entertainer of the year

Did you say cheesy? Cheesy is one of the words banned in my world. I’m tired of sincerity being something we have to be afraid of doing. It’s been like that for 20 years, that the entertainment and art world has shied away from sincerity, real sincerity, because they feel they have to wink at the audience because that’s what the kids like. We have to do real stories now. The world is in crisis.

I wanted to tell a story about a hero who believes in love, who is filled with love, who believe in change and the betterment of mankind. I believe in it. It’s terrible when it makes so many artists afraid to be sincere and truthful and emotional, and relegates them to the too-cool-for-school department. Art is supposed to bring beauty to the world.

—  Patty Jenkins, director of Wonder Woman
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she had the world // panic! at the disco

uproxx.com
You Aren't Imagining It, 'Wonder Woman' Isn't Being Well Promoted
With only a month and change to go, Warner Bros. seems to have little interest in promoting 'Wonder Woman.'

“When Suicide Squad came out, you couldn’t escape the world’s worst heroes. They were everywhere, despite the average audience-goer knowing only who Harley Quinn and the Joker were due to pop culture osmosis. Everyone knows who Wonder Woman is. Yet a quick look at the playlist for Suicide Squad vs. Wonder Woman on the official Warner Bros. YouTube page is as different as night and day.



Approximately a month before Warner Bros. releases one of their biggest films of the year, one that will go down in entertainment history one way or another simply for being the first film starring Princess Diana, the company has released three trailers and two “Tilt Brush” videos explaining the concept art. 

At the same point in the marketing cycle for Suicide Squad, the villainous flick already had three trailers, four TV spots, a “Buy Advanced Tickets” promotional video, and fun little biographies for each member of the team. That’s a hell of a lot more promotion for a B-string list of heroes (at best) than for WONDER WOMAN.

Read the full piece here

Speaking for myself, I have seen exactly ONE commercial so far and that was two nights ago! Where I live they were showing Suicide Squad ads on basically a non-stop loop this far out from the release of SS.

HEY WARNER “BROS”!!!

Cheesy is one of the words banned in my world. I’m tired of sincerity being something we have to be afraid of doing. It’s been like that for 20 years, that the entertainment and art world has shied away from sincerity, real sincerity, because they feel they have to wink at the audience because that’s what the kids like. We have to do the real stories now. The world is in crisis.

I wanted to tell a story about a hero who believes in love, who is filled with love, who believes in change and the betterment of mankind. I believe in it. It’s terrible when it makes so many artists afraid to be sincere and truthful and emotional, and relegates them to the too-cool-for-school department. Art is supposed to bring beauty to the world.

Director Patty Jenkins on Wonder Woman

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@cheshirerabit said: Shit, your teacher Bakugou idea is something I never considered but now think would be really cool. Cuz he would not stop being a hero but he wouldn’t half-ass being a teacher so it would be like how All Might attempted to hero and teach but could actually work. Plus, I’m all for Bakugou’s role model switching with time to Aizawa. 10/10 idea.

Anon said: OMG Fran now i want to see Teacher or Older Bakugou or or Bakugou with Aizawa

Bless both of you for giving me a reason to talk about this cause honestly I love this idea way more than striktly necessary - this!!! is how I like to think it would go down:

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Did you say cheesy? Cheesy is one of the words banned in my world. I’m tired of sincerity being something we have to be afraid of doing. It’s been like that for 20 years, that the entertainment and art world has shied away from sincerity, real sincerity, because they feel they have to wink at the audience because that’s what the kids like. We have to do the real stories now. The world is in crisis. I wanted to tell a story about a hero who believes in love, who is filled with love, who believes in change and the betterment of mankind. I believe in it. It’s terrible when it makes so many artists afraid to be sincere and truthful and emotional, and relegates them to the too-cool-for-school department. Art is supposed to bring beauty to the world.
—  Patty Jenkins, Director of Wonder Woman

Matt said yes guys, what a surprise, wow.


