enrollment numbers

College WordBank!

There are a lot of words that may seem new and weird throughout college applications, so here is a list of words that I defined in order to help you glide through the application process!

The Basics: Treat Yo Self! (and know the facts!)


1. Undergraduate: An undergraduate student is someone who is obtaining an undergraduate education or degree, such as a Bachelor’s degree.

2. Private University: A Private University is a college that is privately funded. They tend to be smaller than public universities as well.

3. Public University: A Public University is a college that is publicly funded, specifically through the national government. They tend to be larger than private universities.

4. Safety School: When applying to colleges, a safety school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is lower than your stats, which indicates that it may be easier for you to get in (since you have higher stats than the average).

5. Target School: A target school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is similar to your stats, which indicates that you are the same level as other applicants.

6. Reach School: A reach school is a college where the stats of a typical student admitted is higher than your stats, indicating that it is a more competitive college.

7. College Confidential: A website full of threads and information about college admissions. Although some of the pages found on College Confidential are helpful, there are some things found on this site that may discourage you for no apparent reason, such as “Chance Me” threads. Therefore, I advise you to steer clear of College Confidential and, by all means, do not let it get to your head!

8. “Chance Me’s”: “Chance Me” are threads found online where people write their stats and ask for others to see if they can get accepted to a specific college. I advise you NOT to trust these things, as people online do not know your chances of getting into a specific school.

9. Common App: Also known as the Common Application, the Common App is an application used for undergraduate admissions to a multitude of colleges. A majority of colleges accept the Common App, but I suggest looking in on the ones you want to apply to in order to know for sure.

10. Universal College Application: Similar to the Common App, the Universal College Application is also a site used by many people to send their college applications.

11. SAT II’s: Also known as SAT Subject Tests, the SAT II’s are exams that are taken in specific subject areas, such as Biology, Math I/II, and US History. Many colleges do not require SAT Subject Tests. However, it is important to check and see if some colleges require you to take an SAT Subject Test, or if it is optional. Although it may be optional for the college, it is still your decision if you would like to take this exam or not for admission purposes.

12. Transcript: A report of all the grades you have received in each class that you have taken during high school. Colleges require an official transcript to be sent to the admissions office.

13. Recommendation Letter: A letter that details why you are an excellent fit in said college. These letters usually come from teachers, faculty, coaches, mentors, etc. Recommendation letters should NOT be written by a family member.

14. Personal Statement: A Personal Statement is basically a college essay. Many colleges require you to write at least one, while others require more than one essay.

15. Need Blind Admissions: Need-Blind Admissions is when colleges will decide on your admissions decision without looking at your financial information. To clarify, this means that the college will decide on your admissions decision solely on your application and not on your financial information.

16. Waitlisted: Waitlisted is sort of the middle ground for colleges. When you are waitlisted, it does not mean that you are accepted or rejected. Instead, it means that you are put on a “waiting list” and, if the colleges enrollment numbers from their accepted students are lower than expected, they will accept more people from the waitlist.  

17. Deferred: Deferred is when a college pushes your application to the next filing period. This means that you have not been accepted or rejected yet. Instead, the college has pushed your application in order to review it again and make a final decision. A deferral only happens if you have applied Early Action or Early Decision.

18. Legacy (Applicant): A legacy applicant is someone who is applying to a college that a family member has went to, usually their parents.


Types of Applications (it’s “ED” as one, two, three! Get it!?)


1. ED/Early Decision: A type of application filing period where you are able to apply early, but it is binding. This means that if you are accepted to said college under Early Decision, you are required to go there upon acceptance. Usually, the application deadline is in November and admission decisions are in Mid-December. Something to note about this is that you can apply to only one school with an “Early Decision” (since it is binding), but you can apply to other schools with a different filing period, such as Early Action and Regular Decision.

