environmental shift

The INTJ (NiTeFiSe)

Introverted Intuition (Ni):

  • Futuristic minded, often comfortable forming personal expectations of how situations will turn out
  • Prone to inaction until they have “foreseen” the outcome or negative consequences
  • Comfortable reading between the lines or “intuititing” the motives of others
  • Endlessly ponders perspectives and ideas until shaping them into a specific singular conclusion or viewpoint
  • Open to altering these perspectives or visions, but requires extensive time to do so (unable to improvise in the moment or respond quickly to environmental shifts)
  • Predominantly characterized by well-developed imaginative abilities and mental wanderings
  • Often spends a great deal of time simply thinking
  • Prone to reflection on scenarios, on pondering information, and forming individualized abstract concepts or revisiting concepts of interest
  • May be prone to excessive daydreaming, creating intricate inner worlds or universes, or mentally replaying elements of their own personal experience
  • Not always inclined to share their imaginative tendencies or thoughts with others
  • Develops complex mental inner landscapes, shaped and continually revised by new information
  • May find acquiring new knowledge to “complete” the details of their instinctual knowledge tiresome, and prefer to work off intuitive insight rather than detail-driven awareness
  • Sometimes slow or reluctant to adopt or update new information (if not eager to shift their worldview)
  • Confident about analyzing the implications of gathered information
  • May view others’ ideas with skepticism or scrutiny
  • Can perceive others’ intellectual contributions as limited in scope
  • Occasionally prone to fatalistic thinking or general self-doubt
  • May pay little attention to maintaining their sensory surroundings
  • Might prefer observance in order to gain understanding of a situation rather than active participation

Extroverted Thinking (Te):

  • Places great importance on factual accuracy and understanding how things work
  • Able to articulate factual reasons for many of their opinions and decisions
  • Can offer information to others that is accurate and contains “proof” (through medical studies, obvious logic, examples, etc)
  • Excels in accumulating factual and objective information in areas of personal interest
  • Good at rational problem-solving and striving to make their goals a reality
  • Tends to want something to show for their time and mental energy
  • Enjoys focusing on and seeing a task through to completion
  • Good at articulating their insights into frank advice for others
  • Is aware of the financial implications of their decisions, and inclined to factor that into the choices they make, personal and otherwise
  • Often respects others with a good work ethic, and strive for one themselves
  • May challenge the information being exchanged by others if it is inaccurate
  • Able to channel their energy toward creative criticism and improvement
  • Tends to evaluate others on terms of reliability and productivity in the workplace

Introverted Feeling (Fi):

  • Values others who keeps their commitments and doesn’t misplace the INTJ’s trust
  • Tends to deeply internalize their feelings, resisting outward displays of feeling
  • Prioritizes that which is most important to them in life
  • Has a strong sense of individuality
  • Dislikes anyone who ‘forces’ others into specific behaviors or removes choices from their life
  • Has a set of values by which they operate, distinct from social expectations
  • Often feels things more intensely than they let on
  • Sometimes prone to devaluing the human element in problem-solving, leading others to mistake their logic-driven solution with “coldness”
  • Forms a deep kinship to a few people who have earned their respect
  • Places a great deal of importance on ethical principles
  • Develops a strong sense of goodwill and loyalty toward others that have proven themselves trustworthy
  • Can be calm, attentive, and sympathetic listeners
  • When unhealthy or in a bad place emotionally, may be inclined to aggressively attack others’ intelligence, ideas, or character
  • Tends to make relationship decisions and stand by them
  • May appear overly polite, formal, or distant in social situations
  • Often reluctant to enlist the assistance of other people, desiring self-reliance instead

Extroverted Sensing (Se):

  • Prone to inaction in making their dreams a reality, or the temptation to “think” instead of “do”
  • Often finds interaction with the outside sensory world empty and unfulfilling
  • May fall into reproducing past experiences instead of finding new interests  
  • Often deals with sensory reality in clumsy or inexperienced ways
  • Under stress, may be prone to excessive sensory behaviors (too much drinking, casual flings, and reckless, hedonistic, or irresponsible actions)

Drawn from MBTI / Socionics descriptions. Compiled by Charity.

Giant iceberg’s split exposes hidden ecosystem

Biologists are racing to secure a visit to a newly revealed region of the Southern Ocean as soon as it is safe to sail there. One of the largest icebergs ever recorded broke free from the Larsen C ice shelf on the Antarctic Peninsula in July. As it moves away into the Weddell Sea, it will expose 5,800 square kilometres of sea floor that have been shielded by ice for up to 120,000 years. If researchers can get to the area quickly enough, they’ll have the chance to study the ecosystem beneath before the loss of the ice causes it to change.

