epicenity

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@wmag

The Movie Issue is here, starring 39 of the year’s #BestPerformances

Benedict Cumberbatch in The Imitation Game
“Both my parents are actors, and they discouraged me from the profession. But I thought their lives were so romantic. 
I did loads of plays when I was at school. It was all boys, so 
I got to play girls. It’s scary how epicene I was. I got the female thing down. My parents were a little worried at that point—they thought they’d lost me to the other side 
of the board.”

Canali sweater; Thomas Pink shirt; Umit Benan pants; Tabio socks; Mr. Lacy shoelaces; Converse sneakers.

Photography by

Tim Walker
Photo in higher res Cover (hi res)
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And then there were a pair, boy and girl. I saw them together a great deal, and at first I thought they were boyfriend and girlfriend, until one day I saw them up close and realized they had to be siblings. Later I learned they were twins. They looked very much alike, with heavy dark-blond hair and epicene faces as clear, as cheerful and grave, as a couple of Flemish angels.

And perhaps most unusual in the context of Hampden – where pseudo-intellects and teenage decadents abounded, and where black clothing was de rigueur – they liked to wear pale clothes, particularly white. In this swarm of cigarettes and dark sophistication they appeared here and there like figures from an allegory, or long-dead celebrants from some forgotten garden party.

(happy birthday, nana!)

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charles and camilla macaulay 

“And then there were a pair, boy and girl. I saw them together a great deal, and at first I thought they were boyfriend and girlfriend, until one day I saw them up close and realized they had to be siblings. Later I learned they were twins. They looked very much alike, with heavy dark-blond hair and epicene faces as clear, as cheerful and grave, as a couple of Flemish angels. And perhaps most unusual in the context of Hampden–where pseudo-intellects and teenage decadents abounded, and where black clothing was de regueur– they liked to wear pale clothes, particularly white. In this swarm of cigarettes and dark sophistication they appeared here and there like figures from an allegory, or long-dead celebrants from some forgotten garden party.”

- donna tartt, the secret history

[listen] [download]

But it’s Eddie Redmayne hoovering up the limelight, playing the scheming space-lord Balem, an epicene pharaoh of intergalactic evilness – languid, lip-pursing and sporting the kind of makeup that must take him hours each morning to apply. With the merest eyebrow-elevation, or discontented moue, or sly disclosure of ripped abs, Redmayne rules this film.
—  Peter Bradshaw demonstrating that The Guardian/Observer critics have the best summaries of Eddie Redmayne’s performance
But it’s Eddie Redmayne hoovering up the limelight, playing the scheming space-lord Balem, an epicene pharaoh of intergalactic evilness – languid, lip-pursing and sporting the kind of makeup that must take him hours each morning to apply. With the merest eyebrow-elevation, or discontented moue, or sly disclosure of ripped abs, Redmayne rules this film.
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londonphile:

@wmag

The Movie Issue is here, starring 39 of the year’s #BestPerformances

Benedict Cumberbatch in The Imitation Game
“Both my parents are actors, and they discouraged me from the profession. But I thought their lives were so romantic. 
I did loads of plays when I was at school. It was all boys, so 
I got to play girls. It’s scary how epicene I was. I got the female thing down. My parents were a little worried at that point—they thought they’d lost me to the other side 
of the board.”

Canali sweater; Thomas Pink shirt; Umit Benan pants; Tabio socks; Mr. Lacy shoelaces; Converse sneakers.

Photography by

Tim Walker
Photo in higher res Cover

(

hi res

)

x x 
…Carl Barat was part of his dream. “Everything I could ever fantasise about a boy and his guitar and a girl … and was possible, and was becoming reality.”
— 

Peter in an interview to Guardian, 2005

He is high and sometimes miserable in this interview, yet he says incredibly beautiful and wise things. These words about Carl are quite mysterious: a boy with a guitar and a girl, all in one? All sorts of inspiration combined in one human being - friendship, music, romance - here comes an epicene linchpin of Peter’s dreamworld. 

In writing about The Portrait of a Lady, James Wood speaks in the same sentence of ‘the dashing, reliable Lord Warburton’ and ‘the dashing, demonic Gilbert Osmond’ (LRB, 11 October). Male critics just don’t seem to get what attracts female characters to male ones. First of all, Warburton is not dashing. It is hard to be dashing and reliable at the same time. He is a decent, fine man. But he is basically uninspiring, as Isabel Archer realises. Gilbert Osmond is far too epicene to be called dashing. An obvious example of a dashing character is Vronsky in Anna Karenina, published at around the same time as James’s novel. Scoundrels, such as Anatole Kuragin and Dolokhov in War and Peace, can also be classed as dashing (Natasha Rostov falls for Kuragin hard), and characters that begin as callow youths can grow into dashing romantic heroes, as Nikolai Rostov does when he rescues Princess Maria from her rebellious serfs. Steerforth in David Copperfield is dashing enough to ruin Little Emily. Many women (at least those who had poorly functioning phoniness detectors) found the real-life Bryon dashing. The fliers in the First World War and in the Battle of Britain were dashing. Jane Austen’s works are full of dashing characters. John Buchan’s Richard Hannay is dashing. Warburton and Osmond don’t make the cut. None of the men in The Portrait of a Lady is dashing. That is part of Isabel’s tragedy. They are all either kind-hearted mediocrities, effeminate sadists or, in the case of Caspar Goodwood, dangerously attractive but too modern and business-oriented to be classed as dashing. Maybe James Wood should run his essays by a committee of teenage girls before he publishes them.
— 

Hope Leman
Corvallis, Oregon 

Letters · LRB 20 December 2012