equality in islam

What It’s Like To Pray At A Queer-Inclusive Mosque

Buzzfeed has posted an illuminating article from contributor Davide Mastracci, about the Unity Mosque in downtown Toronto (the precise location of which is secret, to prevent harassment from non-sincere participants). It is a safe space for queer Muslims who may feel obligated to hide their identities when entering other mosques.

In their Friday services, “anyone can give the call to, or lead, prayer. There is no gender segregation….”

Says a bisexual Islam-convert Renée Mercuri, “It was very clear within minutes that everyone was welcome. Your Islam is your Islam. It doesn’t have to be prescribed. You follow this path in whatever way you feel comfortable.

Co-founded by a queer refugee lawyer (El-Farouk Khaki), the mission statement is: “While the Unity Mosque is an alternate space for Muslims, it is not meant to be a competing ideology. It is a place of refuge, not protest. For many, its existence is what has allowed them to keep faith.

Read the full article here.

anonymous asked:

This is just curiousty dont get offended.Being a women how can you believe in a religion which allows a 40 year old man to marry a 10 year old? Which does not give women equal rights in will? Which asks women to cover themselves so men dont get attracted? Which limits the rights of women to such a horrifying extent?

Women are not oppressed in Islam. Women have rights.

Women, through Islam, were given the right to owning property, conducting business, and fighting in war way before women in any other areas were.

Women have an extremely high status in Islam, we are treated like queens. 

We get taken care of, we don’t have to provide for our necessities. It is the OBLIGATION for the nearest male (husband, father, brother, uncle, etc.) to provide for us. We don’t have to do an inch of effort. BUT, if we want to work, if we want to provide for the household, we have total rights to just as the wife of the prophet ﷺ, Khadija ra radi Allahu ‘anha had her own business and provided for the family. 

When it comes to the age of Ayesha radi Allahu ‘anha when she got married to the prophet Muhammad ﷺ, most scholars believe she was actually around the age of 19. However, even if she was young, this was not an odd practice back then. In fact, the UK eliminated being married from the age of 11 just about a while ago, not too long from today. So if you want to go on that, UK is also a victim here.  

Women are given honorable rights, honestly, I believe Islam is far easier for women than it is for men. Men have to provide for the family, they have to pray in the mosque every Friday, they have to give a mahr (unless women excuse them from it) when getting married, and so on. All these, women do not have to do. Women even get a break from prayers and other religious obligations such as fasting every time they get their periods. How easy Allah is on us women Subhanallah. 

The prophet Muhammad ﷺ often encouraged for men to be of the best of character with their wives and not to mistreat them. A woman, in fact, came to the prophet Muhammad ﷺ complaining that her husband does not fulfill her sexual needs because he would spend the night praying, the prophet ﷺ reprimanded her husband and told him to leave the prayers at night and fulfill his wife’s needs. LOL, can you imagine?! 

Before Islam was revealed, daughters were buried and killed when born, Islam prohibited this and gave women rights they did not have before. We have the right to divorce and the right to educate ourselves to expand the list of rights.

So…how then do we not have rights or are oppressed? 

How are we limited? We are not? I live life just like any other woman, just more covered up is all. 

Also, what is wrong with covering up? Clothes were a form of advancement in the “Stone age.” We are at the peak of advancement. If you look through this analysis, it is those who roam around in shorter clothes that are moving far from advancement. 

Secondly, covering is less for men and more for our benefit. The point of covering is so that men do not objectify us, not for us to do any favor for men. Covering up forces men to marry due to deeper reasons than for the superficial surface. Covering protects a woman from lustful eyes and from being in danger. The notion of escaping beauty standards and from being objectified is far more appealing and liberating to me than to go around in shorts 🤷  (no hate, I’m not judging you all, just personal preference). We are dignified and respected, not objectified and disrespected.

So now you tell me, what’s wrong with the way Islam treats women with utmost respect, honor, and dignity?

Please do let me know your thoughts and have a nice day! 

