ergodicity

Maryam Mirzakhani

There are moments when we do not agree with what is happening around us… 

Maryam Mirzakhani (born May 3, 1977) is an Iranian-American mathematician and a professor of mathematics at Stanford University.

On 13 August 2014, Mirzakhani became both the first woman and the first Iranian honored with the Fields Medal, the most prestigious award in mathematics. The award committee cited her work in “the dynamics and geometry of Riemann surfaces and their moduli spaces”.


Her research topics include Teichmüller theory, hyperbolic geometry, ergodic theory, and symplectic geometry.

“3d chess”|“three dimensional chess”
“3d photo”|“stereo photo”|“stereo photography”|stereogram|stereoscope|“three dimensional photo”
4d|“fourth dimension”
“abductive inference”|“abductive logic”|“abductive reasoning”
“abstract game”
advaita|vedanta
“alan moore”
alife|“artificial life”
ambigram
anaglyph
anarchism|anarchy|anarchocommunism|anarchocapitalism
“anthropic principle”
anticryptography
apl
“appropriate technology”
aspergers|autism|“autistic spectrum”
atheism|humanism|“secular humanism”|agnosticism
“attention economy”
autodidact
“avram davidson”
“barrington bayley”
“beam robotics”
beanworld
behaviorism
bipolar
blissymbolics
“board game”
“board game system”
borges
buddhism
bulletball
cabell
calliagnosia
calvinball
“card game”
“card game system”
“cellular automata”
“charles sanders peirce”
“chess variant”|“fairy chess”
chumby
coffee
“cognitive ergonomics”
“colbert report”
combinatorics
comics|comix
“common lisp”
comprehensivism|generalism
conlang|“constructed language”|artlang
“construction toy”
“construction toy system”
“constructive living”
conworld
copyfight|copyleft
“cosmic encounter”
cosmology
crank|kook
“creative commons”
crossdisciplinary|interdisciplinary
cryonics
cryptozoology
cthulhu
“curta calculator”
damanhur
“dead media”
decktet
“deep time”
“dice life”|“dice living”|dicelife
discordian
discworld
diy
dog|puppy
“douglas hofstadter”
“d-total”
ebook
emacs
“ergodic literature”
+eris
escher
esolang|“esoteric language”
esperanto
“evolutionary psychology”
exobiology|xenobiology
exoself
“experimental mathematics”|“experimental math”
“fanucci deck”|“double fanucci”
“faster than light”|ftl
“finnegans wake”
“flying spaghetti monster”|fsm
+fnord
“free culture”
“free software”
furby
“game design”
games
“game systems”
gedankenexperiment|“thought experiment”
“general semantics”
“gene wolfe”
“general systems theory”
generalism|comprehensivism|omnology
geocaching
geometry
“getting things done”
glasperlenspiel|“glass bead game”|gbg
“global catastrophic risks”
gnosticism
gnu
gpl
“grayling good book”
“great books”
“greg egan”
gtd
“hale-evans”
“hard problem of consciousness”|“philosophical zombie”
“harry stephen keeler”
“headless way”|headlessness
“hipster pda”
“history of science”|“history of mathematics”
hypnagogia|hypnagogic
icehouse
immortalism|longevity
“inform 7”
“interactive fiction”|“text adventure”
“james joyce”
“jon stewart”|“daily show”
kaizen
kennings
“king in yellow”
k'nex|knex
korzybski
labyrinth|maze
“laws of form”|“spencer brown”
lego
letterboxing
“lewis carroll”
“life hack”|lifehack
+lincos
linux
lisp
“literate programming”
logic
“logic alphabet”
loglan|lojban
“long now”
lovecraft|hpl|“cthulhu mythos”
“low tech”
“lucid dream”
ludism
ludology
madhyamika
“maker movement”|“make magazine”
manifesto
“many valued logic”|“multi valued logic”|“multivalued logic”
“many worlds”|“many worlds interpretation”
“martin gardner”
“math fiction”
meditation
memes|memetics
“memory palace”
“mental math”|“mental arithmetic”|“mental mathematics”
mentat
metagame|metagaming
micronation
“mind performance hacks”|mindhacker
mnemonic
“monty python”
moopsball
“morita therapy”
“morton’s list”
multiverse
+murse
mythtv|knoppmyth
naikan
nanofiction
necronomicon
“neo-american church”|“art kleps”
neurodiversity
nomic
nootropic
notation
notetaking|annotation
npr
nxt
“olaf stapledon”
olpc
“omega point”
“open source”
oulipo|“georges perec”
oz
panenpsychism
“paper craft”|papercraft
paradox
pataphysics
“pattern language”
pbs
“perennial philosophy”
“philosophy of science”|“philosophy of mathematics”
+piecepack
planiverse|flatland
“playing cards”
po
polyform|polyomino
“positive psychology”
“positive revolution”
posthumanism
“public radio”
“public television”
“quantum immortality”|“quantum suicide”
quenya|sindarin|elvish|tengwar
“rainbow deck”
“r a lafferty”
ramagon
“raymond smullyan”
rebt|“rational emotive behavior therapy”|“albert ellis”|“cognitive behavior therapy”|cbt
retrocomputing
“robert anton wilson”
robotics
“rudy rucker”
rwhe
savant
“science fiction”
seattle|tacoma
“self reference”
“sentience quotient”
seti
“sherlock holmes”
“sid sackson”
singularity
solipsism
solresol
speedwords
spime
“stanislaw lem”
“stephen colbert”|“colbert report”
stoicism
“strange loop”
superhero
synergetics|“buckminster fuller”
synesthesia
“systems theory”
“ted chiang”
teilhard
“they might be giants”|tmbg
tolkien
“toy system”
transhumanism
turing
uberstix
ubicomp
“ubiquitous computing”
vipassana
“wold newton”
writing
“zillions of games”
zome|zometool