“I cannot imagine a more dramatic shift in environmental conditions in any ecosystem on Earth,” says Julian Gutt, a marine ecologist at the Alfred Wegener Institute for Polar and Marine Research in Bremerhaven, Germany.

The calved iceberg is about the size of Delaware. Copernicus Sentinel-1 via BAS

WORLD BUILDING JUNE EPISODE 12 AND 13: FAUNA & FLORA

They’re kind of linked concepts, so I’ll be talking about fauna and flora in one megapost instead of 2 separate days.

As I’ve mentioned before, the sun is dimmer on Perigean Tide’s earth than on real life earth, and the flora and fauna have adapted accordingly.

Leafy, photosynthesizing plants are still a thing, but they’re a much smaller portion of plants than on irl earth because there’s less sun and so photosynthesis isn’t as viable. The photosynthesizing plants they have are low-light, akin to spider plants or ferns. Instead, carnivorous plants and fungi have taken over some of the ecological niches that purely photosynthesizing plants and grasses have. Fungi are especially plentiful in “forest” areas with more humidity and rainfall and can grow to massive sizes.

In some seaside areas, corals and anemone type creatures have evolved to live on land as well (as you can see a little bit in the coastal biome pic from earlier). It might not make perfect evolutionary sense especially for the corals, but dang if it doesn’t create a distinct otherworldly aesthetic…

The fauna varies from recognizable to “familiar, but different” to “idk what that is.” Many creatures make use of echolocation, bioluminescence, low-light vision or other adaptations that make living on a planet with a crummy sun viable.

The least changed animals are domestic dogs and cats, as their domesticated nature and prevalence has left them comparatively unchanged from the environmental shift the apocalypse brought. As a side note, breed diversity in dogs is much less exaggerated than say, present day dog breeding. There’s no AKC enforcing aesthetic standards and dogs are typically bred for and judged on their function rather than coat pattern or ear shape. The idea of a “purebred” dog is pretty weird—the closest thing to a widespread purebred dog breed is the glass-eyed starehound, which can essentially sniff out psionic energy and lunar radiation. This is because the mutation is valuable and very recessive so the easiest way to get more is inbreeding. I have a lot more on dogs, but this isn’t about only dogs… I will say that there’s another important “breed” called the fighthound, but it’s more of a blanket term for any big beefy dog with a mysotatin mutation.

Other animals are much less familiar. We have the “familiar unfamiliar” in the form of things like rats, birds, and wolves, and then we have dragons, cockatrices, and other oddities… btw, if you mentioned the idea of a dog/wolf hybrid to someone from the PT world they would be baffled.

(Dragons and cockatrices are livestock. More on that when we get to episode 14.)

Then, we have “monsters.” Monster is not a scientific category, but is instead used to refer to notably aggressive or disturbing fauna, creatures that are difficult to classify or defies existing scientific knowledge or logic, lycomorphs, and spectres, which I haven’t talked about yet but will when I go into more detail about how psionic powers work.

Introverted Functions

Would it be correct to think of the introverted functions as the parts of our lives where we want things done ‘in our own terms’? Sort of where everyone forms their own personal code? Thank you! :-)

Yeah, that’s actually a reasonable way to look at it.

It’s also helpful to remember that introverted functions are the hardest to externalize or express without needing time to organize in your mind, in order to express yourself in a manner without using abstractions to do so.

So, Ti’s need time alone to figure out how things fit together into their system.

Fi’s need time alone to sort through and process their internal emotions.

Si’s need time alone to process and ‘store’ sensory experiences.

Ni’s need time alone to build intuitive conclusions and extrapolate material.

The introverted functions are ‘slower’ than the extroverted functions, which can react in ‘real’ time…

Te: instant external fact or organization.

Fe: instant external emotional responses as things happen.

Se: instant reaction to environmental shifts and focus on the present.

Ne: instant response to and ‘using’ of new external ideas and possibilities.

- ENFP Mod

anonymous asked:

Did you ever notice any differences in how Brooklin dances when she went from club to Alexa and then back to club? She seems to have always been on point which is really impressive considering those were some pretty major environmental shifts

I liked the quality of movement Alexa pulled out of her. I like Alexa’s old style more than club’s new style so I’m probably biased though. I think her technique improved when she went back to club, though the way she uses her hyper extension sometimes scares me. 

One of my favorite types of Harry Potter aus will always be the “What if [your favorite character] got Sorted into a different House?”

