english-teacher

Synonyms for 95 Commonly Used Words
  1. Amazing — incredible, unbelievable, improbable, fabulous, wonderful, fantastic, astonishing, astounding, extraordinary
  2. Anger — enrage, infuriate, arouse, nettle, exasperate, inflame, madden
  3. Angry — mad, furious, enraged, excited, wrathful, indignant, exasperated, aroused, inflamed
  4. Answer — reply, respond, retort, acknowledge
  5. Ask — question, inquire of, seek information from, put a question to, demand, request, expect, inquire, query, interrogate, examine, quiz
  6. Awful — dreadful, terrible, abominable, bad, poor, unpleasant
  7. Bad — evil, immoral, wicked, corrupt, sinful, depraved, rotten, contaminated, spoiled, tainted, harmful, injurious, unfavourable, defective, inferior, imperfect, substandard, faulty, improper, inappropriate, unsuitable, disagreeable, unpleasant, cross, nasty, unfriendly, irascible, horrible, atrocious, outrageous, scandalous, infamous, wrong, noxious, sinister, putrid, snide, deplorable, dismal, gross, heinous, nefarious, base, obnoxious, detestable, despicable, contemptible, foul, rank, ghastly, execrable
  8. Beautiful — pretty, lovely, handsome, attractive, gorgeous, dazzling, splendid, magnificent, comely, fair, ravishing, graceful, elegant, fine, exquisite, aesthetic, pleasing, shapely, delicate, stunning, glorious, heavenly, resplendent, radiant, glowing, blooming, sparkling
  9. Begin — start, open, launch, initiate, commence, inaugurate, originate
  10. Big — enormous, huge, immense, gigantic, vast, colossal, gargantuan, large, sizable, grand, great, tall, substantial, mammoth, astronomical, ample, broad, expansive, spacious, stout, tremendous, titanic, mountainous
  11. Brave — courageous, fearless, dauntless, intrepid, plucky, daring, heroic, valorous, audacious, bold, gallant, valiant, doughty, mettlesome
  12. Break — fracture, rupture, shatter, smash, wreck, crash, demolish, atomize
  13. Bright — shining, shiny, gleaming, brilliant, sparkling, shimmering, radiant, vivid, colourful, lustrous, luminous, incandescent, intelligent, knowing, quick-witted, smart, intellectual
  14. Calm — quiet, peaceful, still, tranquil, mild, serene, smooth, composed, collected, unruffled, level-headed, unexcited, detached, aloof
  15. Come — approach, advance, near, arrive, reach
  16. Cool — chilly, cold, frosty, wintry, icy, frigid
  17. Crooked — bent, twisted, curved, hooked, zigzag
  18. Cry — shout, yell, yowl, scream, roar, bellow, weep, wail, sob, bawl
  19. Cut — gash, slash, prick, nick, sever, slice, carve, cleave, slit, chop, crop, lop, reduce
  20. Dangerous — perilous, hazardous, risky, uncertain, unsafe
  21. Dark — shadowy, unlit, murky, gloomy, dim, dusky, shaded, sunless, black, dismal, sad
  22. Decide — determine, settle, choose, resolve
  23. Definite — certain, sure, positive, determined, clear, distinct, obvious
  24. Delicious — savoury, delectable, appetizing, luscious, scrumptious, palatable, delightful, enjoyable, toothsome, exquisite
  25. Describe — portray, characterize, picture, narrate, relate, recount, represent, report, record
  26. Destroy — ruin, demolish, raze, waste, kill, slay, end, extinguish
  27. Difference — disagreement, inequity, contrast, dissimilarity, incompatibility
  28. Do — execute, enact, carry out, finish, conclude, effect, accomplish, achieve, attain
  29. Dull — boring, tiring„ tiresome, uninteresting, slow, dumb, stupid, unimaginative, lifeless, dead, insensible, tedious, wearisome, listless, expressionless, plain, monotonous, humdrum, dreary
  30. Eager — keen, fervent, enthusiastic, involved, interested, alive to
  31. End — stop, finish, terminate, conclude, close, halt, cessation, discontinuance
  32. Enjoy — appreciate, delight in, be pleased, indulge in, luxuriate in, bask in, relish, devour, savour, like
  33. Explain — elaborate, clarify, define, interpret, justify, account for
  34. Fair — just, impartial, unbiased, objective, unprejudiced, honest
  35. Fall — drop, descend, plunge, topple, tumble
  36. False — fake, fraudulent, counterfeit, spurious, untrue, unfounded, erroneous, deceptive, groundless, fallacious
