english-films

"37 Slogans For College Majors If They Were Actually Honest"

Accounting: selling your soul for money.

Aerospace Engineering: “it actually is rocket science.”

Anthropology: it’ll get you laid, but it won’t get you paid!

Archeology: if you don’t know what it is, it’s probably ceremonial.

Art History: and you thought making art was pointless!

Astrophysics: “Eh, I’m within an order of magnitude…”

Biochemistry: spend 4 years aspiring to discover the cure for cancer, and the rest of your life manufacturing shampoo.

Chemistry: where alcohol is a solution.

Communications: “we’ll teach you everything you need to know about convincing your friends that your degree is actually meaningful.”

Computer Engineering: tons of chicks, just not very many.

Computer Science (for a straight girl): the odds are good, but the goods are odd.

Creative Writing: because job security is for pussies.

Criminal Justice: we’re here because of Law & Order reruns.

Dental Hygienist: “something to do until you get knocked up.”

Engineering: the art of figuring out which parameters you can safely ignore.

English: so you want to be a teacher.

Film: forks on the left, knives on the right.

Finance: “accounting was too hard.”

Graphic Design: no, we’re not artists.  We’re designers; there’s a difference.

History: history may repeat itself, but you definitely will.

Information Technology: let me Google that for you.

Journalism: learn how to construct an argument that no one will listen to.

Latin: because useful is overrated.

Linguistics: studied 17 languages, fluent in none of them.

Marine Biology: “I wanted to play with dolphins, but I’m looking at algae instead.”

Music Performance: if you don’t hate yourself, you’re doing it wrong.

Nursing: learning to save others’ lives while struggling not to take your own.

Philosophy: think about it.

Photography: it’s worth a shot.

Physics: “everything you learned last week was wrong.”

Political Science: your opinion is wrong

Pre-med: “I’ll probably switch majors in two years.”

Psychology: good luck doing anything until you get your Masters.

Speech Pathology: we have a way of making you talk.

Statistics: where everything’s made up, and numbers don’t matter.

Structural Engineering: because architects don’t know what physics is.

Zoology: because you can’t major in kittens.

amysantiagone  asked:

In Rogue One, Cassian Andor states that he's been fighting for the rebels since he was 6 years old. Assuming he meant literal combating, would his personality be similar to that of a child raised for combat? Would there be any differences?

This is sort of a yes and no, as all children involved in violent conflicts from an early age are affected by it. However, the children who take part in rebellions aren’t in the same category of the child soldiers discussed on this blog before, though they absolutely share similarities.

Kids involved in rebellions are rarely used as frontline combatants. They’re far too valuable for that. Instead, they function as informants, carriers, and, occasionally, saboteurs. They’re not the one who picks up the gun to shoot down enemy soldiers in a safe zone. They’re the ones who move the gun past the security perimeter or receive it from the old man or woman who did and plant it. They’re the ones hanging around befriending enemy soldiers in bars or cantinas so they can tip their friends off about where the troops are moving to next. Children, women, the elderly, those generally viewed as non-combatants, the ones that society overlooks or views as “safe” are often the backbone of any resistance movement.

They get the goods, they move the packages, they carry the messages between resistance cells, they sometimes take care of the equipment, and they do most of the footwork that allows a resistance to engage the enemy. When they do fight, it’s generally in the form of sabotage like finding and slipping poison into the enemy troop’s stew, planting bombs, or because survival necessitates it when their cover is blown.

As a child, Cassian Andor would have a background common with other children in rebellions depicted in media like ‘Phan Duc To’ from Good Morning, Vietnam! (1987) and the children involved in The Battle of Algiers (1966).

If you’ve never seen Good Morning, Vietnam! I just spoiled the movie.

The Battle of Algiers is a great movie if you’re looking for an honest overview of how rebellions function on both sides of the conflict or just a treatment on the French colonization of Algeria. Fair warning, it is not an english language film. Kiera Nerys from Star Trek: Deep Space 9 is another decent character to look at when wanting to model a background for a resistance fighter who joined as a child. G’kar from Babylon 5 and the entire Narn/Centauri conflict is also an excellent example of the enduring hatreds and issues brought by colonization.

One of the qualities you see in these children and then again as adults is pure, unadulterated hatred for their oppressors. More so than the other kinds, they hate. Often to the point of becoming a new version of the enemy their resistance was attempting to drive off.

Cassian would’ve spent a lot of time hanging around rebel fighters, doing odd jobs for them until the day came when they were short a man or needed a message run by someone who wouldn’t attract attention.