HAPPY FIRST ANNIVERSARY OF TECHIENICIAN!
(Oldest post is here, and here’s the first content for the ship. I don’t know who picked the name “Techienician”, please tell me if you know! I’d love to credit them here :D).

okay but can we just talk about how great it is that seokjin is going on all of these variety shows and how hes so silly and effortlessly funny and honestly really good at it??? and like this boy whos been relentlessly told that hes useless to the group, talent-less, unfunny, just a pretty face, etc. continues to be praised and complimented by show producers and by people who have been in the entertainment industry for years??? like im so proud of him and im so happy that he’s been given the opportunities to shine through doing these shows. he deserves it. so much. 

In a heartfelt tweet last night, Aaron Carter came out about his sexuality, saying that he’s found “boys and girls attractive” since he was 13. 

While he didn’t specifically use the word “bisexual” or any other label in his tweet, Billboard magazine says they were able to confirm that Carter was coming out as bisexual. 

Here’s the text of the tweet in its entirety: 

To start off, I would like to say that I love each and EVERY ONE of my fans. There’s something I’d like to say that I feel is important for myself and my identity that has been weighing on my chest for nearly half of my life.

This doesn’t bring me shame, just a weight and burden that I have held onto for a long time that I would like lifted off of me. I grew up in this entertainment industry at a very young age and when I was around 13 years old I started to find boys and girls attractive. There were years that went by that I thought about it, but it wasn’t until I was 17 years old, after a few relationships with girls, I had an experience with a male that I had an attraction to who I also worked with and grew up with.

To me music has always been my temple. Music will ALWAYS be what transcends all of us and myself. The studio has always been my safe haven. But the ultimate goal for me is to be satisfied. I never want to be a figure of disappointment. 

The best quote to sum: “I’ve never felt as though I didn’t belong, I just acted as though I did.” -Boy George

Aaron was my very first childhood crush, and this is a really beautiful moment for him to share, especially since he’s had a bit of a rough year. Congrats, friend. (via Billboard)

even pledis is shocked lol

its a weird time to be a fan of transformers toys right now

see, since the entertainment industry realized that China is a massive untapped market a couple of years ago, Hasbro has started making this MASSIVE marketing push in China

so basically, China has all of the latest Transformers toys on shelves. always well stocked, always up to date, always readily available

meanwhile, outside of China, the rest of the world is struggling to find the latest releases. hasbro just… isn’t shipping stock to western stores.

so what’s happening as a result?

Chinese companies, namely Wei Jiang and Kubianbao, have started releasing extremely high quality counterfeit versions of official Hasbro toys. Not just cheapo knockoffs, properly high quality fakes that are better than the Hasbro releases.

Can’t find the 20 dollar official Hasbro Megatron toy? Buy Wei Jiang’s counterfeit version! It’s 45 dollars, readily available online, it’s twice the size of Hasbro’s one, it has several improvements made to the figure’s engineering over Hasbro’s version, AND they added die cast metal to it. 

So what’s happening is that fans outside of China are importing chinese bootlegs of Hasbro’s toys because they’re objectively better and more readily available than Hasbro’s official releases.

And they’re more readily available because Hasbro is focusing marketing on China right now.

And, if my research is correct, Wei Jiang and Kubianbao’s counterfeit offerings are often sold in the same stores as Hasbro’s official stuff, and Chinese fans prefer buying the counterfeit stuff because it’s better.

So, because Hasbro started trying to maket heavily to China to the point that they’re neglecting markets in the rest of the world, they’re losing sales all over the world to Chinese counterfeiters because the Counterfeit toys are better and easier to find.

And the Chinese audience they’re marketing so heavily to prefers the knockoffs to the official releases anyway. Because the knockoffs are better.

Rap Monster of Breakout K-Pop Band BTS on Fans, Fame and Viral Popularity

BTS may be the biggest musical act you’ve never heard of — unless you’re already one of the Korean pop group’s millions-strong fanbase. The seven-member boy band, Bangtan Sonyeondan (or BTS for short), is know for their catchy pop-rap, sharp music video choreography and candid social media presence. They’ve recently leveraged their popularity into blockbuster stadium tours and Billboard’s prize for Top Social Artists of the year, as well as nabbing a spot on TIME’s list of 25 Most Influential People on the Internet.

