entrance portfolio

felixirs  asked:

If you don't mind me asking, were you as good at art as you are now when you decided to go to uni for it? I'm worried maybe I'm not good enough to draw professionally but it's the only thing I wanna do so I want to go for it anyway and hopefully four years will help me a lot

Definitely not. It took me two tries just to get in to school, and I could barely handle life drawing. I think I have my old entrance portfolio somewhere, if I can dig it up I’ll post it here.

Four years is actually a lot of time to grow, especially when you’re young. As long as you keep working, I think most people’s answer to your question would be that they did improve (it’s pretty hard to stay stagnant, or go backwards if you’re making an effort).

Drawing, painting, school, work- it is what we make it, and there will always be people better than us. Once I came to terms with that and stopped comparing myself to everyone else around me, it didn’t matter anymore and I could focus completely on improving myself.

No matter what you decide to do, do it with conviction :)

anonymous asked:

Hey there~ your drawings are so amazing!!! I've been keeping up with your Vlog and recently saw your Calarts sketchbook haha. Sorry if this is weird or anything, but will you post some photos of your Sheridan entrance portfolio too?

Thank you! Haha glad you like my vlogs/sketchbook. I was reluctant to post my portfolio because I rushed it AND I took pictures of it literally as I was at the post office sending it off, but since people wanna see it I’ll show you what I have. Also I did this in one week don’t be me. 


anonymous asked:

what kind of things/assets do gobelins usually look for in a portfolio?

-perspective drawing
-life drawing
-skills in composition (layout, graphism)
-observation drawing

here is my entrance exam portfolio, maybe it can help you (keep in mind this is not the best portfolio, other studens usually have better ones. btw you can google ‘gobelins portfolio’ to get other examples) :
http://dessinepouroublier.blogspot.fr/2008/05/jai-eu-les-gobz-woah.html

anonymous asked:

What do you do as a visual development artist? And how did you know you wanted to be that?

Hi Anon, 

Depending on how far along the project is I usually work with the director or production designer of a film to design anything they might need to help tell their story. Sometimes that’s as simple as designing a simple prop for one scene or an entire world and moment paintings to sell the movie before it’s greenlit. 

I was in college studying to be an engineer and decided it wasn’t for me. I took a figure drawing class and my instructor showed me the skillful hunstman book made by art center students. I decided there, I wanted to do concept art/visual development and worked for a year drawing and painting to build an entrance portfolio to get into art center. After I graduated I started my career as a vis dev artist. 

anonymous asked:

Can you show us samples from your undergraduate portfolio?

Heh, I’m pretty embarassed by it but sure. This is what I could find on the Internet right now but that’s obviously problematic and unfair because it only shows the stuff I thought was good at the time and not metric-ton of failure projects I had along the way.

—Freshman Year (2007–2008)—

Disclaimer: This stuff was at the end of the year after I had gotten the hang of school. The stuff I did in the beginning was really really terrible. My GPA in my first semester was a 2.87. I got a D- in Typography 1 for example, and I was almost on academic probation. That was a wake-up call and it was depressing to me to find myself struggling. There’s an instagram video of my entrance portfolio to get into school (#tbt ya’ll) and by the time these projects were finished it was like night and day.

Catalogue for the motion design program at Art Center College of Design (which I was a part of for most of school actually.) Susan Lee-Clark was my professor.

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Album cover I did for a band that some of my best friends in high school was a part of that formed when they went to college.

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Stills from my first 3D animation (Cinema4D) class where I made a fake educational PSA for kids about how viruses infect bacteria narrated in Japanese. My initial concentration at school was on motion design and animation. I eventually realized I wasn’t passionate about it but I still learned a lot. Rob Garrott was my professor.

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—Sophomore Year (2008–2009)—

Exhibition Design for this made-up show. I did this with my friend Tsz Ho Ip. Carolina Trigo was my professor.

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Some stuff that I designed and animated (I was trying to get an internship at a motion design studio named Buck which I eventually got.)

1. Brian Green TED Talk [LINK] . Chris Dooley was my teacher.

2. Motion Design Reel [LINK] . 

I really got along with an art director that worked at Buck while I was interning there who goes by “The Beast is Back.” I made a postcard for him.

