english legend

Also I overheard the person at the register talk about how Turf Wars has practically been selling out at all the comic retailers.

Dark Horse and the distributors severely underestimated the demand, and as a result, there aren’t enough books to meet all of the demand for them.

So the book has now sold out of the first print, and is on the second printing now.

And you know what that means? It’s a very good thing, because it means the book is selling really, really well.

And that is just a great thing, especially since the book features a bisexual romance.

So I’m proud of the Korra and more specifically, the Korrasami fandom for making this an all around success.

Of all the female characters in the Arthurian legend, Morgana is the most powerful, even more so than Merlin. Merlin may be a powerful prophet, Morgana is the practitioner. Merlin sees what can go wrong, Morgana accomplishes it. Morgana considers Merlin a somewhat tiresome old man, and it is fitting that it is her derivative character, Nimue, who finally divests Merlin of his power and confines him to his crystal cave.

Morgana must still be smiling through the mists.
—  Sara Douglass, “The Betrayal of Arthur”
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Translation for all you English speakers~

Permission was granted for reproduction by the original artist. Editing and redistribution without permission is forbidden.

This picture is after the battle with Zant in the twilight realm. I want from the bottom of my heart for Link and Midna to say things like this as true companions. By Midna’s side the whole way, Link grew from a young man from the countryside to a hero of light, and from there I dream of him becoming Midna’s partner and prince (though he would be a rugged prince…)

I think Link was the one who lifted the curse on Midna’s heart.

Translation by yours truly

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I can’t get over this 😂😂😂

youtube

EVERYBODY STOP WHAT YOU’RE DOING AND WATCH THIS.

This is one of the short films made as part of the Legendy Polskie cycle (”Polish Legends”). Directed and designed by a CGI artist acclaimed worldwide, Tomasz Bagiński, the cycle aims to present Polish folklore in a new manner, and to prove that fantasy films can be done well (or better!) outside of Hollywood.

The goal is to combine modern, world-class filmmaking with… some of the more typical aspects of Polish-ness, not only where legends are concerned.

This installment in the series does not require knowing any particular legend, the English subs are passable (though it’s less funny, some of this stuff is not very translate-able), so it’s pretty accessible to general public.

Also, really cool.

For explanations of some things that may perplex foreigners, see below.

Keep reading

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Przeraża mnie ta chwila,
która jej wolność skradła. 
Jaskółka - czarny brylant,
wrzucony tu przez diabła.
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
[Jaga - Polish Legends by Platige Image]
[official song cover]

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David Bowie and Dana Gillespie photographed by Michael Stroud on May 17, 1971.  

Gillespie performed backing vocals for the song ‘It Ain’t Easy’, from Bowie’s album 'The Rise and Fall of Ziggy Stardust and the Spiders from Mars’. She was also a British water skiing champion. Both singers were managed by Tony DeFries’s Mainman management company.

Mythological Throwback Thursday: Bad Dogs of the British Isles

Hello! Are you a dog person? We used to be, until we found out about all the terrifying mutts stalking the British Isles. We’re expecting Alex’s family back in Staffordshire to be devoured by supernatural hounds any day now. Arm yourself with the knowledge to protect your loved ones this Mythological Throwback Thursday!

One of the most notorious is Black Shuck, a ghostly black dog that stalks the wilds of East Anglia. It’s thought its name derives from the Saxon word for demon, ‘scucca’. Others believe it to be a version of the Viking Shukir, the war-dog of Thor and Odin. Black Shuck is a large hound, variously described as the size of a calf or even a horse. It has baleful red eyes (or just one large one in the centre of its head, in some tellings) and can coalesce out of mist on dark nights, to frighten lone travellers. Those who see Black Shuck usually live long enough to tell the tale, but many believed that those who see it are marked for death, and will pass away within the year.

Similar is the tale of the Barghest, a spectral beast that haunted the north of England, and was particularly infamous in Yorkshire. Described to principally take the form of a black dog with fiery eyes, it was said to be able to become invisible, to shapeshift (favouring the form of a headless person) and to have dominion over other dogs. Upon the death of any notable person in the community the Barghest would form the head of a funeral procession of sorts, followed by all the other dogs of the community, leading them in howling and baying. If you were fleeing the Barghest it was considered wise to cross a stream or river, since the superstition was that it was unable to.

On the Isle of Man, a ghost called Moddey Dhoo, which literally means ‘black dog’, haunted Peel Castle. Though it seemed relatively benign, wandering through the hallways of the castle, invariably settling by the fireplace of the guard chamber, it was frightening to those unused to its spooky demeanour. It would never appear during the day, returning always to a passageway that led to the guard captain’s chamber and disappearing. One night a drunken guard defied Moddey Dhoo. On entering the haunted passageway, dreadful sounds were heard. The guard, scared witless, returned to his comrades aghast and died within three days.

The Welsh passed down the tale of the Cŵn Annwn. Not ghosts but denizens of the supernatural realm of Annwn, these hounds were hunting dogs for the king of the realm, Arawn. Unlike the other examples, these dogs were pure white with red ears. During the Wild Hunt, the Cŵn Annwn would run down wrongdoers for their crimes. It is speculated that they accompanied King Arthur’s cousin Culwhch to Arthur’s court.

Of course, the good people of the UK and Ireland could not help but include their hellhound-riddled folklore in their literature. Charlotte Brontë’s Jane Eyre includes an encounter which the titular heroine initially mistakes for a Gytrash, a being similar to a Barghest. J.K Rowling includes the legend of the Grim in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban, with characteristics identical to those of Black Shuck. And of course we couldn’t go without mentioning the infamous Hound of the Baskervilles by Arthur Conan Doyle.

Why dogs? Possibly we humans share an inherent, instinctual aversion to wolves, and when like in the British Isles wolves become extinct through our actions, we create our own. Monsters from the id! Or maybe it’s because we’re just really into dogs, and there’s nothing so terrible as being betrayed by something you love. Join us for another Mythological Throwback Thursday next week!