2. EA/Early Action: A type of application filing period where you are able to apply early, but it is not binding. This means that you are applying earlier than the normal application period and you will NOT be required to go to said college upon acceptance. Similar to ED, Early Action’s deadline is around November, but the admissions decision’s date varies. Unlike the Early Decision, you can apply to as many Early Action’s as you want (unless Single Choice Early Action, more on that below)

3. Single Choice/Restrictive Early Action: This is a type of application filing period where you are only allowed to apply to one Early Action school. However, this means that Single Choice/Restrictive Early Action is still non-binding (not required to go upon acceptance), but you can only apply to one school under Early Action. Similar to ED, you are able to apply to colleges under other types of filing periods, such as Regular Decision.

4. RD/Regular Decision: This is the normal time when applications are due. Regular Decision is the time when most people apply to colleges. The applications are usually due in January and results typically come out in March (although, it may vary depending on the college). Regular Decisions are non-binding and you can apply to as many as you want.

5. Rolling Admissions: This is a type of application filing period when you apply to a college and the college admissions office reviews them as they receive the applications. Unlike ED/EA/RD, Rolling Admissions does not have a set date where you can go and look for your college admissions decision. Typically, the college will give you a time frame in which they will give you your admission decision, which is possibly around 2-8 weeks depending on the college. Something to note is that a lot of colleges with Rolling Admissions may not have a distinct deadline for the application, but they will have a “priority deadline” where, if you submit your application before that date, then they will get back to you sooner. Overall, the earlier you submit your application for Rolling Admissions, the quicker you will know your decision.

6. Open Admission: This is a type of application filing where colleges accept all students, as long as they have completed high school or have a GED.


Financial Aid: Dolla Dolla Bills Y'All!


1. Grant: A grant is money that you receive in your financial aid packet that you will NOT have to pay back.

2. Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back.

3. Scholarships: A scholarship is money earned due to certain achievements, such as academic, athletic, etc. Similar to a grant, it is money given to you that you do not need to pay back. However, for a scholarship, it may be awarded by the college or awarded separately by applying for one.

4. FAFSA: Also known as the “Free Application for Federal Student Aid”, the FAFSA is a website that most colleges will advise you to use in order to receive financial aid from colleges. The FAFSA application will ask for information on your household’s tax forms in order to determine how much grant and loan money you may receive. The FAFSA application opens on January 1st of every year, but deadlines for completing the application varies for every college. Something to note is that you will need to apply for Financial Aid every year in order to receive aid while you are in college.

5. CSS Profile: Also known as the “College Scholarship Service Profile”, the CSS Profile is found on the College Board website where you apply in order to receive more financial aid. Many colleges require the CSS Profile (and sometimes early on), so I advise you to see if it is required.

6. Expected Family Contribution (EFC): This is a number found on your FAFSA that provides an estimate of the amount of money your family will be expected to pay for your education. To note, this estimate is the amount of money you will be expected to pay after financial aid is accounted for.

7. Institutional Grant: An institutional grant is money given by the college that you do not have to pay back. This is different compared to the federal grant, since the federal grant is provided by the government instead of the college itself.

8. Merit-Based Grants: These are grants that are made due to academic achievement.

9. Need-Based Grants: These grants are given to students due to their level of income.

10. Federal Pell Grant: This grant is money that the federal government gives you that you will NOT pay back.

11. Institutional Loans: An institutional loan is money given by the college that you have to pay back. This is different than the federal loans, since the federal loans are provided by the government instead of the college itself.

12. Direct Subsidized Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back to the college. The Direct Subsidized Loan is a federal loan that pays the loan’s interest while you are in college. However, once your undergraduate education is completed, you will be required to start paying the Direct Subsidized Loan (Note: this loan allows a six month grace period before you starting paying).

13. Direct Unsubsidized Loan: A loan is money that you receive in your financial aid packet and, if you accept, will have to pay back to the college. The Direct Unsubsidized Loan is a federal loan that does not pay the loan’s interest while you are in college. This means that, as you continue through college, you are responsible for paying the loan’s interest. However, if you decide you don’t want to pay the loan’s interest while in college, then the interest will be added to the principal (or the original loan’s amount).