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Still from an animation I did dedicated to Lisa ‘Left-Eye’ Lopes from TLC where I had the lyrics to ‘No Scrubs’ read through an automated VoiceText reader and then combined data-moshing and lasers. Ew. Yuck. I don’t know what the fuck I was thinking, I think i was reading too much Hipster-Runoff and looking at Tumblr at the time. Jesus Christ fuck everything about this. I’m terribly sorry. Chris Dooley was my teacher.

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Poster for film screenings at Art Center.

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A zine I did that features a transcription of an interview I did with a childhood friend who, at the time, was an undocumented immigrant, where we talked about the hardships he faced in basic things like obtaining a driver’s license or getting a college education. Joshua Trees was my professor. It’s funny, I left Art Center to study at Central Saint Martins before ultimately coming back and he was my teacher at both schools out of sheer coincidence.

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— Junior Year (2009–2010) —

Silkscreen poster for a friend’s Nico Sala and Jasper Kingeter’s “comedic French-British rap group”. I studied printmaking under Anthony Zepeda. But I was pretty sloppy so my homie Devin Troy Strother, who now enjoys life as a successful artist pretty much did all the work for me on this one. I did his website though so it’s all good.

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200+ page book investigating a murder in a lagoon that shocked Los Angeles and lead to race riots in the 1940’s. Hardcover bound with a deboss in the interior. Brad Bartlett was my professor.

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Around this time, to make money I started freelancing as a storyboard artist for motion design studios.

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Identity design for the London Festival of Silent films. I gave every film a separate symbol that combined to form the main identity. For the posters, I chose not to reference silent films because it seemed to obvious so I built on the idea of silence. The idea was to show these huge nature scenes found on the British Isles in tube stations and around the city which at the time I thought would be interesting to juxtapose with the urban surroundings of London. Clive Piercy was my professor.

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This 17-foot poster I did for an exhibition on Archigram. Was inspired by their imagination when it came to the scale of their works. I built this typeface and set ‘Archigram’ in it, then I spent a few weeks cutting out windows, facades, pipes, etc, and combined them with my lettering. So I made a big poster lol. It folds down into an A1 sized book. My friend Daniel Seung Lee who is now enjoying his life as a successful photographer helped me take a photo of this. Another project under Clive Piercy.

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Silkscreened poster. It was supposed to be about the Hindu Milk Miracle that took place in India in 1995 but in all honesty that was bullshit posturing and I just wanted a project that’d get me on Manystuff which never happened because I wasn’t critical enough. What I did end up getting on was TrendList and then I sent them a crybaby e-mail telling them to take me off. Ooo boy.

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— Senior Year (2010–2011) —

Stuff for the Chinese American Museum. I’m getting tired of writing descriptions blah blah blah.

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225 page book with exposed spine for the binding. Look at me I’m just throwing all the tricks in my grab bag of tricks. This book also used augmented reality as if the binding wasn’t enough already. [LINK].

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Branding for an upscale knife shop. Basically I was no better than that stupid menswear store that sells the expensive axe.

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Okay so I was still technically in the motion design concentration at school and so I needed credit to graduate. This was the last animation I participated in. Here’s a styleframe from a group project.

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So yeah, just a sample of stuff I did while I was a student at Art Center College of Design. Stylistically and contextually it was kind of all over the place. But, I was 18 when I started so I was still trying to figure out what my interests and passions and my work so I was just as confused and clueless. It was a crazy experience but overall it was definitely life-changing and what helped me grow the most were the friends I made along the way. They influenced me more than anything. Nico Sala, Josh Finklea, Scott Langer, Roy Tatum, Justin Sloane, Frank Lionetti, Dawn Kim, Devin Troy Strother, David Jien, Tsz Ho Ip, Grace Pincer, Victoria Tutunjian, I love/miss you guys and I’m grateful and glad I got to know all of you. And to my teachers, Clive Piercy, Brad Bartlett, Simon Johnston, Anthony Zepeda, Elena Page, Rob Garrott, thank you for your wisdom.

anonymous asked:

Hello! I've been on your blog for hours and everything on it is so helpful! I am still a high school student and I need to submit a portfolio that "illustrates my creativity". Do you think I would still need a certain format, theme, and table of contents? By the way I have seen the examples that you posted but aren't those too professional for an acceptance to an undergrad program? If yes, do you have any examples for something that applies to my situation?

ENTRANCE PORTFOLIO | What do I really need?

First off, Thank you!! I’m glad to help!

Now, if you are coming out of high school, the main struggle is usually not having enough work to put into a portfolio unless you come from a school with a strong design program.