If this has started to sound like spycraft, well, you’re not far off. Resistances don’t have the luxury of major battle offensives like an army, and even guerilla warfare is actually a step up from what happens on the ground, and there is a common word you’ll find familiar for what they do: terrorism.

The actions of a resistance fighter and the actions of a terrorist are one and the same, the only difference is in who is telling the story. If you want to investigate real resistances without the judgements, study up on World War II, the French Resistance, and the Maquis.

Yes, that Maquis not the one from Star Trek.

On the ground resistances are rough and ready, they’re often split apart into distinct cells comprised of only a few agents, and almost no one knows who is higher up the food chain. This is important because it protects the other operating cells and resistance leadership in case an operative is captured by the enemy.

For the most part, whether you’re writing historical fiction or a foray into science fiction, the philosophy, goals, and strategy of a resistance will remain the same. What changes is how they go about operating within their setting because, like spies, a resistance requires the author have a solid grasp on how the enemy functions, the details in how they hold power, the technology they have access to, and how their army works.

On a literal and literary level, the Resistance is about disruption. Whether they’re sabotaging train tracks, blowing up food transports, or bombing nightclubs, their goal is to disrupt everyday life and make it as unpleasant as possible. They’re ghosts in the system, you’ll never know where or when they’ll strike, and they’re out to destroy enemy moral every way they can. A resistance drives the enemy from their homeland by making the cost of holding it no longer worthwhile. Though, historically, this is often impossible unless the majority of the population joins the cause and/or the tide of public sentiment back home within the enemy’s homeworld or nation turns against the invaders. A resistance occurring against the powerful within their own homeland is much, much more destructive.

What marks a character like Cassian, who grew up in a resistance movement, more than other children engaged in violence is first and foremost betrayal. Betrayal from without, betrayal from within, the people he’s lied to and betrayed, seeing many friends vanish overnight or die, and never quite knowing who he can trust. He probably has very few friends left alive from his early days with the Rebellion, and more than likely experienced the Imperials wiping out his cell(s) on multiple occasions. He worked his way up the ranks until he became an operative working closely within the Rebellion’s inner circle.

Star Wars is functionally much more clear cut than the real resistances that occur throughout the world.

Happy writing!

-Michi

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Disney Songs in German

Disney songs from some popular Disney films dubbed in german! Music is a brilliant way to immerse yourself in your target language, and what better way than the Disney way? Many of these songs are from our childhoods, so it’s some nice nostalgic immersion. 

*The english titles next to the german is not necessarily a translation, but rather the english title. Also the year next to the title of the film is the year that the initial english film was released, not necessarily when it was released or dubbed in german.

Some notes: I apologize if your favourite Disney film or song didn’t make the list, I definitely didn’t get all of them. Maybe a part 2 is in order? Also, I tried my best to find videos that had subtitles and a translation, but unfortunately not all of them have it. You can always do a quick google search if you want the lyrics and/or english translation. Be sure to check the descriptions as well, some of them have the lyrics in there. Some videos are better or worse quality than others, but they’re all generally listenable.

I’d also like to give a huge thanks and credit to the creators who translated and subtitled these videos! They did all the work, afterall.

Enjoy!

Mulan (1998)

Pocahontas (1995)

Dornröschen [Sleeping Beauty] (1959)

Tarzan (1999)

Cinderella (1950) 

Note: While the german name for ‘Cinderella’ is ‘Aschenputtel’, she goes by Cinderella in the german-dubbed Disney version. Aschenputtel is also an alternative title to the film.

Aristocats (1970)

Schneewittchen und die sieben Zwerge [Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs] (1937)

Note: Disney’s Snow White has been re-dubbed a couple times in german for some reason, so the particular year a song is from may differ from another. They’re all from the same movie though.

Arielle, die Meerjungfrau [The Little Mermaid] (1989)

Note: Same situation as Snow White.

Aladdin (1992)

Der König der Löwen [The Lion King] (1994)

Der König der Löwen 2 – Simbas Königreich [The Lion King II: Simba’s Pride] (1998)  

Küss den Frosch [The Princess and the Frog] (2009)

Rapunzel – Neu Verföhnt [Tangled] (2010)

Die Eiskönigin – Völlig Unverfroren [Frozen] (2013)

Das Dschungelbuch [The Jungle Book] (1967)

Alice im Wunderland [Alice in Wonderland] (1951)

Hercules (1997)


My other Disney compilations: French Arabic  

just an FYI to fellow sensies:

the phrasing that a cast member “did not want to return” to sense8 is really awful wording. Their contracts lapsed and one of the number one rules of television is you don’t let that happen with your main cast!! Contracts are a HUGE deal for TV shows. The vast majority of actors live from gig to gig. Unless you’re an A-lister, there is no such thing as job security. If you’re not under contract, and it is very uncertain whether a show will continue–your average actor is not a bad person for taking on another project. Especially since some of the Sense8 cast don’t primarily work in the english language film/tv industry, which is where most of the job opportunities are. Also, in Max Riemelt’s case, he has a kid to support.

