what you need to do if i have a convulsive seizure

I was just complaining to my friend that my oldest sister didn’t know what to do the last time I had a convulsive seizure, and I ended up injured because of it. And my friend said that actually, they don’t know what to do when they see someone have a convulsive seizure, either.

So I thought I’d explain it to you.  I’m not a doctor, and I have no medical training and not everything here will apply to everyone who has convulsive seizures, these are just the things that apply to me, and when in doubt, call an ambulance. 

Here’s what you do:

Look around. Am I lying in the middle of a busy street or on the railroad tracks, or somewhere else dangerous, like in the bathtub? If yes, drag me to somewhere where I am not in imminent danger of being hit by a truck or drowning. 

Am I somewhere safe, but lying near dangerous things like fire or knives or broken glass or pans of boiling water or anything that can hurt me? Move the dangerous things away from me.

My body will be convulsing. That means my head and my arms and my legs are rapidly hitting the ground. Put something soft underneath my head. If there’s a cushion right there, perfect. If not, wad up your coat or shove your shopping bag under my head. If there’s nothing immediately to hand that would take you more than a few seconds to grab, stick your feet underneath my head, it’ll work.

Am I wearing anything around my neck, like a tight collar, or a necktie, or a choker? Loosen it, so my airway is clear.

Don’t restrict my movements - don’t try to hold my arms and legs down. You’ve already moved all the dangerous things away from me, and cushioned my head, so don’t hold me down, unless it is necessary to keep me from doing serious harm.

Don’t put anything in my mouth. A lot of people think you need to stick your fingers or a spoon or something into the person’s mouth to prevent them choking on their tongue.  Don’t do this. 

Try to make a note of the time the seizure first started. If the seizure lasts for longer than five minutes, call an ambulance.

When the convulsing/jerking has stopped, roll me onto my side. If you know what the recovery position is, put me in the recovery position, if you don’t, just roll me onto my side, and check my airway. If I’m not breathing, or I’m having trouble breathing, call an ambulance.

It seems to be instinctive to help someone get back to their feet as soon as the seizure is over. Don’t do this with me. After a seizure, I’m in something called a post-ictal state. It makes me very, very confused, and lying on the ground or sitting somewhere soft is the safest place for me. If you pull me to my feet while I’m still this confused, I will walk directly into traffic or put my hand on a hot stove because I won’t know where I am, or what’s happening, and often I won’t be able to see at all for a few minutes. Keep me somewhere safe until I’ve fully recovered.

If I have another seizure before I’ve fully recovered from the earlier one, call an ambulance.

If you think I might be hurt, or you’re confused or not sure about what to do, call an ambulance.

That’s all there is to it. Make sure I’m not in immediate physical danger; cushion my head (but don’t restrain it); when the jerking stops, roll me onto my side and check my airway; keep me somewhere safe until I’m fully recovered, and if the seizure lasts a long time, or I have a second one, or you aren’t sure what to do or you think I might be hurt, call an ambulance. That’s it. It’s not hard, and I promise you can do this.

PSA ABOUT SEIZURES. AKA HOW TO HELP A SEIZURE PATIENT WITHOUT BEING AN ASSHOLE.

I just had a seizure in french class, so this is the part where I go over seizure first aid just in case somebody you know goes through what I do. 

1. As soon as they start seizing get somebody to start a timer. If you don’t know the person call an ambulance. If you do know them, and know they have a seizure disorder call an ambulance anyways; unless they’ve previously told you otherwise. Don’t call the police. Police don’t know how to handle seizure patients. If you call the police that makes you an asshole. When the medics arrive tell them how long the patient has been seizing for, or how long they where seizing for if the seizure has stopped. 

3. if they are seizing violently do not hold them down, seriously you can give them serious bruises or even break their bones

2. If they’re not seizing violently, turn them on their side, and try to get them in the position closest to shock position that you can. They’ll thank you for this if they throw up and don’t choke on their own vomit. 

6. If possible put a pillow or soft object underneath the persons head. This will stop them from braining themselves on the floor, which is usually something we appreciate greatly. generally cracking our heads open is even less fun than seizing. 

Do not, and i mean it do not put anything in their mouth. They’re not going to swallow their tongue, that’s not an actual thing. They may bite it, but that’s preferable to choking on whatever shit you put in their mouth. Just don’t do it. 

4. If they wet themselves don’t tease them about it. don’t even mention it unless it’s to offer them a change of clothes. this isn’t a medical thing, this is just a “don’t be an asshole” thing. 

Don’t hold them down

5. don’t be an asshole in general. sometimes seizures and bodily fluids come hand in hand. we know this. trust me. 

