enes coat

Definite singular form // Norwegian grammar

How a word ends in the definite singular form or ‘bestemt form entall’ in Norwegian, is completely based off of which article is put in front of the noun in the indefinite singular form. En, ei or et.


En: If the noun has the article en in front of it in the indefinite singular form, then the definite singular form will end with -en. If the noun already ends with an -e then only the -n will be added to the end.

Example:
en gutt (a boy)  - gutten (the boy)
en kåpe (a coat - kåpen (the coat)
en sofa (a sofa) - sofaen (the sofa)


Ei: If the noun has the article ei in front of it in the indefinite singular form, the the definite singular form will end with -a. If the noun ends with a vowel that vowel will be changed to -a instead.

Example:
ei jente (a girl) - jenta (the girl)
*ei trapp (a staircase) - trappa (the staircase)
ei veske (a purse) - veska (the purse)

*Keep in mind that a lot of nouns can use both en and ei in front of them and can therefore also be conjugated both ways. This is because of the different dialects in Norway. Personally I will use the conjugation for ei more than I will do for en because of where I’m from. For example, “ei trapp” that I used previously can also be conjugated like “en trapp”

Like this: en trapp (a staircase) - trappen (the staircase)


Et: If the noun has the article et in front of it in the indefinite singular form, the the definite singular form will end with -et.

Example:
et hus (a house) - huset (the house)
et vindu (a window) - vinduet (the window)
*et tre (a tree) - treet (the tree)

*In this example you can see that even though ‘et tre’ ends with an -e, -et is still added to the end, and not just -t. This is not always the case.
Like here:
et sete (a seat) - setet (the seat)

Unfortunately, there is no rule for when this happens, and you’re just gonna have to learn which words uses this as you go.


The definite article for en and ei is ‘den’, while for et it is ‘det’,but ‘den’ or ‘det’ can also mean ‘that’, if you put them directly in front of the noun.

For example:
Den gutten spiller fotball - That boy plays football

If you just want to say “The boy plays football” you’ll skip the ‘den’.
Gutten spiller fotball - The boy plays football.

However, if you put an adjective between the article and the noun it will also be ‘the’ instead of ‘that.

For example:
Den høye gutten spiller fotball - The tall boy plays football

Le petit déjeuner

J'étais déjà assise quand il est entré dans la cuisine. Il m'a tourné le dos, mis du café dans une tasse et la bu d'un trait. Sans me parler, il alluma une cigarette. Il a tapoté les cendres dans le cendrier face à moi avant de l'écraser. Sans me parler, sans me regarder, il s'est levé, il a mis son manteau de cuir et… Il est parti. Sans une parole, sans me regarder. Et moi j'ai pris ma tête dans mes mains et j'ai pleuré.

Originally posted by wherethecontrailsgo

anonymous asked:

Hi there, I just have a simple question. If I were to say 'The brown chair' would I say 'Den brun stol'? Is that considered correct or is there a better/more correct way to say it? Any help would be appreciated :))

‘Den brune stolen’ would be more correct. When it comes to the colours, you add an -e to the end when you’re describing something, unless the colour ends with a vocal.
And whenever you add ‘the’ in front of a noun it will either change the ending to add -en, add or change the vocal to -a, or add -et.

I’m gonna try and give you a bit of an overview of the definite singular forms in Norwegian:


How a word ends in the definite singular form in Norwegian, is completely based off of which article is put in front of the noun in the indefinite singular form. En, ei or et.

En: If the noun has the article en in front of it in the indefinite singular form, then the definite singular form will end with -en. If the noun already ends with an -e then only the -n will be added to the end. 

Example:
en gutt (a boy)  - gutten (the boy)
en kåpe (a coat - kåpen (the coat)
en sofa (a sofa) - sofaen (the sofa)


Ei: If the noun has the article ei in front of it in the indefinite singular form, the the definite singular form will end with -a. If the noun ends with a vocal that vocal will be changed to -a instead. 

Example:
ei jente (a girl) - jenta (the girl)
*ei trapp (a staircase) - trappa (the staircase)
ei veske (a purse) - veska (the purse)

*Keep in mind that a lot of nouns can use both en and ei in front of them and can therefore also be conjugated both ways. This is because of the different dialects in Norway. Personally I will use the conjugation for ei more than I will do for en because of where I’m from. For example, “ei trapp” that I used previously can also be conjugated like “en trapp”

Like this: en trapp (a staircase) - trappen (the staircase)


Et: If the noun has the article et in front of it in the indefinite singular form, the the definite singular form will end with -et.

Example:
et hus (a house) - huset (the house)
et vindu (a window) - vinduet (the window)
*et tre (a tree) - treet (the tree)

*In this example you can see that even though ‘et tre’ ends with an -e, -et is still added to the end, and not just -t. This is not always the case.
Like here:
et sete (a seat) - setet (the seat)

Unfortunately, there is no rule for when this happens, and you’re just gonna have to learn which words uses this as you go. 


The definite article for en and ei is ‘den’, while for et it is ‘det’, but ‘den’ or ‘det’ can also mean ‘that’, if you put them directly in front of the noun.

For example:
Den gutten spiller fotball - That boy plays football

If you just want to say “The boy plays football” you’ll skip the ‘den’.
Gutten spiller fotball - The boy plays football.

However, if you put an adjective between the article and the noun it will also be ‘the’ instead of ‘that.

For example:
Den høye gutten spiller fotball - The tall boy plays football


I hope this helped! I’m gonna add this as an actual post as well, not just an answer to a question!

Winter Clothes in Norwegian

In light of the winter season, here are just some winter clothing items in Norwegian!

Votter: mittens

Hansker: gloves

Støvler: boots

et Skjerf: scarf

en Genser: sweater

ei Lue: beanie

en Frakk: (men’s) coat

en Kåpe: (women’s) coat

In Norwegian, they make a differentiation between a man’s dress coat and a woman’s dress coat, as you can see above. However, the word for “jacket” which is: ei jakke is the same for either gender, and the same with ei dunjakke which is a down coat. 

Here are some extra words!

Støvletter: Boots with heels on them, the kind that women would wear.

et Pannebånd: a knitted headband

Ørevarmere: earmuffs 

Sko: shoes

ei Bukse: pants or jeans

et Skjørt: skirt

en Bluse: blouse

ei Skjorte: shirt 

et Sjal: shawl 

Benedict Cumberbatch stond 20 maart in de Trouw!

De 37-jarige acteur met het rossige haar en de prachtige bariton heeft het publiek aan zijn lippen hangen, kuslippen zijn het, boven amandelvormige ogen. 
(…)
Maar de ‘Byronic looks’ en 'tweed coat’ vormen natuurlijk nog maar de helft van het verhaal. Het gaat ook om zijn optreden in de publieke arena als een geestige gentleman.

(met dank aan Noor voor de foto)