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Genetic Scientists under attack for speaking out. New Documentary.

like i never ever do this but god check out the nerve of this asshole

i censored the doxxing information which was way fuckin overboard 

i didn’t send this ask because i’m not that vicious (and never  capitalize shit lmao) but jesus “so i’d wager they didn’t miss the pissbaby who complains about his epilepsy” 

i’m not writing this out of malice for the user or “callout culture” but because this is a direct insult to people who grew up with epilepsy and i’m personally pissed off by it

a-red--day asked:

hey. so i was officially diagnosed with ADHD inattentive when i was 15, re-diagnosed when i was 17. was pretty sure i had it my whole life, since i always exhibited all the symptoms. now i'm 19. a week and a half ago i had my first grand mal seizure. i've had seizure ACTIVITY before this, however (twitching mouth/lips). my mom thinks ive been having absence seizures my whole life. so is it common for seizure activity to be confused for ADD symptoms? what is your knowledge on this topic?

I know two things about this.

First, I know that absence seizures can look like zoning out, so it’s possible that they could be misinterpreted as a symptom of inattentive ADHD.

Second, I know that uncontrolled seizures can cause cognitive decline.

It’s probably possible for seizures to cause ADHD symptoms, but I’m sure it’s also possible to have both ADHD and a seizure disorder.

-J

One more thing–having one seizure doesn‘t necessarily mean you have epilepsy. I know at least two people who randomly had one or two grand mal seizures in adulthood and never had one again. The seizures were tied to stress and sleep deprivation. Talk to a neurologist about this.

–Elise

Yesterday was No Shame Day for disabilities. I was away from technology, so I didn’t post my selfie then. Here’s a picture of me from when I was in the epilepsy monitoring unit a few months ago.
I have severe, life-threatening allergies, epilepsy, and cortical visual impairment. They aren’t always obvious, but they’re still a part of me. There is no shame in invisible disabilities.

Epilepsy-Proof your April Fools

Hello! It is I, your friendly neighbourhood epileptic, here with some tips for a photosensitive-safe April 1st

Absolutely do not post:

  • Screamers
  • Anything designed specifically to give people seizures

Absolutely tag every time:

  • Rapidly flashing colours
  • Rapidly flashing lights
  • Rapid, loud, repetitive sounds, especially in combination with the above
  • Optical illusions

Understanding How Neurons Shape Memories of Smells
Discovery has implications for understanding epilepsy

In a study that helps to deconstruct how olfaction is encoded in the brain, neuroscientists at University of California, San Diego School of Medicine have identified a type of neuron that appears to help tune, amplify and dampen neuronal responses to chemosensory inputs from the nasal cavity.

The study, published March 9 in Nature Neuroscience, has applications to understanding the root cause of epileptic seizures, which are frequently centered in the olfactory cortex, the part of the brain that processes the sense of smell.

“Our sense of smell is complex and involves many overlapping and interconnected neuronal circuits,” said lead author James Sturgill, PhD, a postdoctoral researcher with the Center for Neural Circuits and Behavior in the Department of Neuroscience. “More than hearing or sight, olfaction is based upon past experiences and associations.”

“Our research addresses the question of how the brain combines activity from these other circuits with chemosensory inputs to encode an olfactory memory,” he said. “Our results suggest that certain neurons in the olfactory cortex serve as tuners and volume controls for various neuronal inputs.”

The cells that appear to perform this task are among the 10 percent of neurons in the brain that secrete inhibitory neurotransmitters, chemicals released in the synapse that raise the threshold for neuronal firing. The function of these inhibitory neurons is increasingly recognized as critical to the sensory perceptions of sound and sight. The study is among the first to demonstrate that inhibitory neurons also play a critical role in processing smells.

For the study, neuroscientists employed a technology called optogenetics to de-activate inhibitory neurons in the olfactory cortex of mice. The mice were then presented with different odors and intensities of odors, including lemon, pine and banana, while electrical activity in the olfactory cortex was recorded.

In the absence of the inhibitory neurons, researchers observed an increase in brain activity unrelated to direct processing of the odors. The amount of this background brain activity was unrelated to odor intensity.

When these same neurons were allowed to function normally, the background “noisy” brain activity decreased without distorting the fidelity of the neuronal representation of the odor itself.