Waking up from a seizure can be super scary, especially if the person has never had one before. Don’t let them sit up right away, and speak to them in as soothing of a voice as you can, and i mean like nature-documentary type soothing, that shit has got to be as calm as it possibly can be. 

Don’t fucking hold them down you can break their fucking bones i’m not kidding

I may add more to this later, but my brain is fried because, you know, i just had a seizure. 

Some Fight Left In Me

For liberaldisaster, who requested a fic about Enjolras and his service dog. Written on my phone since my computer is still dead, so please forgive any weird autocorrects I didn’t catch.

Developing E/R, modern AU. Warnings for brief mentions of violence/injury and injury recovery.

Both Enjolras and the labradoodle at his feet lifted their heads as Grantaire clattered into the room, but as soon as the dog saw who it was, he set his head back down on his paws. “Enjolras,” Grantaire panted, out of breath. “A bunch of us are getting coffee and I–” He broke off, wheezing. “Christ, I’m out of shape.”

Enjolras hid a smile. “You’re getting coffee and wanted to invite me?” he guessed. “You know, you own this thing called a cellphone that allows you to text or call me instead running all the way over here.”

Grantaire shrugged, still breathing heavily. “Yeah, but where’s the fun in that?” he asked. “Besides, I’m better at guilting you in person than over the phone.”

“Fair enough,” Enjolras said after he rolled his eyes goodnaturedly. “So where are you planning on going, anyway?”

Keep reading

I know that it may not be important but i thought i would share. While I’m in the hospital my mom is usually gone because shes stressed and doesn’t want me to see so basically I’m alone. I cant get out of bed without a nurse to help me because I’m a fall risk…but i don’t feel alone here. I have so many good people keeping me company over the *scandalous* internet, ( @// im-angel-of-the-lord @ //elizadora @// thedarklord-rory @// lili-isyourqueen @// theskeletonmeme-lord and others on different apps )

While im waiting to have seizures and or just… figure out what is wrong im talking to them and watching my favorite youtubers. markiplier and jack mostly . It makes me feel like im home.. and i just wanted everyone to know how much they mean to me, near or far ill always be thankful of your existance.

4

These are amazing, for those who are non verbal or have problems communicating. Or any other indications of a special consideration paramedics may need in the case of an incident.

Saw them on my Facebook so I’ll copy and paste the info here:

https://m.facebook.com/doedoesbibs/

“A friend has asked for one of these to be made and embroidered. What a great idea!! For adults and children! Not only for autism but for any condition or illness. Could be a lifesaver in an emergency. If paramedics saw this no matter what the condition they know straight away what to do and what to avoid. Allergies etc 💓💙 home made belt covers with embriodery £8 £1 to post smaller items xx”

Do you really need a service dog?

This is a post predominantly for the people with invisible illnesses, but I suppose can extend to anyone with unsupportive people in their lives. You encounter a great deal of opposition to your service dog when people can’t see disability from both strangers and people close to you.

Making the decision to get a service dog takes so much time and consideration. We all know the questions we ask ourselves:

  • Can I handle the attention is public?
  • Is it worth packing him up and taking him everywhere?
  • Am I willing to make the sacrifices it takes to have a service dog and adopt a new normal?
  • Will it be a net positive for me
  • What will my friends and family say?

…….

That last question is a kicker.

When I chose to apply for Earl, my genteel Southern family exploded. The best way I can recount their reactions to hearing the news is through another of my beloved bulleted lists:

  • “Okay…. Well…… What do you want me to say?”
  • “So you’re just giving up on getting better?”
  • “Don’t you want to be normal?”
  • “You’re being selfish. There are people in worse shape than you who need service dogs.”
  • “You’re just exaggerating your seizures so you can take a dog everywhere.”
  • “Just keep trying to get better and get a normal dog.”
  • “Are you still talking about getting a service dog? I thought we talked you out of that months ago.”

The list goes on. They even called the agency after I put in the application with two references and a doctor’s note confirming my disability to tell them I didn’t need a service dog. Just a side note- I’m 24. They’ve grown to love Earl, but still pet him when he’s vested and make comments like, “Oh, you brought your dog again.”

Even my supportive friends didn’t act the same for a while. Until they adjusted, it was a little lonely. Conversation was strained and brief. I became reclusive. Then I got creative. I started using social media and texting for interaction for a while with the people I was closest to. Then would meet them for a meal or coffee because Earl sleeps quietly under the table at restaurants. People forget he’s there. It felt like old times and it helped them realized I am the same person I was before Earl came along. 