I feel like I need to say something
  • cis people are not problematic
  • white people are not problematic
  • Christians are not problematic
  • Islam is not problematic
  • vegans are not problematic
  • guns are not problematic
  • feminists are not problematic
  • men are not problematic 
  • rich people are not problematic

Individuals are problematic, and sometimes an entire group of individuals can be problematic but please try not to judge someone based on their group, even if most of that group are idiots

The Anarchists vs. the Islamic State

Brace Belden before a battle in Syria in November. Courtesy of Brace Belden

By Seth Harp for The Rolling Stone. February 14, 2017 [x]

On the front lines of Syria with the young American radicals fighting ISIS

On the morning of his first battle, Brace Belden was underdressed for the cold and shaky from a bout of traveler’s diarrhea. His Kurdish militia unit was camped out on the front line with ISIS, 30 miles from Raqqa, in Syria. Fighters stood around campfires of gas-soaked trash, boiling water for tea, their only comfort besides tobacco. “I’ve never been so dirty in my life,” Belden recalls. When the time came to roll out, he loaded a clip into his Kalashnikov and climbed into a makeshift battlewagon, a patchwork of tank and truck parts armored with scrap metal and poured concrete. Belden took a selfie inside its rusty cabin and posted it online with the caption “Wow this freakin taxi stinks.”

The rest of the militia piled into an assortment of minivans, garbage trucks and bulldozers, and rode south into territory ISIS had held for more than three years. Belden was manning a swivel-mounted machine gun, the parched landscape barely visible through the rising dust, when he spotted a car packed with explosives revving across the desert toward the Kurdish column. Before he could shoot, an American fighter jet lacerated the sky and an explosion erupted where the car had been, shaking the earth for miles around.

It was November 6th, 2016. The Kurdish militia known as the YPG – a Kurmanji acronym for People’s Protection Units – had commenced a major offensive to liberate the city that serves as the global headquarters for ISIS. The YPG was backed by U.S. air power and fighting alongside a coalition of Arab and Assyrian militias. Also within their ranks, though scantly reported, was a group of about 75 hardcore leftists, anarchists and communists from Europe and America, Belden among them, fighting to defend a socialist enclave roughly the size of Massachusetts.

Belden, who is 27, started tweeting photos of the front shortly after arriving in Syria in October. The first widely shared image showed him crouched in his YPG uniform, wearing thick Buddy Holly glasses, a cigarette dangling from the corner of his mouth, a stray puppy in one hand and a sniper rifle in the other. “To misquote Celine,” the post read, “when you’re in, you’re in.” He has since amassed 19,000 followers under the handle PissPigGranddad, puzzling the Internet with a combination of leftist invective and scurrilous bro humor. Tweets like “Heading to the Quandil Mountains to lecture the PKK about entitlement reform” are followed by “The dude with the lamb bailed so now we’re fucked for dinner.”

Belden had no military experience before joining the YPG. He lived in San Francisco, where he arranged flowers for a living. Before that, he was a self-described lumpenproletariat, a lowlife punk and petty criminal with a heroin habit who started reading Marx and Lenin seriously in rehab. Once sober, he got involved in leftist causes, marching for tenants’ rights, blocking evictions, protesting police brutality. As he prepared for the Middle East, his girlfriend thought he was going to do humanitarian work. She was “not stoked,” Belden says, to learn that he planned to fight alongside the YPG.

The first phase of the Raqqa offensive was a mission to take Tal Saman, a satellite village of 10,000 people 17 miles north of Raqqa proper. “We pushed up to Tal Saman till we had it surrounded on a half circle,” Belden says, “then we just bombarded the shit out of it.” Refugees poured out of the village, seeking protection behind Kurdish lines. “Hundreds of civilians coming across for days in a row,” Belden says. At night, his unit stayed in whatever building they’d just taken, camped out on rooftops in the excruciating cold. “The first week we were out it was awful,” Belden says. The stepmother of a fellow volunteer from the U.S. had gotten Belden’s number. She kept texting to make sure they were eating enough.

The march on Raqqa slowed to a halt after two weeks, as the YPG consolidated its hold over a string of liberated villages. The YPG controls a region of 4 million people in northern Syria known as Rojava. Its tens of thousands of motivated fighters have been battling ISIS for five years. American as well as French warplanes have been covering their maneuvers with airstrikes for the past two, forcing ISIS off the roads and highways and open desert, and back into the urban strongholds of Mosul and Raqqa. Now, the Kurds are kicking the door down in both cities.

But the YPG is not your typical ethnic or sectarian faction. Its fighters are loyal to an imprisoned guerrilla leader who was once a communist but now espouses the same kind of secular, feminist, anarcho-libertarianism as Noam Chomsky or the activists of Occupy Wall Street. The Kurds are implementing these ideals in Rojava, and that has attracted a ragtag legion of leftist internationals, like Belden, who have come from nearly every continent to help the YPG beat ISIS and establish an anarchist collective amid the rubble of the war – a “stateless democracy” equally opposed to Islamic fundamentalism and capitalist modernity. They call it the Rojava Revolution, and they want you.

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