  37. Famous — well-known, renowned, celebrated, famed, eminent, illustrious, distinguished, noted, notorious
  38. Fast — quick, rapid, speedy, fleet, hasty, snappy, mercurial, swiftly, rapidly, quickly, snappily, speedily, lickety-split, post-haste, hastily, expeditiously, like a flash
  39. Fat — stout, corpulent, fleshy, beefy, paunchy, plump, full, rotund, tubby, pudgy, chubby, chunky, burly, bulky, elephantine
  40. Fear — fright, dread, terror, alarm, dismay, anxiety, scare, awe, horror, panic, apprehension
  41. Fly — soar, hover, flit, wing, flee, waft, glide, coast, skim, sail, cruise
  42. Funny — humorous, amusing, droll, comic, comical, laughable, silly
  43. Get — acquire, obtain, secure, procure, gain, fetch, find, score, accumulate, win, earn, rep, catch, net, bag, derive, collect, gather, glean, pick up, accept, come by, regain, salvage
  44. Go — recede, depart, fade, disappear, move, travel, proceed
  45. Good — excellent, fine, superior, wonderful, marvellous, qualified, suited, suitable, apt, proper, capable, generous, kindly, friendly, gracious, obliging, pleasant, agreeable, pleasurable, satisfactory, well-behaved, obedient, honourable, reliable, trustworthy, safe, favourable, profitable, advantageous, righteous, expedient, helpful, valid, genuine, ample, salubrious, estimable, beneficial, splendid, great, noble, worthy, first-rate, top-notch, grand, sterling, superb, respectable, edifying
  46. Great — noteworthy, worthy, distinguished, remarkable, grand, considerable, powerful, much, mighty
  47. Gross — improper, rude, coarse, indecent, crude, vulgar, outrageous, extreme, grievous, shameful, uncouth, obscene, low
  48. Happy — pleased, contented, satisfied, delighted, elated, joyful, cheerful, ecstatic, jubilant, gay, tickled, gratified, glad, blissful, overjoyed
  49. Hate — despise, loathe, detest, abhor, disfavour, dislike, disapprove, abominate
  50. Have — hold, possess, own, contain, acquire, gain, maintain, believe, bear, beget, occupy, absorb, fill, enjoy
  51. Help — aid, assist, support, encourage, back, wait on, attend, serve, relieve, succour, benefit, befriend, abet
  52. Hide — conceal, cover, mask, cloak, camouflage, screen, shroud, veil
  53. Hurry — rush, run, speed, race, hasten, urge, accelerate, bustle
  54. Hurt — damage, harm, injure, wound, distress, afflict, pain
  55. Idea — thought, concept, conception, notion, understanding, opinion, plan, view, belief
  56. Important — necessary, vital, critical, indispensable, valuable, essential, significant, primary, principal, considerable, famous, distinguished, notable, well-known
  57. Interesting — fascinating, engaging, sharp, keen, bright, intelligent, animated, spirited, attractive, inviting, intriguing, provocative, though-provoking, challenging, inspiring, involving, moving, titillating, tantalizing, exciting, entertaining, piquant, lively, racy, spicy, engrossing, absorbing, consuming, gripping, arresting, enthralling, spellbinding, curious, captivating, enchanting, bewitching, appealing
  58. Keep — hold, retain, withhold, preserve, maintain, sustain, support
  59. Kill — slay, execute, assassinate, murder, destroy, cancel, abolish
  60. Lazy — indolent, slothful, idle, inactive, sluggish
  61. Little — tiny, small, diminutive, shrimp, runt, miniature, puny, exiguous, dinky, cramped, limited, itsy-bitsy, microscopic, slight, petite, minute
  62. Look — gaze, see, glance, watch, survey, study, seek, search for, peek, peep, glimpse, stare, contemplate, examine, gape, ogle, scrutinize, inspect, leer, behold, observe, view, witness, perceive, spy, sight, discover, notice, recognize, peer, eye, gawk, peruse, explore
  63. Love — like, admire, esteem, fancy, care for, cherish, adore, treasure, worship, appreciate, savour
  64. Make — create, originate, invent, beget, form, construct, design, fabricate, manufacture, produce, build, develop, do, effect, execute, compose, perform, accomplish, earn, gain, obtain, acquire, get
  65. Mark — label, tag, price, ticket, impress, effect, trace, imprint, stamp, brand, sign, note, heed, notice, designate
  66. Mischievous — prankish, playful, naughty, roguish, waggish, impish, sportive
