entertainment geekly

…But isn’t it weird that, by the final action sequence, Black Widow’s main role is the same role as Pepper Potts in Iron Man, or Jane Foster in Thor: The lady who helps her man become a hero? “I adore you,” she tells Bruce Banner, right before she forces him to Hulk out and save the day. He also saves her life, and then makes the executive decision to disappear—To protect her, I guess? Even though the last time they talked, she made it pretty clear that she didn’t need to be protected?
And don’t even get me started on Spider-Man 3, which is not a good movie, but which has an INCREDIBLE arc for Mary Jane. Seriously, watch what Kirsten Dunst gets to play in Spider-Man 3—professional frustration, failure, desperation, suspicions that the man she loves has become a very different person even before an alien symbiote gives him bad hair—and ask yourself how many actresses in superhero movies since 2007 have gotten even half that.
Maybe it’s time to rewrite the Bill of Rights for Fandom. To demand that everyone take a breath and realize that even great things aren’t perfect and even very bad things can be interesting. To acknowledge that The Thing You Like is not the Greatest Thing Ever just because you like it; indeed, to admit that your own personal preferences are interesting specifically because they are personal, because not everyone has to like everything that you like all of the time.
—  Shots fired by Darren Franich in his new Entertainment Geekly column: ‘Breaking Bad,’ 'Lost,’ and the precarious hysteria of TV fandom.
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Saw this from Entertainment Geekly. Thought it was pretty cool. :)

Entertainment Geekly's new rules for spoilers

Generally Speaking: Don’t be a douchebag.

For TV Shows That Release A New Episode Every Week: 24-hour grace period; no putting the name of the character who died in headlines or in tweets. But you are allowed to use code names or hashtags or otherwise non-specific descriptors that refer to The Thing That Happened, like “The Red Wedding” or “Six Minute Tracking Shot” or “Tread Lightly.” After 24 hours, it’s open season.

For TV Shows That Aired Months Ago in Britain: If you are the kind of person who watches the shows when they first air — presumably totally legally, when you’re visiting your British cousin specifically just to watch British television — then it is incumbent on you to presage anything you say about unaired episodes with “Well, I’ve already seen the season, so-” at which point everyone you’re talking to will cut you off.

For TV Shows That Release All Their Episodes At Once, Like Netflix:
24-hour grace period for the first episode of any all-in-one season, followed by a one-week grace period for the first four episodes, two weeks for 5-8, and three weeks for the full season.

For TV Shows Based on Books or Comic Books: Readers can talk about everything EXCEPT for character deaths. Also, everyone can do their best not to be a douchebag.

For Movies In General
Anything that happens in the first half-hour in a movie is not a spoiler. Everything after the first half hour should be clearly marked with a SPOILER ALERT until two Mondays after their release. Movies that initially open in limited release get a one-month grace period from their opening.

For Movies Based On Things: Movie adaptations are actually less problematic than their TV counterparts, since lately there’s been a rather exciting trend of films departing wildly from the source material. But in the interest of not being a douchebag, one ought always to err on the side of not ruining the movie experience.

For Videogames: Same three-week grace period as the season finales of binge-released TV shows. Not that it matters much, since there don’t seem to be any videogames coming out anymore.

For Books, mainly YA franchises: A two-week SPOILER ALERT grace period should be granted, since some readers have to go to school and do their homework, while other readers have to go to work and suffer from the crushing certainty that they should probably be reading a grown-up book.

And If You Live in California: Don’t go on any social media for three hours before your favorite show airs. Because we’re watching it on the East Coast, and we’ll probably talk about it. Get over yourself; you got all the good weather in this deal.

(More lengthy explanations for these rules are right over here.)

Spoilery review:

“…But isn’t it weird that, by the final action sequence, Black Widow’s main role is the same role as Pepper Potts in Iron Man, or Jane Foster in Thor: The lady who helps her man become a hero? “I adore you,” she tells Bruce Banner, right before she forces him to Hulk out and save the day. He also saves her life, and then makes the executive decision to disappear—To protect her, I guess? Even though the last time they talked, she made it pretty clear that she didn’t need to be protected?”— Entertainment Geekly: The Black Widow Conundrum

Am I crazy? Why does no one see Natasha’s heroic arc? It’s so obvious to me!

Natasha believes she has a home and a purpose as an Avenger, and she believes she can have love, too. Then her confidence is shaken and she contemplates running away with at least that last part. But when the moment comes she can’t do it. She’s a hero. She’ll jeopardize her shot at love to save the damn day, and she’ll look at the clouds and say, “This isn’t a bad view to die with,” and she’ll survive and be sad but she’ll stay and fight as an Avenger (even while four of her male counterparts choose otherwise).

What’s more, she forces Hulk to save the day, because one of her jobs is to be the Hulk Tamer. She doesn’t inspire Bruce to accept his heroic nature. She flat-out makes a call and throws him into an abyss. She takes away his agency for the greater good. That’s gonna leave a mark on them both.

Plus, Bruce leaving isn’t about protecting her anymore, they hashed that out at the farm! It’s about what Bruce fantasizes about (laying low, doing good as himself, ever turning into the Hulk) does not at this juncture align with Natasha’s dream of being an Avenger. They want fundamentally different things.

Are we so used to the same stories over and over again that we literally can’t see anything else? I’m in loop! What is this madness?