Sense8 ending is completely on Netflix. They let the contracts lapse because they wanted to cut off the show. 

I recommend that everyone go on twitter and make a lot of noise about Sense8 for Emmy nomination. Because it deserves that recognition.

anonymous asked:

Do you feel even a tiny bit of pity for maven?

Do I feel pity for Maven? Maybe. I suppose I pity the fact that he did not get to live the life he wanted to live, and that his life was technically stolen from him before he even knew what it was. The sad thing, at least in my opinion, is that the minute Elara was pregnant, she had already sealed Maven’s fate. Maven was going to take the crown with her, whether he wanted to or not. He’s almost a representation of what happens when a parent literally forces their child to be something. It’s not so much a pitying thing, as it is tragic. Maven is, in a way, a tragedy, and that is amazing. I feel as if I’ve seen very few villains in my time  that are so very tragic. Sure you have the odds or end one that appears once every blue moon, but Maven is almost a work of art, a story inside of a story. He’s the last act of a Shakespearean tragedy. He’s Hamlet begging Horatio to remain alive and tell the story of what happened in Denmark, he’s Juliet running the knife through her chest because she woke up just a little bit too late, he’s Othello realizing his mistake too late, he’s the guard arriving a second after Cordelia was hung to announce that she was innocent. He’s a tragedy that we only see the ending of and the never beginning. In a way, I don’t pity that, I marvel at it. It’s so beautifully crafted, and you don’t pity a beautiful work of art. You admire it, and praise it. I’ve never praised Maven’s actions, but I do praise his character and what it represents. In my eyes, Maven is a flawless villain, and I love him to death for it. He’s exactly what Red Queen needed for a villain. You have heroes who are not always a heroes, and a villain who you care about because he is so fantastically created. I would not say that I pity Maven, I’ve never really pitied a character, but I will say that I adore him as a villain and admire him as character. 

Toshiro Mifune as Kikuchiyo in Seven Samurai (1954).  Toshiro was born in China to Japanese parents.  Although he is the most well known Japanese actor throughout the world, he was 21 when he first visited Japan.  He had 182 acting credits in his career, dating back to 1947, through 1995.  He made 16 films with director Akira Kurosawa, beginning with Drunken Angel, through Red Beard (1965) when they had a falling out and stopped working together.  Toshiro only rarely appeared in English language films, most notably the auto racing spectacle Grand Prix, and the American tv mini-series Shogun,  His other films among the best 1,001 are Drunken Angel, Stray Dog, Rashomon, and Throne of Blood, all with Kurosawa.

youtube.com
Your Name. -- Official English Dub Trailer
The official trailer for Makoto Shinkai's hit film Your Name. Coming to theaters in 2017 both English dubbed and subbed! Go to funimationfilms.com/yourname t...

It’s time! Tickets are now on sale for Makoto Shinkai’s Your Name. which hits select North American theaters, April 7th! 


Head over to the FunimationFilms site to find your nearest theater and buy tickets!

anonymous asked:

Hey! What are your thoughts on the new Great Wall movie starring Matt Damon?

I find it a bit of an interesting case because I’m all for supporting an International film, Asian director, and a film with a large Asian cast BUT at the end of the day it’s just another movie that perpetuates the WHITE SAVIOR trope which we all know, hate, and are tired of.

Matt Damon seems oblivious to why his role in the film is controversial but at least he stated that he is willing to listen and is open to understanding why it’s being perceived that way. He’s not denying it like Scarlett Johansson who claims that she would never take a role from a PoC yet does it for ~feminism~

This film is director Zhang Yimou (who stands by his film), this is his first American/English speaking film. I believe that in order to appeal to the Western and Asian market, it was believed that if they cast 3 Western actors in the film (Matt Damon, Pedro Pascal, and Willem Defoe), it would appeal to the Western audience. His interview with Entertainment Weekly makes it clear that he knew that if he was gonna make a Hollywood movie… he was gonna have to make a Hollywood movie… 

“First and foremost, this is an English-language film, and a Hollywood blockbuster. It was already very clear in the script phase. This is a Hollywood monster movie and needs to be made in that style. I don’t want to change that approach, and there’s no need to do that. What I really want is to bring Chinese color and cultural background to the worldwide audience through a film language that they are familiar with.”