  67. Move — plod, go, creep, crawl, inch, poke, drag, toddle, shuffle, trot, dawdle, walk, traipse, mosey, jog, plug, trudge, slump, lumber, trail, lag, run, sprint, trip, bound, hotfoot, high-tail, streak, stride, tear, breeze, whisk, rush, dash, dart, bolt, fling, scamper, scurry, skedaddle, scoot, scuttle, scramble, race, chase, hasten, hurry, hump, gallop, lope, accelerate, stir, budge, travel, wander, roam, journey, trek, ride, spin, slip, glide, slide, slither, coast, flow, sail, saunter, hobble, amble, stagger, paddle, slouch, prance, straggle, meander, perambulate, waddle, wobble, pace, swagger, promenade, lunge
  68. Moody — temperamental, changeable, short-tempered, glum, morose, sullen, modish, irritable, testy, peevish, fretful, spiteful, sulky, touchy
  69. Neat — clean, orderly, tidy, trim, dapper, natty, smart, elegant, well-organized, super, desirable, spruce, shipshape, well-kept, shapely
  70. New — fresh, unique, original, unusual, novel, modern, current, recent
  71. Old — feeble, frail, ancient, weak, aged, used, worn, dilapidated, ragged, faded, broken-down, former, old-fashioned, outmoded, passé, veteran, mature, venerable, primitive, traditional, archaic, conventional, customary, stale, musty, obsolete, extinct
  72. Part — portion, share, piece, allotment, section, fraction, fragment
  73. Place — space, area, spot, plot, region, location, situation, position, residence, dwelling, set, site, station, status, state
  74. Plan — plot, scheme, design, draw, map, diagram, procedure, arrangement, intention, device, contrivance, method, way, blueprint
  75. Popular — well-liked, approved, accepted, favourite, celebrated, common, current
  76. Predicament — quandary, dilemma, pickle, problem, plight, spot, scrape, jam
  77. Put — place, set, attach, establish, assign, keep, save, set aside, effect, achieve, do, build
  78. Quiet — silent, still, soundless, mute, tranquil, peaceful, calm, restful
  79. Right — correct, accurate, factual, true, good, just, honest, upright, lawful, moral, proper, suitable, apt, legal, fair
  80. Run — race, speed, hurry, hasten, sprint, dash, rush, escape, elope, flee
  81. Scared — afraid, frightened, alarmed, terrified, panicked, fearful, unnerved, insecure, timid, shy, skittish, jumpy, disquieted, worried, vexed, troubled, disturbed, horrified, terrorized, shocked, petrified, haunted, timorous, shrinking, tremulous, stupefied, paralyzed, stunned, apprehensive
  82. Show — display, exhibit, present, note, point to, indicate, explain, reveal, prove, demonstrate, expose
  83. Slow — unhurried, gradual, leisurely, late, behind, tedious, slack
  84. Stop — cease, halt, stay, pause, discontinue, conclude, end, finish, quit
  85. Story — tale, myth, legend, fable, yarn, account, narrative, chronicle, epic, sage, anecdote, record, memoir
  86. Strange — odd, peculiar, unusual, unfamiliar, uncommon, queer, weird, outlandish, curious, unique, exclusive, irregular
  87. Take — hold, catch, seize, grasp, win, capture, acquire, pick, choose, select, prefer, remove, steal, lift, rob, engage, bewitch, purchase, buy, retract, recall, assume, occupy, consume
  88. Tell — disclose, reveal, show, expose, uncover, relate, narrate, inform, advise, explain, divulge, declare, command, order, bid, recount, repeat
  89. Think — judge, deem, assume, believe, consider, contemplate, reflect, mediate
  90. Trouble — distress, anguish, anxiety, worry, wretchedness, pain, danger, peril, disaster, grief, misfortune, difficulty, concern, pains, inconvenience, exertion, effort
  91. True — accurate, right, proper, precise, exact, valid, genuine, real, actual, trusty, steady, loyal, dependable, sincere, staunch
  92. Ugly — hideous, frightful, frightening, shocking, horrible, unpleasant, monstrous, terrifying, gross, grisly, ghastly, horrid, unsightly, plain, homely, evil, repulsive, repugnant, gruesome
  93. Unhappy — miserable, uncomfortable, wretched, heart-broken, unfortunate, poor, downhearted, sorrowful, depressed, dejected, melancholy, glum, gloomy, dismal, discouraged, sad
  94. Use — employ, utilize, exhaust, spend, expend, consume, exercise
  95. Wrong — incorrect, inaccurate, mistaken, erroneous, improper, unsuitable

