enemy ace

the-young-tiger  asked:

Since you're talking 'bout lions, what can you tell me about Tategami Lioh? I haven't seen Go Busters but the name itself just draws my attention so much.

LT-06 Tategami Lioh is a late addition to the Go-Busters arsenal of Megazords (and yes in Tokumei Sentai Go-Busters the giant robots are referred to as Megazords). It is also a sentient robot known as a Buddyzord, sort of a cross between the human-sized Buddyroids that are partnered with each of the Go-Busters themselves and the giant sized robots they fight with.  As such, it has three distinct modes it can assume:

The first is its Buddy Animal mode, which resembles a huge blue lion with a golden mane.  It can use its powerful claws and teeth to fight against enemy Megazords. Go-Buster Ace can ride on the Animal-mode’s back when it is in its humanoid form.

The Second is its Buddy Vehicle mode, a huge motorcycle that Red Buster’s Go-Buster Ace mecha can ride. In this mode it is armed with the Lioncer Gun, a twin-barreled energy blaster. 

It’s third mode is Buddyzord mode, a humanoid robot using the lion head and mane as a shield and armed with the Linocer Gun in a spear configuration.

In the Pokemon fandom, every once in a while you stumble upon a ‘Pokeballs are $200′ joke. In reference to how Pokeballs cost 200 of the in-game currency:

What a lot of fans, especially more casual ones, don’t seem to realize is that the currency in the Pokemon games it based on the Japanese yen. The symbol for the currency in the games even resembles the yen symbol:

In fact, according to Bulbapedia, the ‘Poke dollar’ symbol was specifically created for the English translations of the games, and the original Japanese versions use the yen symbol.

Now, for perspective, although the exact exchange rate naturally varies, a US dollar is equivalent to about 120 Japanese yen. So, 200 yen is about $1.67. 

A Pokeball in the Pokemon games actually cost less then two bucks. 

There’s a REASON we see so many young kids training Pokemon, especially early in the games. The cost of investing into a Pokeball to try catching their own Pokemon easily falls into the range of a typical kid’s allowance. A Potion for healing after battles is 300 (or about $2.50), but since Pokemon Centers offer their healing services for free, that’s a moot point.

Youngsters in the early game only give within a range from 50-150 of the currency, which is about equivalent to $0.40-$1.25. The first Gym Leader in Hoenn Region, Roxanne, give 1,680 in Omega Ruby/Alpha Sapphire, equivalent to about $14. Which is about right for the equivalent of a middle or high school honors student. A later Gym Leader, Winona, gives 4,200, or about $35. The Champion, Steven, gives 11600, or $96.67.

The winnings from enemy Trainers varies, but Ace Trainers seem to give out about 1500 or $14 on average, give or take. Swimmers (especially common later in ORAS), award a range from 400-800, or $3.33-$6.67.

Vitamins (such as Calcium, Iron, and HP UP), cost 9,800 or $81.67 each. An Ultra Ball cost 1,200, or $10. A Paralyze Heal costs the same as a Pokeball, while an Awakening is half that. A Revive is 1,500, or $12.50.

What’s the point of doing this? Well, for one, to get a better sense of the in-game economics, which can be hard to grasp if one doesn’t realize the in-game ‘Poke dollars’ are based on the Japanese yen. And a look at said economics reveals some interesting details.

First, it shows basic Pokemon training and raising is well within the affordability of a ten-year old, or older. Which makes sense as Pokemon is aimed at younger kids, and the develops would want them to have the sense that going on a Pokemon journey is something they could do if they somehow ended up in the Pokemon world.

On the other hand, it also shows there’s really not that much money to be made in Pokemon raising and traning, unless you battle frequently and regularly against higher-level opponents regularly and and win. Which is…very much in line with how professional sports work in real-life. Pokemon battling gets compared to a sporting event a lot for a reason. The initial 3-D games were even called Pokemon *Stadium.* Parallels are frequently drawn between the Pokemon League tournaments and the Olympics in the anime. The low money output is probably also why we often see Gym Leaders and the like working other jobs.

Just something interesting I decided to look into. I’m a Pokemon fan first, before any other fandom, and always will be. It’s shocking that I haven’t written any meta on it yet.

Hope you enjoyed!

EDIT:  As pointed out by invenblocker:

The 1000000 price for the bicycle translates to $8259.51, which is the price of a top quality bike for proffesionals.

