eretmochelys

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Photo 1 / Photo 2 and Info

The Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) is a critically endangered sea turtle belonging to the family Cheloniidae. The hawksbill’s appearance is similar to that of other marine turtles. It is easily distinguished from other sea turtles by its sharp, curving beak with prominent tomium, and the saw-like appearance of its shell margins. Hawksbill shells slightly change colors, depending on water temperature. Young hawksbill turtles are unable to dive deep and spend their early years floating amongst sea plants near the water’s surface. The mechanisms that aid hawksbill turtles in returning to their nesting beaches are still unknown. It has been thought that these turtles are guided inland by magnetic fields and lunar phases/position. 

Hawksbill turtles are mainly associated with the clear, relatively shallow water of coastal reefs, bays, estuaries and lagoons, with nesting generally occurring on remote, isolated sandy beaches. They are usually seen resting in caves and ledges in and around these reefs throughout the day. As a highly migratory species, they inhabit a wide range of habitats, from the open ocean to lagoons and even mangrove swamps in estuaries. Hawksbills are omnivorous and will also eat mollusks, marine algae, crustaceans, sea urchins, fish, and jellyfish. They feed mainly on sponges by using their narrow pointed beaks to extract them from crevices on the reef, but also eat sea anemones and jellyfish. In the Caribbean, as hawksbills grow, they begin exclusively feeding on only a few types of sponges, and they can eat an average of 1200 lb. (544 kg) of sponges a year. Aside from sponges, hawksbills feed on algae, cnidarians, comb jellies and other jellyfish, and sea anemones. They also feed on the dangerous jellyfish-like hydrozoan, the Portuguese man o’ war.

Happy World Turtle Day! We’re shellebrating all day with tons of turtles. 

Historia testudinum iconibus illustrata by physician and naturalist Johann David Schopf (1752-1800) carefully described 33 kinds of turtles and tortoises. This plate of the Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricate) was done by famed illustrator Friedrich Wilhelm Wunder who worked directly from Schopf’s own drawings.

See this illustration in the exhibition Opulent Oceans, now on view. 

A Hawksbill Turtle, one of the featured illustrations in our new exhibition, Opulent Oceans

Historia testudinum iconibus illustrata by physician and naturalist Johann David Schopf (1752-1800) carefully described 33 kinds of turtles and tortoises. This plate of the Hawksbill sea turtle (Eretmochelys imbricate) was done by famed illustrator Friedrich Wilhelm Wunder who worked directly from Schopf’s own drawings. 

Learn more about Opulent Oceans: Extraordinary Rare Book Selections from the American Museum of Natural History.

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Turtle skulls! Again!

In the second image, the species are: (A) Lissemys punctata, (B) Chelonia mydas, C) Eretmochelys imbricata, (D) Dermochelys coriacea, (E) Macrochelys temminckii, (F) Kinosternon subrubrum, (G) Testudo graeca, (H) Cuora trifasciata, (I) Pseudemys concinna, (J) Terrapene ornata, (K) Emys orbicularis, L) Platysternon megacephalum, M) Macrochelodina (“Chelodina”) expansa, (N) Emydura maquarii, (O) Chelus fimbriatus, (P) Podocnemis expansa, (Q) Pelusios sinuatus.

Werneburg, I. (2012) Temporal Bone Arrangements in Turtles: An Overview. J. Exp. Zool. (Mol. Dev. Evol.) 318 235–249.

Just had this pop up on my news feed: Chinese poachers caught with 555 marine turtles, most dead

On Friday, eleven Chinese fishermen were caught by Filipino police with 555 marine turtles, 378 of which were dead. Officials in the Philippines have since released the 177 living turtles. But the incident has sparked an international standoff between the Philippines and China as the Chinese nationals were arrested in disputed waters in the South China Sea. 

The Philippines has charged nine of the 11 poachers over the incident—two were released because they were minors. Those charged could face 12-20 years in prison for poaching a Critically Endangered species, in this case the Hawksbill turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata). But China has demanded the release of the remaining fishermen and the boat, which was confiscated.

Read more at [mongabay]

Hawksbill Turtle - Eretmochelys imbricata by cookelma Hawksbill Turtle - Eretmochelys imbricata floats under water. Maldives - Ocean coral reef. Warning - authentic shooting underwater in challenging conditions. A little bit grain and maybe blurred.