*That was long. Sorry about that. Here’s the advice part (another bulleted list): 

  • Your service dog is for YOU. Be okay with and unapologetic about that.
  • Try to help the people you love understand and be prepared for them not to.
  • When trying to reconnect with people who may feel uneasy about your new “buddy,” Try to hang out with them and at all costs try to avoid talking about your illness for a while. They care, but it’s a good reminder that you’re the same person you were before. They probably miss you as much as you miss them.
  • Try to be comfortable in your own skin. Remind yourself that you’re not defined by your illness. You just need a little extra help. You’ll exude that confidence and people will be more at ease around you and your service dog.

now THIS was super fun to make. Each sequence in the final version has 15 frames. Originally the 2 Puppetry segements were like 68 frames each so I had to carefully analyze which 15 frames together had the most movement (for dramaticness

There was also some math to figure out how many frames I could fit. I did try to put 2 punch sequences one between both puppet segments but unfortunately it was too big, In order to make it work each part would have to be 11 frames which is cutting it a little too short. 

All in all these are a blast so I’m pretty much going to do whatever scene I can find that works for it. You can see my other combined gif here

anonymous asked:

Hi there! I'm writing a story fanfic about a main character with epilepsy. Her meds don't control it very well, and she has absence and tonic-conic seizures. One night she goes into status epilepticus and 911 is called. Could you give me some insight as to what the paramedics would do when they arrive on scene? And if they couldn't get her to stop seizing at the ER what could the ICU stay be like? And how long roughly would it be? I'm love to get a better idea of this in addition to my research.

Hey there nonny! Yes! Status epilepticus is a really scary thing to watch, and I’ve come across it several times.

First, upon arrival, paramedics are going to try to determine:

  • How long she’s been seizing
  • Does she usually seize once or multiple times, when she seizes?
  • Has she ever been in the ICU for her seizures?

All this is going to be while they’re making sure she’s lying on her side, that she has a pillow under her head, and while one of them is drawing up a medication (either Ativan / lorazepam, 2mg, or Versed / midazolam, 10mg) to give intramuscularly into a thigh.

They’ll also apply an oxygen mask and may check a blood sugar level, especially if she’s diabetic.

If the first line of medication doesn’t work, it’s time to scoop and run, because many EMS systems don’t have good backup plans for “what if first-line benzodiazepines fail?”.

If they have it on hand, an excellent second-line medication is ketamine, given at high doses (4mg/kg IM, so a 70kg person might get 300mg intramuscularly). That should stop the seizing.

Once we get beyond that point it’s down to general anesthesia and intubation, which, hopefully the ketamine is enough to get that done.

Somewhere along the line, probably en route to the hospital, they’ll try to get an IV, but I have to say, getting an IV on a seizing patient in a moving vehicle isn’t easy. I’ve done it, but I’ve never LIKED doing it. (The medic will likely stabilize the arm against the medic’s leg to keep it “still” while performing the IV).

Other systems might try more benzos – additional Ativan or Versed or Valium / diazepam – but this probably won’t work, because the longer someone seizes, the more GABA receptors shut down – the same receptors hit by benzodiazepines. (This is why I suggested ketamine above!)

This is a patient the ER will get a heads-up about. If EMS hasn’t intubated her, the ER is going to. They’ll put her on a drip of either midazolam or (preferably) propofol and fentanyl until her brainwaves have been completely flatlined, as evidenced by EEG monitoring. She’ll also be loaded with an antiepileptic like Keppra or Dilantin IV.

This character is getting an emergent CT of the head, to make sure that the issue isn’t because of a bleed or a tumor or some other intracranial catastrophe.

If it truly is her epilepsy, she’ll be admitted to the neuro ICU, which may be at another hospital, so they may need someone like me to come and do the transfer.

At the Neuro ICU…. well, honestly, she’ll likely get another CT, and probably an MRI if they suspect a physical cause.

As for the experience of being in a Neuro ICU, you’re in luck. I have not one, but TWO excellent masterposts – interviews, really – about this very topic. M was kind and brave enough to come on the blog and talk with me about her husband’s 3-month coma that was due to intractable seizures.

Her posts are here (part 1): http://scriptmedic.tumblr.com/post/155822695067/nothing-like-a-lightswitch-ms-husbands-3-month

and here (part 2): http://scriptmedic.tumblr.com/post/156139302257/nothing-like-a-lightswitch-ms-husbands-3-month

Part 2 even contains her direct advice for writers, which I appreciate immensely.

I hope this helped your story!

xoxo, Aunt Scripty

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