england-in-history

psa for non-Americans and non-New England Americans

you know the Salem witch trials? that thing where nobody got burned and nobody was an actual witch but it was still a big deal because 19 innocent people were executed?

well the place we call Salem now was not where that happened. that place used to be called Salem Town. the trials happened in what was then called Salem Village (also sometimes “the farms”). it was an agrarian community with stronger Puritan values that sometimes clashed with the more worldly trading center Salem Town

after the trials Salem Village was so ashamed that it changed its name to Danvers and went on to experience a bunch more dark and tragic stuff. Salem Town said “sweet, tourism!” and jumped on the witch bandwagon and is now a center of pretty nice magic shops, pretty tacky tourist attractions, and pretty pretty historical dance events

Danvers has a laser tag place and they used to have a Denny’s but it closed

the end

The oldest door in Britain in Westminster Abbey - a 900-year-old door was put in place in the 1050s, during the reign of the Abbey’s founder, Edward the Confessor. The door, which measures 6.5ft by 4ft, was made from one tree which probably grew between AD 924 and 1030. Simon Thurley, of English Heritage, said: “It is incredible to think that when the door was made the Norman Conquest had not yet happened and William of Normandy was still a young man of about 20.”

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Lesbian History:

Marguerite Radclyffe Hall (1880 - 1943) - author

  • was an open lesbian all her life, and had a knack for pursuing married women, tsk tsk
  • self-described ‘congenital invert’, or ‘butch’ in today’s language
  • her novel The Well of Loneliness was explicitly lesbian in theme, though not sexually. Due to the obvious lesbian nature her book fell under obscenity trials in England and was banned.

The last known instance of residents of Rhode Island exhuming a body to perform a bizarre ritual in an attempt to kill a vampire took place in 1892. Tuberculosis struck the family of George and Mary Brown from Exeter, Rhode Island. It was believed that this was caused by the undead so they, along with the townsfolk, decided to exhume the bodies of two family members who had already died from the disease. These family members showed regular decomposition and were then re-buried. Next, they exhumed the body of their 19-year-old daughter, Mercy; she showed absolutely no signs of decomposition. The family took this as a sign that Mercy was undead and that she was a vampire. They removed her heart, burnt it, and then mixed the ashes with water for her brother, Edwin, who was sick, to drink. It was believed that if the sick victim were to consume the heart of a vampire then they would be cured. Unsurprisingly, Edwin died two months later. Mercy’s grave stands in Chestnutt Hill Cemetery.