#ReinoAnimal #Conciencia
La tortuga carey es un quelónido, única especie del género Eretmochelys. Actualmente se encuentra en peligro crítico de extinción, debido a la caza constante a la que es sometida. Su peculiar caparazón es codiciado entre las personas que se dedican a crear joyería y artículos de adorno.
Imagen :David Doubilet.

Hawksbill Turtle - Eretmochelys imbricata by cookelma Hawksbill Turtle - Eretmochelys imbricata floats under water. Maldives - Ocean coral reef. Warning - authentic shooting underwater in challenging conditions. A little bit grain and maybe blurred.

From National Wildlife Federation Photo of the Week; May 16, 2016:

Endangered Species Day

The 11th annual Endangered Species Day is May 20!

National Wildlife Federation spearheaded its establishment by Congress, and we like take this opportunity each year to celebrate and share the importance of wildlife conservation and restoration efforts for all imperiled species. It is also a perfect time to learn about and celebrate the progress made to protect wildlife since the creation of the Endangered Species Act in 1973.

At National Wildlife, we’re celebrating with some of our favorite images of imperiled species, submitted in our 2015 Photo Contest.

Photo Above: Photographer Chris Schenker photographed this Hawksbill Sea Turtle (Eretmochelys imbricata) “chomping down on a bit of soft coral” in Egypt’s Red Sea. The Massachusetts resident used a Nikon D7000 with a 10-17mm lens in Nauticam housing, with an underwater strobe light.

Dick Forehand was exploring Montana’s [Bridger Mountains](Bridger Mountains) when he came across a Northern Rocky Mountain Wolf (Canis lupus irremotus) with three pups. The Montana resident used a Canon 7D with a 100-400mm lens on a tripod to make this image.

Sandra Rothenberg made this compelling image of a Lesser Long-Nosed Bat (Leptonycteris yerbabuenae) at night in Tucson, Arizona’s desert. The Pennsylvania resident used a Canon EOS 1D Mark IV with a 70-200mm lens and a Phototrap infrared triggering system.

Janice Devos, on a recent trip to Alaska, was whale watching when she captured this moment of Humpback Whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) surfacing to feed. The Michigan resident used a Sony a100 with a 150-600mm lens.

Rachel Patterson was “working in sea turtle conservation when discovering a few Loggerhead Sea Turtle (Caretta caretta) hatchlings trapped along a rocky shoreline.” The Kentucky resident used an Olympus Stylus Tough TG-2 camera to photograph this rescued hatchling’s first swim.

Bob Miller took this photo from a boat while cruising Lake Tahoe in Florida. He writes, “the Snail Kites (Rostrhamus sociabilis) were flying low in the marsh as we moved slowly through the waters.” The Maryland resident used a Nikon D300 with a 200-400mm lens.

Didier Lindsey was in Valdez Arm, Alaska when he shot this photo of a “Bull Stellar Sea Lion (Eumetopias jubatus) grabbing and throwing a Pink Salmon (Oncorhynchus gorbuscha),” before consuming it. The Alaska resident used a Canon EOS 7D with a 500mm lens.

Steve Blandin photographed this Polar Bear (Ursus maritimus) “crossing the summer landscape with fireweed (Chamerion angustifolium) in bloom,” on the West Bank of the Hudson Bay in Canada. The Florida resident used a Canon EOS 5D Mark III with a 600mm lens.

Endangered Species Day is a celebration of our nation’s imperiled plants, wildlife and wild places, with an emphasis on success stories of species recovery.

National wildlife refuges, parks, botanical gardens, schools, libraries, museums, community groups and conservation organizations will hold various activities on Endangered Species Day and throughout the month. Events range from milkweed planting for monarch butterfly habitat and presentations at national parks to habitat restoration projects and special programs at more than 100 zoos and aquariums. For more information, visit www.endangeredspeciesday.org.  

Find out what endangered species live near you, learn their story and find out how you can help: http://www.fws.gov/endangered

Also check out this interactive map of species success stories: http://www.fws.gov/endangered/map/index.html

Let people know on Facebook. We’ve designed a few Facebook cover photos for you to use, or design your own! Post information and photos about endangered species and tag @National Wildlife Federation to share with our community

Finally, take a look at these 5 Ways to Celebrate Endangered Species Day.

More from National Wildlife magazine and NWF: