ep: provenance

Provenance

Summary: In order to get the information you need for case, you start to date the owner of an auction house’s daughter. Dean isn’t keen on the idea of you dating anyone else.
Words: 8.5k (plus 2.8k smutty coda- smut can be avoided or read alone)
Dean x Reader, Sam x Jess, brief Sarah x Reader
Warnings: pseudo-infidelity, bi!reader Coda warnings: smutty smutty goodness

Beta: @blacksiren 
A/N: this is part of my ‘Jess never died’ rewrite, find the masterpost here

Your name: submit What is this?

You were lying on your stomach in a motel just outside of New York, skimming through local papers and looking for a case.

Dean was out hustling pool, your sister shopping for non-perishable essentials, leaving you and Sam behind to do the job hunting.

Keep reading

5 Books on Art Provenance
A Shelfie from Kelly Davis, Research Assistant at the Getty Research Institute

Hi, I’m Kelly Davis, research assistant in the Getty Provenance Index at the Getty Research Institute. My background is in English, but I graduated with a master’s of library science and a master’s in art history from Pratt Institute in 2014. Books have been an important part of my life since I can remember. These are 5 that inspire and aid me in my work.

1. The Rape of Europa: The Fate of Europe’s Treasures in the Third Reich and the Second World War by Lynn H. Nicholas (Vintage Books, 1994).

One of the first books to focus on Nazi-era provenance and also one of the most famous. The publication of this book in the early ‘90s launched an international interest in the repatriation of art looted from Jewish art dealers and families during World War II and encouraged organizations to create guidelines such as the Washington Conference Principles on Nazi-era Confiscated Art (1998) and the AAM Guidelines Concerning the Unlawful Appropriation of Objects During the Nazi Era (2001). It inspired me to focus on provenance in my art historical studies and might have been the first step to where I am today.

2. Rogues’ Gallery: The Secret Story of the Lust, Lies, Greed and Betrayals that Made the Metropolitan Museum of Art by Michael Gross (Broadway Books, 2009).

While at the Last Bookstore in DTLA a few years back, a good friend of mine pulled this book out and handed it to me, exclaiming that she loved it and I had to read it. Somehow I hadn’t heard of it, but it piqued my interest as I enjoy nothing more than a gossipy read about the inner workings of established museums. While this isn’t about provenance specifically, and is more “pop” than some of the other academic texts on this list, it’s a fun and fascinating story and will certainly intrigue any lover of museums.

3. Memories of Duveen Brothers by Edward Fowles (Times Books, 1976).

This, along with a small stack of other books written by J.H. Duveen, or about the House of Duveen by those with intimate knowledge of it, have been gracing my desk for months. Like Knoedler & Co., Duveen was instrumental in the migration of European art to America in the early 20th century, and also like Knoedler, the Getty Research Institute owns the Duveen archive. Here in the Provenance Index, we’re interested in seeing what more we can do with stock book records we have on site, so I’m boning up on my knowledge of this great firm. These books are older primary sources, meaning what is said in them could be quite subjective. Of course, this is also what makes them so delightful.

4. Provenance: An Alternate History of Art edited by Gail Feigenbaum and Inge Reist (Getty Publications, 2012).

This book was a gift from Dr. Frima Hofrichter, one of my mentors in graduate school. Frima knew I had been accepted to the internship program here at the Getty, and what gift better than one on provenance published by the GRI and edited by Gail Feigenbaum, one of our esteemed associate directors? If Nicholas’s book was my introduction to “pop” provenance, this was my introduction to the academic career path ahead of me. A collection of essays on topics from collector’s marks to provenance in the Third Reich, reading this acquainted me with a number of respected scholars in the field, and names I would encounter during my time at the Getty.

5. The AAM Guide to Provenance Research by Nancy Yeide, Konstantin Akinsha and Amy Walsh (American Alliance of Museums, 2001).

The quintessential reference for provenance research, not so much a book you read but one you keep coming back to. Although the guide is being refined as we move forward in the 21st century (see the ArtTracks project at the Carnegie Museum of Art for more info), this book is still the standard for curators, librarians, collectors, and anyone else involved in provenance and the history of collecting. It’s been invaluable for the past few years as I’ve worked on the Knoedler & Co. stock books database. The appendices are particularly useful to a researcher, with information on dealer archives and locations, as well as a list of “red-flag” names to watch out for when dealing with World War II provenance.

Okay. So, I don’t think there are any spoilers in this:

…a giant black spider scuttled out of the airlock, nearly a meter high, a rolled-up blanket clutched in one hairy appendage. Weirdly, disturbingly graceful, it skittered up to Captain Uisine and stopped, turned one of its far too many stalked eyes toward Ingray. No, it wasn’t a spider. It was…something else.

“Um,” said Ingray. “That’s…is that a spider?” She didn’t know why the back of her neck was prickling. She didn’t mind spiders. But this was so large and so unsettling. Its legs were jointed wrong, she realized, and its eyestalks sprouted right out of its blob of a body. There was no waist, no head. And something else was wrong, though she couldn’t quite say why.

“Of course it’s not a spider,” replied Captain Uisine, still frowning at the suspension pod. “You don’t get spiders with half-meter bodies, or two meter leg spans. Or, you know, not unaugmented ones. But this isn’t a spider.” He looked up. “But it’s kind of like a spider, I’ll grant you that. Do you have a problem with spiders, excellency?” The not-spider’s body trembled gelatinously, stretched to become oblong rather than round, and four extra legs slid out, to touch the bay floor. “Does that help?”

Seeing the thing change shape was somehow even more disturbing, but she refused to step back, even though she wanted to. “Not really. And I don’t mind spiders at all. It’s just, this looks so…so organic.” Except in a wrong, squishy, itchy sort of way.

“Well, yes,” said Captain Uisine, standing square and stolid by the open crate. Entirely unbothered by the spidery thing beside him. “A lot of it is. Some people find it unsettling, and apparently you’re one of them, but it’s just a bio-mech…”

I think that’s really all I can give anyone until later! Even this much is making me want to just maybe give you more…but I really can’t.

Provenance

noun

  1. the place of origin or earliest known history of something. “an orange rug of Iranian provenance” synonyms: origin, source, place of origin; More
  • the beginning of something’s existence; something’s origin. “they try to understand the whole universe, its provenance and fate”
  • a record of ownership of a work of art or an antique, used as a guide to authenticity or quality. plural noun: provenances “the manuscript has a distinguished provenance”

A quick sketch before bed! Everyone’s been drawing the spider mech from Provenance and we seem to have settled on this cute “dust bunny” design, but apparently these little guys are apparently moderately upsetting so here’s a friendly, useful mech with radially mounted legs and fine manipulators that look like realistic human hands and a lamprey maw for what’s probably a very practical reason.