engineering fundamentals

It is important to view knowledge as sort of a semantic tree - make sure you understand the fundamental principles, ie the trunk and big branches, before you get into the leaves/details. Otherwise there is nothing for them to hang on to.
—  Elon Musk
Brain to robot: 'Move, please'

Using the power of thought to control a robot that helps to move a paralysed hand: a project from the ETH Rehabilitation Engineering Laboratory could fundamentally change the therapy and daily lives of stroke patients.

One in six people will suffer a stroke in their lifetime. In Switzerland alone, stroke affects 16,000 people every year. Two thirds of those affected suffer from paralysis of the arm. Intensive training can – depending on the extent of damage to the brain – help patients regain a certain degree of control over their arms and hands. This may take the form of classic physio- and occupational therapy, or it may also involve robots.

Roger Gassert, Professor of Rehabilitation Engineering at ETH Zurich, has developed a number of robotic devices that train hand functions and sees this as a good way to support patient therapy. However, both physio- and robot-assisted therapy are usually limited to one or two training sessions a day; and for patients, travelling to and from therapy can also be time consuming.

Keep reading

An example of Lenz's Law

An example of Lenz’s Law

Video’s like these; apart from being extremely satisfying to watch, are a perfect representation of one of the most fundamental laws to almost all motors and machinery, Lenz’s Law.

Lenz’s law states that: “An induced electromotive force (emf) always gives rise to a current whose magnetic field opposes the original change in magnetic flux”.

Confusing on the surface, but remembering that:

Keep reading