t care about them and can’t be bothered to interact properly, I go into that mode.
I refuse to mow the grass, for some reason it terrifies me.
I get pretty bad seasonal allergies.
I don’t eat pork.
My blood type is O positive.
I have ghostly pale skin.
Singlespeed bikes are my favourite.
I have never used shaving cream in my entire life. I never saw any repercussions.
I feel most people I have met in my life would do better if they toughened up.
I have a bigger problem with people who think that feminism has anything to do with hating or belittling men than with people who don’t identify to the feminist movement.
I have struggled with drug use in the past.
I have never used a credit card.
This year, I will vote for something on a national level.
There is absolutely no carpet in my flat.
Currently, I have no interest in learning how to drive.
The job I want to do after school is rather uncommon.
One of my favourite drinks is Kvass.
I cook a lot, and enjoy it very much.
I am a daddy’s girl, by far.
My longest relationship was a long-distance one.
One of my favourite bands is Iron Maiden.
I am unable to write in print, I actually have to stop and remember not to write in cursive after every letter.
When I was a child, I had the ”by myself” syndrome and refused any help from anyone to do whatever.
It still hasn’t changed much, haha.
My computer tends to overheat quite often.
Fiddler on the Roof is my favourite musical.
I have an incredibly high alcohol tolerance.
My phone is always dead.
Indian food is my favourite ethnic cuisine.
My mother works in psychology.
My father works in the cooking industry. He also works in the music industry.
I feel very hot at the moment, and I get anxiety when I’m too hot.
I’m pretty picky about things in general.
However, I refuse to pick a restaurant when asked.
I don’t bite my nails.
I have a piece of jewelry representing a flag on my body at all times.
I seldom shave my legs, my hair grows very slowly.
I used to be pretty active in the survey community, and only just recently came back.
Only one person in my family has had a serious disease such as cancer.
I have no idea how much I weigh.
Or how tall I am.

6

Moqueca is a very popular and traditional seafood soup from Brazil. This seafood stew is typically prepared by using any seafood like fish along with onions, garlic, tomatoes and cilantro. This is a slow cooked stew that is made without adding any extra water or fluids. There are various versions of this dish. Some popular versions include Espírito Santo state in the Southeast’s Moqueca Capixaba and Moqueca Baiana from Bahia state in the Northeast.

The history of moqueca can be traced back to 300 years ago, when Brazilians first invented this high protein stew. Traditionally, this soup was made by using different types of seafoods such as fish, lobster, and prawns. However, in modern times fish is the only prime ingredient of this stew.

3

Laufabrauð (leaf bread) is a traditional kind of Icelandic bread that is most often eaten in the Christmas season. Originating from northern Iceland but now eaten throughout the entire country, it consists of round, very thin flat cakes with a diameter of about 15 to 20 cm (6 to 8 inches), decorated with leaf-like, geometric patterns and fried briefly in hot fat or oil.

Laufabrauð can be bought in bakeries or made at home, either with ready-made dough or from scratch;patterns are either cut by hand or created using a heavy brass roller, the laufabrauðsjárn (“leaf bread iron”). Leaf bread making at home is 
usually a family undertaking and often an essential part of the Christmas preparations, where several generations gather and take part in the decorating.

watchmedrowm  asked:

My New Years resolution is to ease into veganism. Any tips on someone who's starting out?

Hi there! This is very exciting! Here are some advices that might help :)

  • Go at your own pace
  • Think of it as an evolution: Relax and learn to love to cook, explore new cuisines, and be adventurous with food. Most importantly, be easy on yourself. Don’t view a vegan lifestyle as the finish line, but as an evolving process of conscious eating.
  • If you want, start quietly: Don’t announce what you are doing; focus on yourself and being conscious of your surroundings, body, and food addictions first.
  • Find a vegan support group: Tumblr offers a lot of vegan blogs and lovely people.
  • Don’t worry about getting enough protein: rich sources of concentrated protein include beans, soy products like tofu and seitan, quinoa, nuts, and hemp seeds.
  • Focus on vegetables (and fruits): Many who claim to be vegetarian or vegan are really starch-atarians filling meat voids with pasta, fries, bread. Try to eat more healthy, whole foods to give your body the vital nutrients and antioxidants it needs.
  • Going vegan doesn’t mean deprivation.
  • Rethink how you shop for food: Many staples of a vegan diet like grains, beans, and nuts are cheap, and they usually store well if you buy them in bulk.
  • Try more ethnic foods: Asian cuisines have tantalizing plant-based options originating from the spread of Buddhism. Italian pastas; Ethiopian lentil stews; satisfying and spicy Indian curries; and Mexican veggie tacos, fajitas or burritos (“just hold the cheese”)
  • Experiment with new favorite foods: Vegan versions of your beloved recipes will inevitably have different tastes and textures from what you are used to. Instead try to incorporate similar flavors in new dishes.
  • Get resourceful.
  • Enjoy the transition and don’t make it feel like a punishment or deprivation of food. 
  • I always recommend trying to get rid of dairy first: Is the most difficult one since you’re addicted to it due to casomorphines. 

I hope this help you a little. Whenever you have doubts don’t hesitate to come back ok? :)