eowyn quotes

My top three feminist exploitations of male-default language:

1. “Valar morghulis. All men must die.” “Yes, but we are not men.” - Daenerys, Game of Thrones

2. “No man can kill me!” “I am no man!!!!” - Eowyn, LotR: Return of the King

3. “God creates dinosaurs. God destroys dinosaurs. God creates man. Man destroys God. Man creates dinosaurs.” “Dinosaurs eat man. Woman inherits the earth.” - Dr. Ellie Sattler, Jurassic Park

2

“Liv Tyler, when I first arrived on set I thought, “That’s Liv Tyler, she’s pretty famous.” I’m the sort of person that doesn’t move forward to people and be like, “Hey, I’m your new best friend!” I’m not like that, give them their space, they’re famous, they must be sick of people who want to get close to them all the time. But she came straight over to me, which is sort of quite un-actress type behavior and she gave me a huge hug and said, “I’m so glad you’re here! There’s another woman here now! It’s all been men! We can do things together! We can paint nails!”

Miranda Otto on meeting Liv Tyler for the first time

6

“She’s had a lot of passion and words and talk and high ideals. Now she’ll get to see what she’s really made of. She’s believed she’s capable of certain things and should be valued equally as a man and should be allowed to go war. She also has to face unrequited love and the realization that part of her destiny isn’t what she thought. But there are better things ahead for her.”

Miranda Otto on Eowyn

What is it that causes us to fall in love? We are met with those first, initial glimpses– a kind of curiosity, a longing for that which is both familiar and unknown in the other. And then comes the surprise of discovery; we share certain aspirations, certain appreciations, and that which is different excites us. Before each other, we are moved to bravery and we come to reveal more and more of ourselves, and when we do, those very traits that caused us some embarrassment or shame become beautiful in ways we did not understand before, and the entire world becomes more beautiful for it. There are, too, those intimate and nearly primitive stirrings, the scent of the neck, the delicious tremble of skin and breath. Yet for all their pleasures, they are as tenuous as light and air, and demand no fidelity.

And then there is this: Does not love depend on some belief in the future, some expectation beyond the delight of the moment? We fall in love because we imagine a certain life together. We will marry. We will laugh and dance together. We will have children.

When expectation falls to ruins, what is there left for love?

—  Eowyn Ivey, To The Bright Edge of the World