Excellent catch! Helps explain why the bikes can ride through stuff like snow and sand. They are of excellent make.

And it also helps explain why the bike shop owners are happy to give out their bikes to a prospective Pokemon Trainer for free (whether through a voucher or otherwise). Your average Trainer taking the Gym challenge puts those bikes through the *wringer.* Riding them along mountains, through marshes, and even through snow. But a bike being able to endure that is the kind of thing a professional rider would look for, and desire.

Most Pokemon Trainers will never be able to afford the bikes, but are in one of the best positions to push them to their limits. So giving them out for free is actually a clever marketing move. Imagine a potential buyer seeing a Trainer riding one of those bikes in Lillycove, and said Trainer reveals they rode it from Rustboro (which means they rose it around a mountain, several caves, a few marshes, and possibly other environments I’m not thinking of right now). That’s a hell of an impression to make, and a fast, easy way to sell the buyer on getting the bike themselves, especially if they ride competitively.

Case in point, in Pokemon Gold/Silver and their re-makes, the bike shop even gives you the bike specifically as ‘advertising.’ After you’ve ridden it around long enough, you get a call saying that because of you doing so, their sales have shot through the roof (and happily tell you to keep the bike). And it’s no wonder why.

I am tired of seeing posts say something to the effect of “if aphobia isn’t enough to motivate you, remember that REGs also target [insert more “sympathetic” group here].”

Aphobia is enough. Aphobia matters. Aphobia is heinous enough, cruel enough, horrible enough to stand on its own and to be worth fighting on its OWN merits. 

Yes, gatekeepers throw lots of different groups under the bus. Yes, all of those groups deserve attention and deserve to have their issues recognized and fought for. And yes, it is valuable to observe and point out the ways that the foundational tactics of exclusionists repeat themselves in every iteration of the theme.

But y’all need to stop tacking aces and aros on as an afterthought on your posts about it and undermining the support you give us by backpedaling in the very same breath as you defend us, by giving people an excuse to dismiss us from our own activism.

It makes me feel like my pain, my suffering, my oppression is not good enough to count, as though the only reason my issues are being given any attention at all, after years of incredibly difficult fighting to bring my community into the light, is because other, better victims are being hurt by similar forces and tactics. It feels like a tacit validation of the sector of the community that insists that my issues are not real or do not matter.

And that sucks. 

We matter. We are enough. We are worth fighting for.

triforce06  asked:

Do you have any good recommendations for old comics? I would love to get into them but honestly I have no idea where to start.

The Stan Lee/Jack Kirby Fantastic Four was the towering achievement of the 1960s and my favorite comic of all time. Their current shabby treatment by their parent company is inexcusable; Marvel was built by Fantastic Four. FF is my favorite comic ever because it is “hot” and “cold” at the same time, a balancing act that is hard to do in science fiction. It has far out scifi adventures like shrinking to explore a world inside an atom or fighting Galactus the World Devourer, or a villain as melodramatic as Doctor Doom…but we believe in it because of how grounded it is in a real world, with wisecracking, warm characters we like. Every FF story ends in some far out way, but we believe it because of how it starts with something everyday, like the Thing buying hot dogs in Central Park while walking with his girlfriend. It’s like Stan discovered the formula for Coca-Cola; it’s very, very, very hard to tell a bad Fantastic Four story. Sure, FF is great, but it gets ultra-great starting around issue 43, and has an unbroken string of the greatest stories ever for 40 issues: the Coming of Galactus, the introduction of the Black Panther, the introduction of the Inhumans, Doctor Doom stealing the Silver Surfer’s powers (what a shocker that was).

Joe Kubert’s Enemy Ace comic is maybe the best war book ever written, about an honorable German flying ace in World War I. Hans von Hammer had noble and chivalrous instincts: he saluted enemies even after he killed them, and refused to shootan unarmed foe. He once befriended a wolf in the Black Forest, because the both of them were killers, and that wolf was his only real friend. He was the ultimate example of how war shapes even decent men into killers.

Russ Manning’s Magnus Robot Fighter is a crackerjack action-scifi comic that has aged better, not worse since the 1960s, because it’s all about the terror of a society that is overmechanized and under surveillance, where you hate machines but also need them and can’t get rid of them. The fully detailed, realized science fiction world of North Am is what makes it so interesting. Magnus is the Defiant Man in a screwy world; I wonder why John Carpenter never took an interest in making Magnus Robot Fighter as a movie, it would so fit his sensibilities.