14. Perkins Loan: The Perkins Loan is given to students depending on their school, as some schools do not participate in the Perkins Loan. Similar to all loans, it is money borrowed now that must be paid back later. However, unlike the other loans stated here, this loan is a college issued loan instead of a federal loan, meaning that the money is paid back to the college not the government.

15. (Parent) PLUS Loan: A PLUS Loan is a loan taken out on the parents name for an undergraduate student. This means that parents with undergraduate students may use this money for college expenses. PLUS Loans are to be paid back to the federal government.

16. Work Study Program: The Work Study Program is one in which a student may hold a job on campus while earning their degree/education. You can apply for the Work Study Program through the FAFSA application. The money you earn from this job can be used on anything, from tuition to food, etc.


You’re In College! Now what… (Everything you need to know while in college)


1. Major: A specific area that an undergraduate student focuses on during college. The student must follow and complete the courses stated in their specified major in order to receive their degree.  

2. Minor: Although it is not required, some undergraduate students choose a minor in order to have a secondary focus. If you choose to minor, you do not receive another degree. Instead, minoring in something during college is solely for your own personal interest and to expand your knowledge.

3. Double Major: When you double major in something it means that you are following two specified areas. Double Majors receive two degrees for the areas in which they studied.

4. Undeclared: To be undeclared in college is to not choose a major/degree. Many people go into college undeclared, while some are even undeclared up until their second year of college. However, depending on your college, there may be a specific time or deadline to declare a major, since you will eventually be required to have one in order to obtain a degree.

5. Placement Test: A placement test is a preliminary test in order to see what level you are in specific subjects. These are normally taken when you have selected a college to attend (as an entering college freshman) and must register for classes. Also, something to note, all colleges do not have placement tests.

6. Bursar Office: The Bursar Office is the branch of the college that takes care of payments and billing statements for the student.

7. Financial Aid Office: The Financial Aid Office is the branch of the college that takes care of the financial aid aspect for the student, such as determining grant money.

8. Registrar: The Registrar Office is where they handle student records and scheduling for the college.

9. Commuting/Commuter: A commuter is a student who travels to college from where they reside. This is a longer distance than the typical five minutes off campus.

10. Transfer Student: A transfer student is someone who is changing from one college to another. Most people who change colleges decide once they know that their credits will transfer to the next college.

“To be governed is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be governed is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the public interest, to be placed under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonoured. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality.”
- Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

Roommate Drama and Housing Woes

Like most colleges, the first year dorms at EU have the occasional room that is ever so slightly larger than the others. The kind that get made into triples where everyone is even more crowded together than normal until desperate pleas with housing find an opening and someone moves out. Or not.

Aubree, Bridget and Fay were assigned to such a room, but Fay never showed up on move-in day. When the RA didn’t seem to notice, Aubree and Bridget quickly agreed not to mention it in hope that they could avoid someone else taking the spot and each get a little more personal space.

Over the next few weeks, Bridget began to notice how some things were just slightly off about the campus and some of the people. She remembered the half-said tales of her childhood, and started to take Certain Precautions, all while telling herself it was silly and the product of an overactive imagination.

Aubree, on the other hand, had never had much in the way of roots. Their parents favored found family over blood relations for reasons never clearly shared, and Aubree was always quick to welcome potential friends with open arms. The extra bed was kept made up nicely to continue to fool the RA, so why not offer it to anyone needing a place to lay their head?

This caused some understandable friction between the roommates, but neither of them yet appreciated the entirely real danger the habit represented.

One night, just as the first round of tests that informs everyone’s add-drop decisions was in full swing, Aubree was walking back to the room from the library. They were a bit disoriented; could have sworn some of those hallways couldn’t have really fit in the building? And they nearly ran into a short figure.

