equality in islam

This woman is one of the organizers of the Women’s March. She’s talking about another women who survived Islamic oppression in Somalia.

Ayaan Hirsi Ali escaped an arranged marriage and is a victim of fgm. As a result she’s highly critical of Islam, and who could blame her? She even went on to become a member of Dutch Parliament. If you don’t know about her you should really read up because she’s a hero.

Why aren’t feminists calling out Linda Sarsour for what she said here? I’ve seen people ostracized and demonized for much much less. If this is the kind of person you’re willing to fall in line behind I don’t think you have any right to be complaining about the way women are treated in the western world.

I feel like I need to say something
  • cis people are not problematic
  • white people are not problematic
  • Christians are not problematic
  • Islam is not problematic
  • vegans are not problematic
  • guns are not problematic
  • feminists are not problematic
  • men are not problematic 
  • rich people are not problematic

Individuals are problematic, and sometimes an entire group of individuals can be problematic but please try not to judge someone based on their group, even if most of that group are idiots

anonymous asked:

This is just curiousty dont get offended.Being a women how can you believe in a religion which allows a 40 year old man to marry a 10 year old? Which does not give women equal rights in will? Which asks women to cover themselves so men dont get attracted? Which limits the rights of women to such a horrifying extent?

Women are not oppressed in Islam. Women have rights.

Women, through Islam, were given the right to owning property, conducting business, and fighting in war way before women in any other areas were.

Women have an extremely high status in Islam, we are treated like queens. 

We get taken care of, we don’t have to provide for our necessities. It is the OBLIGATION for the nearest male (husband, father, brother, uncle, etc.) to provide for us. We don’t have to do an inch of effort. BUT, if we want to work, if we want to provide for the household, we have total rights to just as the wife of the prophet ﷺ, Khadija ra radi Allahu ‘anha had her own business and provided for the family. 

When it comes to the age of Ayesha radi Allahu ‘anha when she got married to the prophet Muhammad ﷺ, most scholars believe she was actually around the age of 19. However, even if she was young, this was not an odd practice back then. In fact, the UK eliminated being married from the age of 11 just about a while ago, not too long from today. So if you want to go on that, UK is also a victim here.  

Women are given honorable rights, honestly, I believe Islam is far easier for women than it is for men. Men have to provide for the family, they have to pray in the mosque every Friday, they have to give a mahr (unless women excuse them from it) when getting married, and so on. All these, women do not have to do. Women even get a break from prayers and other religious obligations such as fasting every time they get their periods. How easy Allah is on us women Subhanallah. 

The prophet Muhammad ﷺ often encouraged for men to be of the best of character with their wives and not to mistreat them. A woman, in fact, came to the prophet Muhammad ﷺ complaining that her husband does not fulfill her sexual needs because he would spend the night praying, the prophet ﷺ reprimanded her husband and told him to leave the prayers at night and fulfill his wife’s needs. LOL, can you imagine?! 

Before Islam was revealed, daughters were buried and killed when born, Islam prohibited this and gave women rights they did not have before. We have the right to divorce and the right to educate ourselves to expand the list of rights.

So…how then do we not have rights or are oppressed? 

How are we limited? We are not? I live life just like any other woman, just more covered up is all. 

Also, what is wrong with covering up? Clothes were a form of advancement in the “Stone age.” We are at the peak of advancement. If you look through this analysis, it is those who roam around in shorter clothes that are moving far from advancement. 

Secondly, covering is less for men and more for our benefit. The point of covering is so that men do not objectify us, not for us to do any favor for men. Covering up forces men to marry due to deeper reasons than for the superficial surface. Covering protects a woman from lustful eyes and from being in danger. The notion of escaping beauty standards and from being objectified is far more appealing and liberating to me than to go around in shorts 🤷  (no hate, I’m not judging you all, just personal preference). We are dignified and respected, not objectified and disrespected.

So now you tell me, what’s wrong with the way Islam treats women with utmost respect, honor, and dignity?

Please do let me know your thoughts and have a nice day! 

5

Nike launches Pro Hijab to make sports more inclusive for women

This product is not created to glorify “oppression” and “misogyny”, but to pave way for women who respect their cultural/religious beliefs and still want to be a part of the sports world. Nike stands for equality and the idea that if you have a body, you are an athlete. Religion, sex and race should not keep you from doing so. Everyone deserves to be comfortable while still respecting their religious views. These athletes deserve to have gear that provides both of those.

What It’s Like To Pray At A Queer-Inclusive Mosque

Buzzfeed has posted an illuminating article from contributor Davide Mastracci, about the Unity Mosque in downtown Toronto (the precise location of which is secret, to prevent harassment from non-sincere participants). It is a safe space for queer Muslims who may feel obligated to hide their identities when entering other mosques.

In their Friday services, “anyone can give the call to, or lead, prayer. There is no gender segregation….”

Says a bisexual Islam-convert Renée Mercuri, “It was very clear within minutes that everyone was welcome. Your Islam is your Islam. It doesn’t have to be prescribed. You follow this path in whatever way you feel comfortable.

Co-founded by a queer refugee lawyer (El-Farouk Khaki), the mission statement is: “While the Unity Mosque is an alternate space for Muslims, it is not meant to be a competing ideology. It is a place of refuge, not protest. For many, its existence is what has allowed them to keep faith.

Read the full article here.

And now you’re facing a situation where the young Negro’s coming up. They don’t want to hear that “turn the-other-cheek” stuff, no. In Jacksonville, those were teenagers, they were throwing Molotov cocktails. Negroes have never done that before. But it shows you there’s a new deal coming in. There’s new thinking coming in. There’s new strategy coming in. It’ll be Molotov cocktails this month, hand grenades next month, and something else next month. It’ll be ballots, or it’ll be bullets. It’ll be liberty, or it will be death. The only difference about this kind of death—it’ll be reciprocal.

America will not be destroyed by undocumented immigrants, same-sex marriage, Muslims, atheists, or abortion, but rather by unreasonable fears, unbridled hatred, divisive politics, deliberate misinformation, and a gullible populace.
—  Laura C. Keeling

For One Saudi Woman, ‘Daring To Drive’ Was An Act Of Civil Disobedience

Manal al-Sharif’s path to activism began simply enough: In 2011, the Saudi woman filmed herself driving a car, then uploaded the video to YouTube. Ordinarily such a video might not get much notice, but because it’s not socially acceptable for women to drive in Saudi Arabia, where there is a de facto ban, Sharif’s video went viral.

Sharif describes driving as an act of civil disobedience: “For me, driving — or the right to drive — is not only about moving from A to B; it’s a way to emancipate women,” she says. “It gives them so much liberty. It makes them independent.”

Initially arrested for driving, Sharif was released when her story elicited outrage from around the world. She now lives in Sydney, Australia, with her second husband and son.

Though she is no longer in Saudi Arabia, Sharif remains outspoken about women’s rights: “When I see something wrong, I speak up,” she says of her advocacy of Saudi women. “It should be the norm, not the exception.” Her new memoir is Daring to Drive.