Described in signal processing terms, the inhibitory neurons appear to increase the signal-to-noise ratio of brain activity. They may also improve the ability to discern different odors.

“If you wonder how it is possible to smell a banana peel in a garbage can, it is because of this type of subtle neuronal control, achieved through inhibition,” said senior author Jeffry Isaacson, PhD, professor of neuroscience.

Neuronal inhibition by these same cells may also assist in preventing excessive excitation in the olfactory cortex that is associated with epilepsy. “The olfactory cortex is the region of the brain most likely to experience epileptic seizures,” Isaacson said. “It’s likely that the cells involved in processing odors also prevent seizures. Epilepsy can be recast as an abnormality in the function of these inhibitory neurons.”

The Signs as Lonely Island songs
  • aries:3-Way (The Golden Rule)
  • taurus:I'm On A Boat
  • gemini:Jack Sparrow
  • cancer:Great Day
  • leo:Like A Boss
  • virgo:YOLO
  • libra:Hugs
  • scorpio:Creep
  • sagittarius:When Will The Bass Drop?
  • capricorn:Cool Guys Don't Look At Explosions
  • aquarius:Boombox
  • pisces:Jizz in My Pants

A lot of people who know me online and offline know that I am a fighter. They know that I am brave. If there’s an emergency, I’m one of those people who keeps their heads and keeps you safe.

What you might not know is that for as much fight and bravery I have, there is one area that I feel utterly defeated and that’s my brain damage. One of the first things school taught me was that unless it was a situation that could create a liability for them, they didn’t care. They cared that I could have seizures, but they didn’t care if I couldn’t read or hear sometimes. I’ve been shamed and ridiculed by many teachers on many grade levels for asking for something important to be printed on white paper or for them to repeat something. When I was little, the problem was worse and I didn’t realize that what I was epxeriencing was a breaking down of visual and auditory processing, but by the time I realized the words I needed to convey why their “best reader” couldn’t read something or why the kid with the “best hearing” didn’t understand what they just said, I had graduated from university.

This t logo with the flashing colors that could become hypnotic enough to provoke a seizure in me is part of a long list of grievances nobody cares to help me with. Before this, the not found pages got stroboscopic and I installed X-Kit to fix it. Before that, deviantART showed me that even after ten years of being on their website, they still don’t care enough to make some kind of alternative skin so I (and many others) can navigate and read their site more easily. I’ve been called a liar by a lot of school officials for telling them I couldn’t read (or sometimes couldn’t see) the print on some colored piece of paper or heard mumbling instead of instruction. When I say “I don’t count” and “I don’t matter,” it’s not my depression talking, it’s just a fact. My needs don’t matter and they’ve never counted. I had to stop watching The Flash (CW), Hannibal (NBC), and maybe Doctor Who because nobody cares about people with photosensitivity. Yeah Hannibal warned for one episode, but then they brought the strobe light back without a warning in another episode and used these situations that would cause occipital lobe damage to justify murder by one character and attempted murder by another.

I just am so exhausted by this. Before school, I felt like an alien. As i began to feel human, teachers and students treated me like an object that you had to abuse to gain favor with popular kids, and from that point onward, I feel like an object. This my needs don’t matter only intensifies this feeling that I’m not human and I’m unworthy of being treated as such.

I don’t even want special treatment. I just want a more upfront system about stroboscopic and other photosentivie disorder-triggering effects like we have for sexual, violent, and adult content. I don’t need a movie like The Amazing Spider-Man 2 (2014) or a TV show like The Flash to never exist, but for them to be honest that they’re a movie and a TV show I can never watch. I don’t need the t logo to change for everyone or for deviantART to give up on its preferred color scheme, I just want an opt out of the flashing t logo and a skin from deviantART that accomodates peope who cannot read the default skin effectively. I don’t need other students to have their syllabi printed on white paper instead of purple paper, I just need my copy to be on white paper, and offline, I will always pay extra for my special needs (mostly because I honestly barely have enough money to pay for my needs offline let alone online and offline). I want to feel like I have a place in this world. I want to feel like I’m not this fungus that somehow learned to talk. But, I know that’s wishful thinking. I know how tired I am about trying to assert myself as a person worthy of what I need to ease burdens I’ve had since I was born.