It’s not hard to see why: a live video of two members applying face masks roped in half a million concurrent viewers. Their backstage selfies regularly rack up half a million likes. A red carpet appearance can kick off a global Twitter trend. But how did they get here?

“We’re just a normal group of boys from humble backgrounds who had a lot of passion and a dream to be famous,” says singer and songwriter Kim Nam-joon, who goes by the moniker Rap Monster and, as the only English-speaking member of the group, often represents BTS in interviews. Currently on tour in Japan, Rap Monster took the time to explain BTS’ rise and how the group feeds its hungry fanbase.

How did the BTS group come together?

Rap Monster: Back in 2010, I was introduced to Mr. Bang [Bang Si Hyuk], our executive producer [and CEO of BigHit Entertainment]. I was an underground rapper and only 16 years old, a freshman at high school. Bang thought I had potential as a rapper and lyricist, and we went from there. Then SUGA joined us. [Third group member] J-hope was really popular as a dancer in his hometown. We were the first three! We debuted as a collaboration between the seven of us in June 2013. We came together with a common dream to write, dance and produce music that reflects our musical backgrounds as well as our life values of acceptance, vulnerability and being successful. The seven of us have pushed each other to be the best we can be for the last four years. It has made us as close as brothers. BTS as a group sort of took off with the success of our 2015 album that had our hit single “I NEED U.”

When did you first realize you were developing a global fandom?

We didn’t realize we were becoming famous until we were invited to KCONs [K-pop music festivals] in the U.S. and Europe in 2014 or 2015. Thousands of fans were calling our name at the venue, and almost everyone memorized the Korean lyrics of our songs, which was amazing and overwhelming. Who would have thought that people from across the ocean, Europe, the U.S., South America, even Tahiti, would love our songs and performances, just by watching them on YouTube? We were just grateful… and we still are.

BTS has millions of followers on every social media platform. How do you interact with your fans online? What kind of connections are you making?

We mostly interact with our Twitter messages by uploading selfies, [sharing] music recommendations and street fashion photos, etc. It’s about our daily life as a band on tour — and also as a group of silly friends who make fun of one another backstage. We don’t really get to reply to fans on a regular basis because there are just so many of them. But we do try to read all the reactions and replies. It’s also always interesting and inspiring for us to see what they create for us.

Why do you think you’ve been able to build such a massive online fanbase? How did it happen?

Everyone asks us that question. It’s a team effort taken from what happens to us in our everyday life. It’s not easy to run a social media account over a long period of time, but we love communicating with our fans every day and night. For example, I use the hashtag #RMusic to introduce or recommend a song I like, and I’ve been doing that for a long time. I love music and I truly enjoy sharing with our fans. Music transcends language. BTS communicates with our fans by staying true to ourselves and believing in music every day.

How does having this huge fandom impact your approach to music and to what you sing about?

BTS fans — the “ARMY” — tell us about their feelings, failures, passions and struggles all the time. We are often inspired by [them], because we try to write about how real young people — like the seven of us — face real-life issues. Most of our music is about how we perceive the world and how we try to persist as normal, average human beings. So our fans inspire us and give us a direction to go as musicians. And of course, their love and support keeps us going.

How is BTS different from other big K-pop groups? Is it your music, your engagement with supporters, or something else?

I can’t speak for other artists; every group has a different approach. For us, it will always be important to keep working hard, dancing better, writing better songs, touring and setting an example. A lot of people say this, but it’s really true for us: we are living a dream, all seven of us, being able to pursue what we love. We strive to [put] everything into our music. Our lyrics deal with real issues that face all humans: choices in life, depression, self-esteem. And the fans know that we are there for them, and they are there for us.

What’s next? What are you most excited for?

Well, we definitely continue to have big dreams. We tour all over the world, but the shows in the U.S. really opened our eyes to so many new things in the States. And when we won the Billboard Music Award, we were so honored and got to meet so many artists that we love and admire that we can’t wait to return to the States.

© Raisa Bruner @ TIME