I think I know what you mean by my examples looking “too professional”, but it is important to make it look as professional as possible. When you apply to a degree program for architecture they are looking for your “sense” of design. The content matters, but not as much as the layout and how the work is presented. They know that incoming students will not be as refined as the students already in the program, you simply don’t have the experience, and that is ok. But showing that you have an idea of what design “means” is something that could make or break a spot in the program of your choice.

Basically don’t submit an unorganized, sloppy mess. lol

Some people get in with just photography and painting portfolio spreads, without any models or architectural drawings, while others get in based off of their work they did in design classes. If I were you, I would try to make a portfolio with all of your best work (even if that is like 2 things), then look and see what else you might want to add to it.

Then look at the time you have until the portfolio submission deadline and work your ass off to get some good quality projects done before then to beef up your portfolio.

I know this will still be frustrating not having any concrete guidance, so here is what I’m gonna do; I will make another post right after this one with an “Intro Portfolio Example” to see if that will help!

Until then, to give you an idea of what I mean by having a “sense of design”, Here is my CORE DESIGN PORTFOLIO

Hope this helps!! Keep working at it, it doesn’t get any easier, you just get better!

Cheers,

Mark Perrett, tipsforarchitectureschool

abejot  asked:

what is so awful about the administration?

i, and a lot of other students, disagree with how the illustration major is run. illustration students make up a third of the entire student body, which is ludicrous. they intentionally let in people who aren’t good so that they can make more money. i’ve spoken with teachers who are in charge of reviewing entrance portfolios and they are shocked at the skill level of some people they have to allow in. classes are woefully overcrowded as a result and a lot of people (ME) can’t get into required classes. the advice from administration is “try again next term”. illustration is used as a cash cow for the rest of the school. we don’t even have our own work spaces. they built some “homeroom” thing, but it’s 15 minutes away on another campus and you have to pay to use it, and afaik there’s no place to actually work, just couches and stuff. no one i know has actually been there.

when we bring up these concerns, we’re told to “not be critical” and “not raise a fuss”. but at $18,000 a term we are not getting adequate resources compared to the other majors. transportation design gets their own room, couches, and cintiq monitors. entertainment design gets their own room that you need a card to enter, cintiq monitors, AND A FRIDGE. when we asked for something similar, they told us to go outside and work there. the core problem is that they let in waaaaaaay too many illustration students, and then they don’t have the space/funding to accommodate us. on term it typically takes 1-2 hours to meet with an adviser to get one question answered or get one form signed because we have ONE ADVISER. stuff like that. the teachers speak out but nothing changes. students speak out and we’re told to be quiet. it’s really disheartening.

anonymous asked:

hey pu, since you're on the topic of portfolios, I was wondering if you think fanart is okay for admissions portfolios, obviously some have requirements but in your opinion, what do you think?

Okay, that’s where it’s different!

I would keep fanart out of submission portfolios. This applies ESPECIALLY to art colleges, because so many of the professors (and I say this with love because a bunch of professors I loved had the same mentality) have super special snowflake syndrome and tend to prescribe to ART IS ALL THE TIME PROFOUND, ART IS THE SOUL, ART IS THE LIFE BLOOD FLOWING THROUGH MY VEINS, ART IS— THE PUREST— REPRESENTATION… OR YOUR ~~*~*~* ORIGINALITY~*~*~*~ and WORTH as an applicant to their fine institution. 

(and the best part with that is that I went to calarts, which is Cartoon College University… not even a fine arts school! aha)

A few people on admissions won’t care, but a lot of the time the people that are heads of admission WILL care.

This doesn’t apply to colleges that auto accept you (you know the types!), and it should be noted you can probably get away with some fan art as a supplementary piece. I think I had caricatures of Angela Lansbury and George Hearn as Mrs Lovett and Sweeney Todd in my entrance portfolio?

but really keep it on the low end, do not submit anime (probably ever, i’d say), and i’d probably stick to “Artsy” or “widely accepted” characters if at all. Also re-draws and exact style copies are generally no-nos. Being able to copy styles exactly is a very valuable asset in the industry, but even there you want to be careful with your presentation. You better absolutely show that it’s not a copy and that you drew it on your own (with an understanding of how the style works.)

Studios don’t care, but art colleges (especially ones that police their entrance) really do.  I’m speaking largely, largely from a calarts pov, but I applied to several, several schools so I think it’s okay to speak a little more widely.