If you still think that you are not able to transfer some of your emotions and thoughts to your friends or family in a perfect way and feel very uncomfortable about that feelings you may take a look:

http://dunyaminsinirlari.tumblr.com/post/127982187867/pratik-kelime-listesi-useful-word-list

That teacher is probably one of the most influential teachers I have ever had. His class was one of THE BEST classes I ever took. These past 3 years knowing him was pretty legit. I remember the first time I met him I was so scared of him but then he spoke to me and I was like wow okay he’s a child. He invited me into this program my school offers and honestly it was the best choice i ever made because that program made me who I am today. There was this one time my junior year I refused to do this essay I hated it and I hands down didn’t want to even attempt it, it was a persuasive essay, I had told him I wasn’t going to even try and it was already late after school and my dad was here, well he said “Fantasic! I want to talk to him let him know and bring him to my class.” at that point I was beyond irritated it was ridiculous. I brought my dad to him and he told my dad the situation and later that night I finished the essay in about 45 minutes no trouble whatsoever. I have so many stories about him and my history teacher it’s ridiculous. Maybe later I’ll post some more :)

okay so story time

my english teacher made the entire class leave quietly while some kid was sleeping in class and he made the next professor coming in the room to make her students to sit in class really quietly and 30 minutes later, my professor is watching this happen, the guy wakes up in the middle of a math lesson

the kid went to english and woke up in math

you do not understand my english professor cut class early to prank a student who fell asleep in class

“I’m an English teacher. It’s been two years since I first came to Korea, but my Korean is still not good”
“How does your perspective differ from other Koreans?”
“Koreans are very kind, but in order to care for others they tend to sacrifice their own wants or needs too much. On the contrary I put myself first. I’m not sure if it’s a cultural difference, but it just seems to me that my friends from hometown don’t care about others the same way Koreans do.”