So I get it. I get why Matt Damon stars in this film. I don’t understand why he has to play the lead though. Wouldn’t it make sense if he played a secondary character? The other two Western actors in the film play secondary roles in the film. I don’t think Matt Damon’s role should be the lead. Why does the white man have to save China? He’s only the lead because… you know it… I know it… Hollywood is racist. Even though the cast is predominately Asian, do you really think it would’ve gotten made without Matt Damon starring in it? No. 

But it is dope that Zhang Yimou wanted to make a film he believed was authentic to Chinese culture and he gave Asian actors an opportunity to work in the Western market but the problem is that ultimately, he sold out in doing so. 

Also while I’m at it, I’m just gonna rant about how racist the American marketing of this film is! This is the US poster for the film!!! How embarrassing??? Who thought this was a good idea??? Just Matt Damon??? And then it spits a few facts about The Great Wall of China… smh…

It’s like The Sapphires movie poster controversy but they don’t even show a single PoC on the American promo art I’ve seen for this film!!!!

Now look at the Chinese marketing for this film! Even the Western actors got their own individual character posters (not pictured but they did!!!). The American market does not value the Asian actors in the film because they’re “unknown” in America. It’s insulting because these are International stars too! Just because they’re not white or on Game of Thrones doesn’t mean they don’t have name recognition. I mean the film stars Lu Han, a C-Pop/K-Pop star who was apart of one of the biggest boy bands in the world! Andy Lau has made a name for himself in the Chinese film industry and where is his top billing on the American poster?! The American market FAILED to showcase these actors in their promo art and reduce them to unimportant characters regardless of how big or small their roles are in their OWN trailer which is absolutely disappointing. 

so i’m doing a subtitled translation of romeo and juliet into contemporary english using the zeffirelli film version and i came to romeo’s ‘‘beauty too rich for use, for earth too dear!’’ line, which i’ve always loved 

and then i realized that it’s pretty much the shakespearean equivalent of ‘‘beautiful cinnamon roll too good for this world, too pure’’ 

Ida Lupino (4 February 1918 – 3 August 1995) was an English-American film actress and director, and a pioneer among women filmmakers. In her forty-eight-year career, she appeared in fifty-nine films and directed seven others. She co-wrote and co-produced some of her own films as well. She appeared in serial television programmes fifty-eight times and directed fifty other episodes. Additionally, she contributed as a writer to five films and four TV episodes. She and her husband Collier Young formed an independent company, The Filmakers, and Lupino became a producer, director and screenwriter of low-budget, issue-oriented films.

In an article for the Village Voice, Carrie Rickey wrote that Lupino was a model of modern feminist filmmaking: “Not only did Lupino take control of production, direction and screenplay, but each of her movies addresses the brutal repercussions of sexuality, independence and dependence.”

After four “woman’s” films about social issues – including Outrage (1950), a film about rape – Lupino directed her first hard-paced, fast-moving film, The Hitch-Hiker (1953), making her the first woman to direct a film noir. Writer Richard Koszarski noted: “Her films display the obsessions and consistencies of a true auteur…. In her films The Bigamist and The Hitch-Hiker Lupino was able to reduce the male to the same sort of dangerous, irrational force that women represented in most male-directed examples of Hollywood film noir.” x

JULIE ANDREWS

Dame Julie Elizabeth Andrews, is an English film and stage actress, and an operatic singer, who was born in Surrey, England. She was the original singer for the stage musicals of The King and I, My Fair Lady, and Mary Poppins.

In 1957 she became the 1st person to play Cinderella on-screen. She made her feature film debut in Mary Poppins (1964), for which she won the Academy Award for Best Actress. She later married Hollywood writer Blake Edwards.

She had the lead role in the blockbuster film The Sound of Music, an when Adjusted for inflation, this is the third-highest grossing film of all time. 

She acted in other big films an was directed by Alfred Hitchcock, making her the most successful film star in the world in the 1960s. In 2000, she was made a Dame by Queen Elizabeth II for services to the performing arts. 

In the 21st century her film career still continued, with the successes of The Princess Diaries and its sequel, plus the animated-films of Shrek (2004–2010), and Despicable Me (2010), for which she provided her ladylike voice.

In addition to her Oscar Award, she has won 5 Golden Globes, 3 Grammys, 2 Emmys, and a great many other awards that are too many to list here !