masterserris  asked:

dude, i need you to read something. it's short and called 17776 and i got the link hmu and enjoy. it is amazing and you are gonna love it i sWEAR (space+formatting+c alebrihgiaebvdlasvnir)

AHHHHH YES IKR i started reading it like i think someone put it on my dash the morning it came out, i showed my mom and brother, the whole house is obsessed, it’s sooooo good

7

It’s been a while since I’ve read anything by Mark Z Danielewski. I haven’t kept up with his projects, even though The Familiar pops up in my Facebook ads all the time. But, I needed something new to read and it felt like time for some new Danielewski.

It looks gimmicky if you’re not familiar with his writing, but he does a great job of using ergodic styling. It doesn’t just add the narrative or themes - they’re intrinsically entwined. Neither works without the other.

I’m 50 pages in and enjoying it and I’m optimistic that I’m going to enjoy this. I also just learned this is just part one of a 27 (TWENTY-SEVEN) book series. I think only 4 volumes are out, but volume 1 released in 2015. How the fuck does someone write something so complicated so fast?

Stay tuned

Love and Tensor Algebra

Come, let us hasten to a higher plane
Where dyads tread the fairy fields of Venn,
Their indices bedecked from one to n
Commingled in an endless Markov chain!

Come, every frustrum longs to be a cone
And every vector dreams of matrices.
Hark to the gentle gradient of the breeze:
It whispers of a more ergodic zone.

In Riemann, Hilbert or in Banach space
Let superscripts and subscripts go their ways.
Our asymptotes no longer out of phase,
We shall encounter, counting, face to face.

I’ll grant thee random access to my heart,
Thou’lt tell me all the constants of thy love;
And so we two shall all love’s lemmas prove,
And in our bound partition never part.

For what did Cauchy know, or Christoffel,
Or Fourier, or any Bools or Euler,
Wielding their compasses, their pens and rulers,
Of thy supernal sinusoidal spell?

Cancel me not—for what then shall remain?
Abscissas some mantissas, modules, modes,
A root or two, a torus and a node:
The inverse of my verse, a null domain.

Ellipse of bliss, converge, o lips divine!
The product o four scalars is defines!
Cyberiad draws nigh, and the skew mind
Cuts capers like a happy haversine.

I see the eigenvalue in thine eye,
I hear the tender tensor in thy sigh.
Bernoulli would have been content to die,
Had he but known such a² cos 2φ !


Love and Tensor Algebra is a math poem from the book The Cyberiad written by Stanislaw Lem, a Polish writer of science fiction, philosophy and satire. The Cyberiad is considered one of his best work.

I remember something Hussie posted on…  I think it was his old Formspring? I’m not sure, maybe it was somewhere else. I’m paraphrasing, but it was something along the lines of:

“Homestuck is meant to be a story that’s also a puzzle. I don’t think all stories should be like that, but some stories should be.”