If you ask guys who were around for it what they like about Jim Starlin’s Dreadstar, you get the same answer if you asked a wired little kid why they like sugar and caffeine. It was one of the first and best of the “creator owned, adult scifi comics” to come around in the early 1980s, with Vance Dreadstar leading rebels against an Empire. There’s also some bizarre Moorcock inspired mysticism at work. Best of all, Dreadstar is now widely available and reprinted; you owe it to yourself to check it out.

Speaking of adult oriented scifi comics, check out Alan Zelenetz’s Alien Legion. It’s about a futuristic French Foreign Legion made up of convicts, drifters, cutthroats, and criminals from across the known planets. The Legionnaires are expendable and are often sent on suicide missions, political objectives are often at odds with military ones, and a lot of them talk about desertion at times.

Star Brand by Jim Shooter is maybe the only comic that ever did anything interesting with the dead end idea, what would a superhero look like in the real world? It’s a comedy about how we never live up to our potential. When the hero comes back to earth from space, he finds he gets incredibly lost and can’t find his hometown. When he tries to stop a hostage crisis, he realizes that even with powers, he wonders what he could really do that wouldn’t make things worse or escalate the situation. It’s the people that make it worth it: our hero has conflicted feelings about two women, one a single mom, and the other is a girl that loves him, but so much that it doesn’t feel healthy.

Dave Stevens’ Rocketeer is a great retro comic, but the selling point is something that never entirely made it into the film adaptation: it’s all about the sex appeal of good looking girls. I once asked an art teacher of mine what it would take to make a living as an artist, and he told me, “draw good looking girls. If you can, you will never be out of work.” Well, Dave Stevens could, and he’d still be doing it today if not for his tragic passing.

If you’re the kind of person who likes to cry a lot (”sad is happy for deep people”), check out Strikeforce: Morituri, an early 80s comic with a fascinating premise. In order to fight off an alien invasion, a means of giving people superpeople is created, but it has a horrible cost: it gives you only a year to live. It’s all about mortality, nobility, and sacrifice and is really melancholic. Essentially, every single character has a terminal illness. 

8

Christmas With The Super-Heroes #2 “Silent Night” by John Byrne w/ Andy Kubert & Glenn Whitmore. 1989.

John shared this behind scenes story about this issue:

Bit of backstory on this one – I had long wanted to do something with Hans von Hammer, but no real opportunity presented itself. Then I was asked to contribute something to this Xmas issue, and for some reason the ol’ Enemy Ace sprang immediately to the front of my brain. But there was one problem, given the nature of the story I wanted to do: no one at DC could tell me if von Hammer could speak English!

Hence, a silent night!

Ok so I haven’t read the newer jughead comics (I really want to!) but I have to address this. Jughead is ARO ace. As in he’s aromatic and asexual. Not only was he confirmed as asexual, he has always made his stance on romance very clear. He hates romance, he doesn’t want to be a part of it. He’s very clearly aromatic asexual. The reason I say this, is because I’ve been seeing a lot of anti ace posts lately… I’ve been hanging around in the jughead tag lately (cuz they sock me right in the feels) and I keep seeing posts that are like “ugh no offense, jughead is gay” “screw aromatic, het aces are gross” “why have a lame cishet jughead when you could have gay jughead”. STOP.

Asexuality can be complicated to explain. You can be ace and still be in a gay or get relationship. You can be ace and be bi or pan romantic. You can be aro ace. But no matter what, asexuals are asexuals. And if someone is asexual and in a het relationship or none at all, that doesn’t make them any less asexual/LGBT+. It’s the same thing you do to bisexuals,you don’t get to decide when that person is or is not their identity. No matter what relationship an asexual person is in- asexuality is valid regardless of the gender of their partner.

In this case, jughead jones is aro ace (as far as I can tell, the romantic part could be up for interpretation but I legitimately believe he’s aro as I can understand his language regarding romantic relationships) He’s not boring or gross for not being in a gay relationship. He’s not a liar and an oppressor for being aro ace- and neither are the real aro ace people who have to hear this in a ace character tag that they went on to see representation. Things like that are gross.

Stop going into ace character tags and saying ‘no this character is gay, and saying he’s anything but is gross and homophobic’ because you know that not true. Leave asexuals alone. Especially when a lot of asexuals didn’t even learn about themselves till going on this freaking website only to have the people that they thought would be accepting do this constantly.