Women of the world are getting angry.

First we had the women of poland taking to the streets to stop their government from placing further restrictions on abortion.

Then Argentinian women marched and demonstrated against the brutal femicide in their country, with women all over Latin America, including Chilean president Bachelet, and even Spain expressing solidarity.

And we have women in Iceland staging a walkout from work 14% early to protest the wage gap, calling bullshit on their economists telling them to ‘just wait 50 more years for equal pay"

I am always proud to be a woman, but this past week I have been especially proud.

  • Me:*gets home after an 11 hour work day, makes dinner, browses Tumblr while eating*
  • Me:oh fun, people are making predictions about XF S11.
  • Me:*continues evening routine, gets on Tumblr an hour later*
  • Me:Wow, people are really into talking about S11. That's weird.
  • Me:*internal quadruple take* wait is there news?!?!?
  • Me:*Googles*

Women’s soccer players make WAY more money for the US soccer federation but earn 44% less– and now they’re suing for equality

In simple terms: The men earned four times as much to lose a tournament as the women earned to win the whole thing. Read the US women’s statement after the jump. And that’s not all: women’s physical playing conditions are different in one important way from the men’s.

Gifs: Today.com

Today, women make up half our workforce. But they still make 77 cents for every dollar a man earns. That is wrong. And in 2014, it’s an embarrassment. Women deserve equal pay for equal work.

She deserves to have a baby without sacrificing her job. A mother deserves a day off to care for a sick child or a sick parent without running into hardship. And you know what? A father does too. It is time to do away with workplace policies that belong in a Mad Men episode.


PRESIDENT OBAMA, during the State of the Union.


But the wage gap varies significantly by race, according to an analysis from the research organization AAUW. While white women experienced that 78 percent figure, Native Hawaiian and Pacific Islander women made 65 percent of what white men made in 2013, African-American women made 64 percent, American Indian and Alaska Native women made 59 percent, and Hispanic women made just 54 percent. Asian-American women are the only group doing better than white women, making 90 percent of white men’s earnings.

Woah, staggering.


“The pay gap does not affect all women the same way.”

Aug. 23 is Black Women’s Equal Pay Day, which marks the additional time it takes for black women to earn what white men earn in a year. To put it simply, it takes 20 months for a black woman to earn the same wages as a white man earns in 12.

According to the Center for American Progress, black women earn about 60% of what white men earn. The percentage is strikingly low in comparison to the 79% wage difference when grouping all women together. 

Fusion contextualized the wage disparities by doing the math for some of the richest and most famous black women, like Beyoncé and Halle Berry. 

follow @the-movemnt

Hey everyone! Betsey Stevenson here from President Obama’s Council of Economic Advisers. In honor of Women’s Equality Day, I’ll be taking over I Love Charts to tell the story of the progress we’ve made in closing the earnings gap between women and men, and the challenges women still face in the workforce. 

Let’s get started. Our first chart shows how women are increasingly contributing to family income and now make up about half the workforce. Since 2000, women’s labor force participation has dropped slightly, but most of that is because of cyclical factors and an aging population. While older women participate in the workforce at lower rates than younger women, the percent of older women who are working has increased since the mid-1990s, partially offsetting the overall decline.

At the other end of the spectrum, young women are more likely to be enrolled in school than they were a generation ago, and that’s good news. Since students (even ones who work part-time) are not considered to be in the labor force, increased school enrollment will depress the participation rate.

Wanna wonk out some more on this stuff? Check out our report on “Women’s Participation in Education and the Workforce.”


Today is Equal Pay Day: the day when women, on average, catch up to what men earned for the same work in the previous year. For women of color, the pay gap is even wider. 

Women are the primary breadwinners in more than 40% of households with children. And the gender gap affects trans* people, too. Eliminating the pay gap and ensuring all people make 100% of the wages they earn isn’t just a women’s issue — it’s critical for all of us.

It’s 2015. It’s time to close the gap.