“전 원어민 영어 강사에요. 한국 온 지 2년 정도 되었는데, 아직 한국말이 서투르죠?”
“어떤 점에서 보통의 한국 사람과 본인의 생각이 많이 다르다고 생각되나요?”
“한국 사람들은 참 친절한데 때론 자기희생적이에요. 그래서 남의 입장에서만 생각하고 너무 많은 배려를 해줘요. 하지만 저는 저를 먼저 생각하고 제가 원하는걸 행동에 옮기죠. 그게 문화 차이가 아닐 수도 있지만, 제가 느끼기엔 제 고향 친구들은 한국 사람들처럼 배려해 주진 않아요.”

TEACHER ADVENTURES: First week of 2015-2016

Well, I survived the first week of the 2015-2016 and I have to admit, I like how I started off the week. How did I start the school year? By dismissing the advice of other teachers and ignored what I have done in previous years: DO NOT START THE YEAR WITH AN ICE BREAKER.

Below are pictures of a newly organized classroom. It felt nice when visiting former students returned to my class and one student said, “Miss, you look a lot more organized this year.”

And I am a lot more organized this year. With taking on one section of teaching Journalism, I need to be just as prepared for my four sections of 9th grade English. So, instead of ice breakers and socialization activities, I went straight to business.

On Monday, I introduced myself, introduced the syllabus, took attendance, and assigned the students their first assignment. Yup. Their first assignment. This was a my way of getting a writing sample from them. I want to assess how the students read questions, respond, and identify their knowledge of punctuation marks.

Section 1: I asked the students 5 simple questions to see if the students can answer the questions in sentences and not in simple word answers.

Section 2: Write a paragraph. I wanted the students to describe an image. This allowed me to assess paragraph writing skills.

Section 3: List 14 punctuation marks used in the grammar of the English language. This question was inspired by this episode of  The West Wing. Of course, most students listed no more than six punctuation marks. If time permitted, I showed them the list.

On Tuesday, I reviewed the classroom rules and expectations, updated new students and provided them the syllabus, and did a dictation activity to help me assess their listening and comprehension skills. We had to listen to this YouTube clip twice, reading the paragraph a total of six times.

They did well as expected, but through their response I can see who really struggled and who did not.

By Wednesday my students participated in what will take place every Wednesday: Sustained Silent Reading (SSR). The students did not have their selected reading books (yet) so I provided the students a magazine and at the end of reading, they did an assignment based on the Modern Language Association (MLA) formatting. 

Thursday we reviewed what will be taught for the next four weeks: Teens and Technology. I bulk ordered Heads Up: Stop. Think. Connect. which will be our first non-fiction reading text we will use in class as I teach students technology responsibility and socializing online.

By Friday I had the students complete their first 100 point assignment: write a 5 paragraph essay on their Literary Autobiography. Basically, tell me about your life experience with reading and writing. A complete essay will help me assess their essay writing skills. They were give 25-30 minutes. I had a few who managed at least a paragraph, whereas I have one student who did not write a single sentence. Upon contacting the Counseling office we discovered that the student might have been misplaced and may need additional resources.

Of course, I can detail each day a bit more, but chances are you are a teacher and you will understand this: It’s Sunday.

Have a good one folks!

Me: “Ugh. Kids these days. THEY DON’T CARE ABOUT ANYONE OR ANYTHING BUT THEMSELVES. RANT, RANT, RANT.” *sulks bitterly*

Students: “Here, Miss. We brought you these, because you’re an English teacher and we know how much you like Cheez-Its.”

Me: *sheepishly eats words…literally AND figuratively*

youtube

My English teacher sings about life, hope, and other wonderful things. I had heard rumors that she could sing but I had no idea it was this good.

Turning “reluctants” into readers

mdmshakespeare replied to your post: Submit your English Major Success Stories!

I teach high school and include zombie apocalypse, Hitchcock, fairy tales, and any novel my heart desires in my curriculum. I’ve been creating readers out of reluctants for 15 years and hear “I can’t put this book you gave me down!” regularly.