And that really hits home right now. Homestuck has always been what pretentious literary types would call ergodic literature. It’s not meant to be a straightforward story, it’s supposed to require effort in interpreting it, and leaves room for many different interpretations. That doesn’t make it better than other stories, but it doesn’t make it worse either. It’s a whole different medium that can’t really be viewed the same way you would a traditional narrative. It’s just really hard not to view it that way, as traditional narratives are really all we know.

But it started as a puzzle, and it ended as a puzzle, and if nothing else, I applaud Hussie for sticking to his vision of what the story should be, even if it wasn’t what many of us wanted it to be.

Homestuck did plenty of things wrong. I have a lot of criticisms for it, especially for Act 6. But it also did many things amazingly well, and it completely altered the way I think about storytelling (not to mention that it changed my life in many other ways).

As hard as it is to not be disappointed by this conclusion, it’s almost harder to be disappointed by it. Homestuck is still as great as it ever was, because it stayed true to the philosophy it was built on.

4

CSA: The Ergodicity Exhibition

Developed from their Evolo skyscraper competition entries, Ergodicity, an exhibition hosted by Canterbury School of Architecture, presented thesis work from eleven Graduate Diploma students.

With over 70 percent of the worlds growing population soon to live within major cities, the exhibition reconsiders the effect of increasing densities. Projects developed their research and design to accommodate for a variety of topics affecting our urban areas today, including: population increase, the rising demand for resources, pollution, waste management, and the digital revolution.

The projects which were shown covered a wide range of locations and programmatic responses, but as a collective all questioned ‘what role can the Skyscraper play in improving our urban areas?’

Responses included approaches such as Tiny Tokyo by Carma Masson, a mixed-use community micro scraper based in the business district of central Tokyo. Tiny Tokyo re-evaluates the approach towards designing skyscrapers, using them as a tool for reviving local heritage and culture, whilst introducing relevance for the people they are designed for, rather than designing them as a corporate tool. 

The future of our history is a concept which has been explored within Luke Hill’s project titled Dis.Assemble. This project involves a complex network composed of 6 miles of disused rail systems buried deep beneath London’s streets which provides a subterranean industrial waste facility: its sole intention to ‘Dis.Assemble’ materials produced by the metropolis above.

Unused space has also been explored within Jake Mullery’s SYMCITY thesis, describing an architectural construct that occupies the ‘dead’ space between existing skyscrapers. 

A comedic thesis by Paul Sohi told the story of one man’s life growing and living in a world of 10 billion people, where 90% of society lives in urbanised cities. The comic explores what such a world would be like.

The launch night was attended by many and with special guest Peter Wynne Rees, chief planner for the City of London, the exhibition was an opportunity to showcase the work of students at the Canterbury School of Architecture ahead of the end of year summer show which starts on the 31st of May.

-Text+photography by Taylor Grindley

St. Petersburg Paradox

Suppose you enter a casino offering a very simple game. The croupier tosses a coin, if it shows a tail, you win $1, if it’s heads, he flips again and the pot doubles. If the second flip is a tail, you win $2, if it’s heads, he flips again and the pot doubles. If the first tail arrives on the nth flip, you win $2^(n-1).

Here’s the question, how much should you pay to enter?

Naive probability suggests that the expected winnings is infinite, but that clearly doesn’t make much sense…

Many solutions have been proposed for this, in the 300 years since it’s proposal, some as recent as 2011 employing techniques from ergodic theory and statistical mechanics. Exactly when does taking an expected value make sense, and what else needs to be taken in to account?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/St._Petersburg_paradox

Though the term didn’t exist back when I was a teenager, squatting on comic-book floors to thumb through expensive hardback editions, RPGs are an example of the kind of literature described by Espen J Aarseth as ‘ergodic’. These are books, like digital literature, computer-generated poetry and MUDs, where a ‘nontrivial effort is required to allow the reader to traverse the text’. And they are more common than you might think, especially in geek culture. Game books that allow you to ‘choose your own adventure’ are ergodic, as are fantasy novels with extensive maps and world-building notes. But the RPG handbook pushes ergodic reading to its limit.
— 

Reading Roleplaying Game Books

From Damien Walter’s The joy of reading role-playing games at The Guardian. Yes, The Guardian.