Hurried apologies, followed by reassurances that felt like being softly smothered in cool silk. Conversation happened as it does, and before long Aubree was offering the stranger safe harbor for the night from which to consider the merits of several interesting classes that couldn’t all fit in a single schedule.

Bridget woke up and immediately knew something was wrong. She second-guessed herself once she consciously processed that it was Aubree and another surprise guest. A problem for the morning.

The next day was the beginning of terrific adventures that neither collegiate had expected nor ever wanted as they found that they now had a de facto third roommate in the form of a young member of the gentry eager to take the place of Fay in not just room assignment, but student ID number and enrollment. Thankfully for all involved, new-Fay is much more mischievous than outright malevolent. Having just come into power her first priority is to grow a store of knowledge in order put it to best use.

Bridget still has to quickly bring Aubree up to speed on the precariousness they must now navigate. No, “Fay” liking us does not mean “all’s good then.” No, we can’t just ask her to leave. Yes, I am quite serious about the never saying “Thank You” thing. So on, so forth, through many uncertain times. If we can just survive the year, surely we won’t be randomly housed with her again? One can hope.

x

Proof of Life!

Hi friends!  Things have been a little crazy around here, so I haven’t posted in a bit.  At the end of the day, my brain isn’t good for much more than falling into bed to read for a bit.  I wanted to say thank you to everyone who sent messages!  I am totally fine, and Austin wasn’t in any danger at all–we had a weekend of non-stop rain and some strong winds, but nothing scary. This biggest thing we’re dealing with at the moment is that some stupid news story made a big deal about there being a gas shortage (which there isn’t), so everyone panicked and now there are insane lines for gas and many of the pumps around town are actually empty because people were filling up barrels and numerous gas cans despite the RR Commissioner, Mayor, and other officials telling people that their behavior was the only thing that would cause problems.  *sigh*

Austin ISD is enrolling a large number of evacuees, so our office has been working with them on providing volunteers, books, and supplies, so I’ve been busy!  My cousin’s house did end up flooding and his pregnant wife and daughter were evacuated by boat while he stayed behind with their animals.  The roads to his house are open now, and we’re heading down there tomorrow morning to help tear up carpeting and remove drywall, etc.  My family is super tiny, and my cousin and I were close growing up because he’s an only child and my brother and I are his only first cousins. With all the devastation, it’s helpful to be able to physically do something in addition to donating and arranging assistance through work. Miraculously, we were even able to find a hotel with a vacancy nearby!

I’ll likely be busy this weekend and unable to update, but I wanted to thank everyone for thinking of me and checking in! All good here in my area of Texas! <3

Meta I’ve had on the back-burner for a couple of weeks now, but let’s talk about the garage scene in episode 7 and the concept of uchi/soto! It’s a really interesting part of Japanese culture, and this has probably been the biggest piece of cultural miscommunication between Victor and Yuuri in the show so far. :D

Uchi/soto translates roughly to inside/outside, and put very simply, it’s how you classify social groupings and social interactions in Japan. It is, among other things, how you know what level of polite language to use with whoever you’re talking to, but it also affects your position in society, and your responsibilities.

Basically, any group you’re a part of, be it your family, your school, your work place, your extra-curricular clubs, etc, that’s uchi. Everyone else is soto. There are various levels, of course, as some groups are “more” uchi than others, so who’s considered uchi vs soto at any given time depends on context. It’s like a Venn diagram from hell or something.

Now, this is probably gonna sound weird to most people from Western cultures, because most Western cultures are highly individualistic and put the individual first, but: In Japan, your every action reflects on the uchi group as a whole, as seen by everyone soto.

If you’ve ever had a job (or school or activity, I guess) where you wear a uniform, you might have been told to act or not act a certain way when in uniform, or maybe even that if a customer yells at you for something, they’re not yelling at you personally, they’re yelling at the uniform. Japanese society is kind of like that, but played on nightmare difficulty, and you cannot take off your uniform.

