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Pages 98 to 106 of Engineering Volume 2
August 10th 1866


Headings
PORTER’S GOVERNORS
THE ATLANTIC CABLE
THE CORLISS ENGINE
LONDON WATER FROM THE LAKES
SUBMARINE TUNNEL BETWEEN ENGLAND AND FRANCE
A RAILWAY SOLD AT AUCTION
MESSRS. RENNIES’ GUNBOATS
DEAKIN AND JOHNSON’S MANUFACTURE OF GUN BARRELS
THOMPSON’S PATENT MANUFACTURE OF FIREARMS AND ORDNANCE
RECENT PATENTS
GRAVING DOCKS
AMERICAN RAILWAYS
BLAST FURNACES, NORTON IRONWORKS
ORDNANCE WITH DIFFERENTIAL PRESSURE BETWEEN CONCENTRIC TUBES
THE PENTAGONAL NETWORK
THE ATLANTIC TELEGRAPH
TELEGRAPHS AND THE SNOW
THE ELECTRIC AND INTERNATIONAL TELEGRAPH COMPANY
THE ROYAL SCHOOL OF NAVAL ARCHITECTURE
LONDON WATER
THE PAPER TRADE AND CHOLERA
THE WORKS AT CHATHAM
THE INDIAN MILLS
RIO DE JANEIRO
BRITISH NORTH AMERICAN TRADE
BELGIAN IRON
THE PATENT COMISSIONERS’ REPORT
NOTES ON STEAM VESSELS
CARDIFF
THE CARNFORTH WORKS
STANDING ORDERS
THE RIVER LEA


Licensed under the GNU Free Documentation Licence. Sourced from
http://www.gracesguide.co.uk/

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Vertical City by Luca Curci Architects in Middle East

Luca Curci architects in Italy has finally revealed their design into Vertical City. The Vertical City is built in the water and protruded out of its surface. It promotes sustainability and aims to solve the problem with population density. The structure has a re-interpreted open structure where each level of the skyscraper is covered with green elements- and so allow light and air ventilation. Such a design opens up with healthier and greener lifestyle to the residents in the building and a more integrated connection with natural elements. 

The building’s structure is based on a modular structural prefabricated element, which is repeated horizontally and vertically. As evident in the image, the singular geometric shape of the structural element forms the network of the each floor. The structure is surrounded by a membrane of photovoltaic glasses which provide electricity to the whole building and make it energy-independent. 

Social areas and community life is cultivated with proliferated green areas. It consists of 10 modular layers overlapping and towers up to 750 meters with a total volume of 3750k cubic meters. Its capacity is up to 25k population with a green area over 200k square meters. 

The building is settled on the sea bottom, with a series of underwater floors that host parking and technical areas, facilities such as spas, meditation centres and gym with luxury hotels rooms providing underwater views. People are able to reach the Vertical City through water, land or by air: as the building has a semi-submerged bridge, external internal docks and three naval entries at the circular basement. 

(source) 

More Than You Ever Wanted to Know About Math: Integrals

Integration is just the opposite of differentiation. Where a derivative tells you how fast a quantity is changing in a particular instant, an integral tells you how much that quantity has changed overall all in a particular span of time. Basically, it’s nothing more than a summation. If you have a derivative, you can integrate it to get the original function - you’re adding up all those little instantaneous changes to see the overall picture. Like wise, you can go the other way.

Keep reading

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A new gel helps wounds heal

Researchers from UCLA have developed an injectable hydrogel that helps skin wounds heal faster. 

The new synthetic polymer material creates an instant scaffold, sort of like stacked gumballs, that allows new tissue to latch on and grow within the cavities formed between linked spheres of gel.

Conventionally, ointments and other hydrogel dressings have been used to fill in wounds to keep the areas moist and accelerate healing. But none of the materials used now provide a scaffold to allow new tissue to grow while the dressing itself degrades. As a result, the new tissue growth is relatively slow and fragile.

So bringing about an injectable biomaterial that promotes rapid regeneration of tissue has been a “holy grail” in the field of tissue engineering, said co-principal investigator Dino Di Carlo.

They envision the material being useful for a wide variety of wound application, including lacerations to large-area burns.

UC Berkeley researchers have also been developing new approaches to tissue engineering. Last March, their advancement in “herding cells” marked a new direction for smart bandages.

Learn more about how this new gel works

Owls have a lot going for them: good looks, great eyesight, and the power of nearly silent flight

That last characteristic got engineers thinking, what if it were possible to impart Mother Nature’s design for silent owl wings into things like wind turbines, allowing them to quietly operate at higher speeds and generate megawatts of additional power?

Researchers at the University of Cambridge say they’ve taken some good steps toward doing just that, announcing this week their design for a new coating material that mimics the complex structure of an owl’s wing.

“No other bird has this sort of intricate wing structure,” said lead researcher Nigel Peake, in a news release. “Much of the noise caused by a wing - whether it’s attached to a bird, a plane or a fan - originates at the trailing edge where the air passing over the wing surface is turbulent. The structure of an owl’s wing serves to reduce noise by smoothing the passage of air as it passes over the wing - scattering the sound so their prey can’t hear them coming.”

To replicate the trailing-edge structure scientists looked a variety of designs, including covering wind turbines with a material that’s similar to that used in wedding veils. They also created a 3-D printed plastic material which, in tests, reduced noise generated by turbine blades by 10 decibels. 

The findings were presented at the 21st American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) Aeroacoustics Conference in Dallas.

(Image Credit: Wikimedia Commons)

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Interning at NASA is awesome!! …so I had to make some gifs

So the top gif is me sitting in front of NASA’s thermal testing chamber. At this time the chamber was heating up so I had a 45 min break before taking data again. We were testing HD video cameras that will be on the outside of the space station in a few months. They will mostly help with navigation and systems checking.

The second and last images are in front of one of NASA’s 360 degree virtual reality chambers. I’ll post more about these in the future, they are super cool and deserve a post all to their own. The third image is me programming in a good old Linux terminal.

…And the fourth image is me basking in the glory of an Saturn V rocket. This is the rocket that took us to the moon! If any of you ever get the opportunity to see one I highly recommend it.

So if you guys want to keep up with my NASA intern adventures I post about it about twice a week, check out astronomicalwonders.tumblr.com, and you can follow my adventures on twitter @astro_wonders if you so choose. also check out ourtech she’s the one in the last pic!

Cellulose from wood can be printed in 3D

Researchers at Chalmers University of Technology have managed to print and dry three-dimensional objects made entirely by cellulose for the first time with the help of a 3D-bioprinter. They also added carbon nanotubes to create electrically conductive material.

The effect is that cellulose and other raw material based on wood will be able to compete with fossil-based plastics and metals in the on-going additive manufacturing revolution, which started with the introduction of the 3D-printer. 

Read more    

Joseph Strauss, the lead structural engineer who headed the building of the Golden Gate Bridge insisted on a safety net being put up to ensure workers’ safety, despite its $130,000 cost touted as being exorbitant. In the four years that it took to erect the bridge, the net saved the lives of 19 men, who called themselves the “Halfway to Hell Club”.