enticing photos

why can’t instagram captions just flow naturally out of me??? that way i wouldn’t have to sweat for 10 minutes trying to craft an enticing description of my photo only to end up just deleting the whole thing and posting 3 emojis 

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Madonna photographed in Alphabet City by Richard Corman, 1982.

Richard Corman had just finished an apprenticeship with Richard Avedon in 1982 and was referred to Madonna by his mother who was casting Martin Scorsece’s “The Last Temptation of Christ”.  At the time, Madonna was an aspiring dancer, actress, and singer. She had auditioned for the movie and Richard’s mother saw something special in the unknown Madonna that her son could capture on film with some modeling and audition shots. On their first outing in 1982, Madonna walked Richard Corman around her neighborhood, using anything she came across as a casual backdrop for an afternoon of shooting. “I followed her around the Lower East Side,” says Richard. “She was so comfortable — it was as if she was in her own backyard.” 

Iconic photographer Richard Corman remembers the first time he met Madonna. He told Rolling Stone magazine:

“[It was] in the summer of 1982 at her apartment on the Lower East Side. Prior to entering the building, I had to call her from a phone booth from across the street as she let me know, under no uncertain terms, that I was not to enter the building without her alerting all of the tenants due to a lot of illegal activity going on, on the stoop and on the ground floor – which she had no part in… There was a group of kids outside the building, on the stoop, in the hallways, and when I said I was there for Madonna the seas parted. I looked up the staircase, and I saw this girl leaning over the edge of the banister, and even from three stories below I could see these catlike eyes just looking down. I knew at that moment that she had something special — I really did.”

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This beautiful Tintin tome is full of all wonderful things Hergé

Tintin: The Art of Hergé
by Michel Daubert
Harry N. Abrams
2013, 480 pages, 8.5 x 8.5 x 1.8 inches (paperback)
$31 Buy one on Amazon

If you’re a fan of Tintin comics and of Hergé (Georges Remi), this is one book you’ll want to own. Nothing “comic book” or throw away about this beautifully produced volume. The form factor and details are wonderful: a square format with an elegant embossed black and white drawing close-up of Tintin with his trademark quiff on the cover. It has also red- and white-checkerboard page edges, just like the iconic rocket ship from “Destination Moon.” This one will display nicely with the rest of your Tintin collectibles.

It won’t stay on the display shelf for long. The 480 pages inside are just as delightful. It’s full of colorful images of all things Hergé, from enticing photos of the Hergé Museum in Brussels (you’ll want to go!), to artifacts and models used in the production of the Tintin books, snapshots and promotional pictures of Hergé, and lots of images of actual camera art.

You’ll see up close and in detail how Hergé created his books, from preliminary rough sketches and figure drawings, pencil layouts and revisions, reference materials and photography, original camera art line (with all the corrections) and the final colored print version. A real look “inside” that the comic fan will appreciate. – Bob Knetzger

August 31, 2015