Keep reading

Episode 1 Rambles

Since Sunshine season 2 is finally here, and I’ve decided to try and be a bit more active, I’ll be writing up my impressions on every episode along the way. Expect just general thoughts and overall I’m probably going to be pretty positive with all this. I find how I think about the previous episodes can color my expectation, so this’ll be mostly gushing about things I enjoyed with a few of my incoherent thoughts thrown in. Hopefully, I’ll get one of these done each week. Just don’t expect something all that polished because I wrote this as fresh off watching the episode as I could.

Don’t hesitate to message or ask me something if you think I missed something important, want me to expand on something I mentioned, or just want to talk about the show more.

Oh, and these might have a bit of a bias toward Chika. I’ll for sure discuss everything that happens because I love all of Aqours, but I tend to focus on Chika because I love her character. Figured I’d give that bit of warning.

All my season 2 stuff will be tagged with llss2, so if you want to avoid spoilers, that’d be the tag to look out for.

Keep reading

hey everyone text RESIST to 50409. it’ll connect you to a textbot that will contact your state representative. we all need to send letters to let them know to #DefendDACA

this Twitter thread (https://twitter.com/00ult/status/904552151262756864) has a lot of useful information. i never really talk about politics but this takes five minutes and it’s actually really important. 800,000 people’s lives are on the line and we can all help.


im not an expert on the topic but DACA essentially helps immigrants and their children get social security numbers, jobs, enrolled in school, among a lot of other important things. taking this away would hurt so many people, and trump WILL do it in 6 month’s time.


texting that number will walk you through sending a letter to your state’s senator, and it will send it for you. all you have to do is state that you want them to fight against trump taking DACA away. please, just take a few minutes to do this. the twitter thread I linked before has a sample letter you can copypaste.


thanks for reading, and please spread the word.

“To be GOVERNED is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so.“
– Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

A bit of rough worldbuilding that I might fit into CLV canon if I can.


“There you are, Hadrian!” Hermione calls out as she rounds the corner of a bookshelf and approaches his table.  “Cedric’s looking for you.  He wants to review a chapter of his Runes text that he says he doesn’t quite understand.”  She comes to a halt beside him, squinting curiously at the parchment in his hands. “That’s… You’ve been looking at that for a couple days now, haven’t you?  What are you working on?”

Keep reading

    To be governed is to be watched over, inspected, spied on, directed, legislated at, regulated, docketed, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, assessed, weighed, censored, ordered about, by men who have neither the right, nor the knowledge, nor the virtue to do so. To be governed is to be at every operation, at every transaction, noted, registered, enrolled, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under the pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be placed under contribution, trained, ransomed, exploited, monopolized, extorted, squeezed, mystified,   robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, despised, harassed, tracked, abused, clubbed, disarmed, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and, to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is it’s amorality.
    -Pierre-Joseph Proudhon

To be governed is to be watched, inspected, spied upon, directed, law-driven, numbered, regulated, enrolled, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, checked, estimated, valued, censured, commanded, by creatures who have neither the right nor the wisdom nor the virtue to do so. To be governed is to be at every operation, at every transaction noted, registered, counted, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, prevented, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be place under contribution, drilled, fleeced, exploited, monopolized, extorted from, squeezed, hoaxed, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, vilified, harassed, hunted down, abused, clubbed, disarmed, bound, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, derided, outraged, dishonored. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality.
—  Pierre-Joseph Proudhon, General Idea of the Revolution in the Nineteenth Century, translated by John Beverly Robinson (London: Freedom Press, 1923), pp. 293-294.”

nytimes.com
Days Before a Deadline, Trump Team Cancels Ads for Obama Health Plan
The ads would have run in the final days of the Affordable Care Act open enrollment period, which ends Tuesday. Many consumers tend to sign up just before the deadline.
By Robert Pear

The Affordable Care Act is still the law. People who would otherwise have no insurance can still get it. People who otherwise could not afford insurance can still get government subsidies. And people who ultimately end up without insurance are still subject to tax penalties.