Because while I don’t necessarily believe that a different House would really change who a character is as a person, it would still be a distinct environmental shift that would probably bring out entirely different qualities.

So here’s one I had lately – and pack your bags, because when I go on rambling insane thought vacations they’re never brief ones – sharing on the off-chance that hey it might amuse a handful of people. Because why not.

What if Lucius Malfoy ended up in a different House at Hogwarts?

Keep reading

A tale of four world cities – London, Delhi, Tokyo and Bogotá compared

Cities are not static. Like living organisms they change and adapt over time. Some grow and others shrink in response to economic, political and environmental shifts. But they do this in radically different ways, reflecting local responses to regional, national and global changes. Recently, LSE Cities focused on the patterns of growth, governance, transport and density of the four national capitals of Japan, India, Colombia and the UK. Together, the metropolitan areas of Tokyo, Delhi, Bogotá and London have over 80 million residents (equal to the population of Germany) and, according to the Brookings Institution, a combined GDP of $2.2 trillion, the size of the Brazilian economy or three times that of Saudi Arabia.

Source: The Guardian

Voice and Shadow (1/3)

What if the Hostess did not sacrifice herself, and the Entity survived? A Doctor Who: Midnight AU.

(Inspired by this conversation with the delightful badwolfrun, who lights up my dash with Midnight excellence!)

Rated teen (for now).

Part One | Part Two | Part Three


- Repetition -


It takes roughly five hours, twenty minutes, and forty-eight seconds for the Entity to destroy the population of the Leisure Palace.

Oh, it doesn’t get everyone. The director of facilities enables an emergency protocol and a fair number of guests are able to escape via shuttles, screaming and pushing their way past the hundreds of people already taken by the Entity. But more importantly—yes, the Doctor will acknowledge how selfish he is in prioritizing her safety above the others, and no, he doesn’t care—Donna is safe. Donna and the several dozen people she manages to coax into the TARDIS seventeen minutes and forty-six seconds into the slaughter. Donna and the people who tried to kill the Doctor. He knows Donna is not happy that they number among the survivors. She hates them. He can see it in her face when she ushers them in through the open doors, one hand extended to the Doctor in wait. Tears stream from her eyes as she alternately pleads with and shouts insults at him.

Oi what are you doing just standing there get in here get in here now Doctor please why won’t you move just move move move

The Doctor repeats her words exactly as she says them. He can’t stop himself. His voice is a slave to someone or something else. His words are no longer his.

He wants to tell her to go without him. It’s too late for him anyway. He can’t save her or the rest of them; can’t even save himself. But he just stands there, rooted to the spot, his body unable to obey the electrical signals shooting from his brain, his mouth unable to give voice to his words. Something stops him. Hijacks the signals. Shorts the fuse. Breaks the circuit. His neural transmitters flicker like the broken lights blinking above, alternately casting the landing bay in light and dark. Synapses fire uselessly, and his treacherous body is silent. All he can do is watch her, and tremble, and hope.

Keep reading

3

Ellie is never in any real danger when sneaking past enemies in The Last of Us. The player character of Joel is charged with her protection- but her invulnerability makes this a moot point outside of some environmental puzzles. This shifts the understanding of what Ellie is to the player. Rather than a protector and the protected the relationship between the player and her is one of partners. They both need each other, but this doesn’t manifest itself in negatives (using first aid packs when Ellie’s hurt, extracting her from crowds of zombies, etc.) but in positives (assistance in combat, identifying unseen enemies from a distance, etc.). 

anonymous asked:

How do you think dinosaurs fit in the bible?

The topic of dinosaurs in the Bible is part of a larger ongoing debate within the Christian community over the age of the earth, the proper interpretation of Genesis, and how to interpret the physical evidences we find all around us. Those who believe in an older age for the earth tend to agree that the Bible does not mention dinosaurs, because, according to their paradigm, dinosaurs died out millions of years before the first man ever walked the earth. The men who wrote the Bible could not have seen living dinosaurs.

Those who believe in a younger age for the earth tend to agree that the Bible does mention dinosaurs, though it never actually uses the word “dinosaur.” Instead, it uses the Hebrew word tanniyn, which is translated a few different ways in our English Bibles. Sometimes it’s “sea monster,” and sometimes it’s “serpent.” It is most commonly translated “dragon.” The tanniyn appear to have been some sort of giant reptile. These creatures are mentioned nearly thirty times in the Old Testament and were found both on land and in the water.