But this way, you see, the Trump administration and Congress who want to repeal the ACA ASAP can ignore their constituents and point to lower enrollment numbers as supposed proof that the ACA is failing. That’s strategy!

Love Live! School Idol Project will be getting similar treatment to K-On. It’s also going to be getting a live action movie thanks to FOX and DLXD Entertainment (but a different team than the K-On live action remake). If you haven’t heard of it, Love Live! School Idol Project is an anime about a group of girls in an idol group that is formed in effort to save their school, Otonokizaka High from shutting down. Since the number of enrolling students dropping lower and lower every year, the school is set to shut down after its current first years graduate.

However, second year student Honoka Kousaka refuses to let it go without a fight and when searching for a solution, she comes across popular school idol group A-RISE and sets out to create a school idol group of her own with the help of her childhood friends to help raise awareness and popularity of her school.

After some struggles with getting everyone together, the group manages to get a full nine-member group. This western-made live action remake will remain faithful to the idea of saving their school with the school idol group. However, so there will be a point in watching, some changes will be made. The characters Umi, Rin, Maki, and Eli are going to be male in the remake, the latter two renamed Makito and Eri. 

By making this change, there will be more drama between the second year students. Not only that but there will also be romance between Rin and Hanayo. Other than that, character interactions will be pretty similar despite the gender changes.

“I love Love Live in its original form,” says lead director, Bobby Fulbright, “but when you get a really good idea, you just gotta go through with it.”

While the story will remain faithful to idea of saving the school, it will do its own thing with scenes not present in the anime. With Otonokizaka High now being co-ed, that much should have been obvious. There will be differences in the practice scenes and ultimately how it ends since it is based off the first season. The movie will begin with Honoka trying to get everyone together for an idol group and will end some time after the group performs in Love Live.

“I’m glad I got to work on such a project,” Bobby Fulbright continues, “we hope you’ll enjoy the final product.”

To be governed is to be watched over, inspected, spied on, directed, legislated at, regulated, docketed, indoctrinated, preached at, controlled, assessed, weighed, censored, ordered about, by men who have neither the right, nor the knowledge, nor the virtue. … To be governed is to be at every operation, at every transaction, noted, registered, enrolled, taxed, stamped, measured, numbered, assessed, licensed, authorized, admonished, forbidden, reformed, corrected, punished. It is, under the pretext of public utility, and in the name of the general interest, to be placed under contribution, trained, ransomed, exploited, monopolized, extorted, squeezed, mystified, robbed; then, at the slightest resistance, the first word of complaint, to be repressed, fined, despised, harassed, tracked, abused, clubbed, disarmed, choked, imprisoned, judged, condemned, shot, deported, sacrificed, sold, betrayed; and, to crown all, mocked, ridiculed, outraged, dishonoured. That is government; that is its justice; that is its morality.
—  Pierre-Joseph Proudhon
Perhaps the demographic changes that drove enrollment numbers down at schools like Dyett—indeed, the very ‘utilization crisis’ itself—did not arise by happenstance but through the machinations of where and how black people in Chicago have been allowed to live in the course of the last hundred years.

Fun fact did you know actually Natives weren’t citizens of the US until 1924 and we didn’t get the right to vote until 1956. We didn’t even get the same rights as everyone else. We weren’t even apart of the system. That’s why we have enrollment numbers. The government was keeping track of us like cattle before we became citizens of the US.

The official story of why the Obamacare enrollment numbers had to be “revised down” was that they “accidentally” over-counted people and it is only a coincidence that their mistake helped them sell it politically.

So, yet again, the official story from the supporters, creators, and current administrators of the Affordable Care Act is as follows:

“We are incompetent. We cannot run a website, and we cannot count… But we will solve healthcare.”