In addition to mentioning these giant reptiles, the Bible describes a couple of creatures in such a way that some scholars believe the writers may have been describing dinosaurs. The behemoth is said to be the mightiest of all God’s creatures, a giant whose tail is likened to a cedar tree (Job 40:15). Some scholars have tried to identify the behemoth as either an elephant or a hippopotamus. Others point out that elephants and hippopotamuses have very thin tails, nothing comparable to a cedar tree. Dinosaurs like the brachiosaurus and the diplodocus, on the other hand, had huge tails which could easily be compared to a cedar tree.

Nearly every ancient civilization has some sort of art depicting giant reptilian creatures. Petroglyphs, artifacts, and even little clay figurines found in North America resemble modern depictions of dinosaurs. Rock carvings in South America depict men riding diplodocus-like creatures and, amazingly, bear the familiar images of triceratops-like, pterodactyl-like, and tyrannosaurus rex-like creatures. Roman mosaics, Mayan pottery, and Babylonian city walls all testify to man’s trans-cultural, geographically unbounded fascination with these creatures. Sober accounts like those of Marco Polo’s Il Milione mingle with fantastic tales of treasure-hoarding beasts. In addition to the substantial amount of anthropic and historical evidences for the coexistence of dinosaurs and man, there are physical evidences, like the fossilized footprints of humans and dinosaurs found together at places in North America and West-Central Asia.

So, are there dinosaurs in the Bible? The matter is far from settled. It depends on how you interpret the available evidences and how you view the world around you. If the Bible is interpreted literally, a young earth interpretation will result, and the idea that dinosaurs and man coexisted can be accepted. If dinosaurs and human beings coexisted, what happened to the dinosaurs? While the Bible does not discuss the issue, dinosaurs likely died out sometime after the flood due to a combination of dramatic environmental shifts and the fact that they were relentlessly hunted to extinction by man.

anonymous asked:

Question for a friend - if God created people during the seven days, then how were dinosaurs around for a long time before people came?

The topic of dinosaurs in the Bible is part of a larger ongoing debate within the Christian community over the age of the earth, the proper interpretation of Genesis, and how to interpret the physical evidences we find all around us. Those who believe in an older age for the earth tend to agree that the Bible does not mention dinosaurs, because, according to their paradigm, dinosaurs died out millions of years before the first man ever walked the earth. The men who wrote the Bible could not have seen living dinosaurs.

Those who believe in a younger age for the earth tend to agree that the Bible does mention dinosaurs, though it never actually uses the word “dinosaur.” Instead, it uses the Hebrew word tanniyn, which is translated a few different ways in our English Bibles. Sometimes it’s “sea monster,” and sometimes it’s “serpent.” It is most commonly translated “dragon.” The tanniyn appear to have been some sort of giant reptile. These creatures are mentioned nearly thirty times in the Old Testament and were found both on land and in the water.

In addition to mentioning these giant reptiles, the Bible describes a couple of creatures in such a way that some scholars believe the writers may have been describing dinosaurs. The behemoth is said to be the mightiest of all God’s creatures, a giant whose tail is likened to a cedar tree (Job 40:15). Some scholars have tried to identify the behemoth as either an elephant or a hippopotamus. Others point out that elephants and hippopotamuses have very thin tails, nothing comparable to a cedar tree. Dinosaurs like the brachiosaurus and the diplodocus, on the other hand, had huge tails which could easily be compared to a cedar tree.

Nearly every ancient civilization has some sort of art depicting giant reptilian creatures. Petroglyphs, artifacts, and even little clay figurines found in North America resemble modern depictions of dinosaurs. Rock carvings in South America depict men riding diplodocus-like creatures and, amazingly, bear the familiar images of triceratops-like, pterodactyl-like, and tyrannosaurus rex-like creatures. Roman mosaics, Mayan pottery, and Babylonian city walls all testify to man’s trans-cultural, geographically unbounded fascination with these creatures. Sober accounts like those of Marco Polo’s Il Milione mingle with fantastic tales of treasure-hoarding beasts. In addition to the substantial amount of anthropic and historical evidences for the coexistence of dinosaurs and man, there are physical evidences, like the fossilized footprints of humans and dinosaurs found together at places in North America and West-Central Asia.

So, are there dinosaurs in the Bible? The matter is far from settled. It depends on how you interpret the available evidences and how you view the world around you. If the Bible is interpreted literally, a young earth interpretation will result, and the idea that dinosaurs and man coexisted can be accepted. If dinosaurs and human beings coexisted, what happened to the dinosaurs? While the Bible does not discuss the issue, dinosaurs likely died out sometime after the flood due to a combination of dramatic environmental shifts and the fact that they were relentlessly hunted to extinction by man.
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