endorphin's

“I’m a pleasure seeker. The pleasures that I can feel right now like laughter, joy, and endorphins are absolutely important to me. That’s why I’m happy every day. Rather than tormenting myself, thinking of bygone things, I think that I am more enriched by eating something good when I want and going on a walk when I want. I try not to think about things like the past or the future. If I live in the future, I’m uneasy, and if I live in the past, only regrets are left. My motto originally was ‘Let’s not grow up,’ but recently I added one thing: 'Let’s not grow up, but live in the present.’”

“저는 쾌락주의자예요. 지금 느낄 수 있는 웃음, 즐거움, 엔돌핀 같은 쾌락을 엄청 중요하게 생각하거든요. 그래서 매일 행복해요. 지나간 일 생각하며 괴로워 하는 것 보다야 지금 당장 맛있는거 먹고, 하고 싶은 산책하는게 저를 더 풍요롭게 한다고 생각하거든요. 과거나 미래 그런거 생각 안하려고요. 미래를 살면 불안하고 과거를 살면 후회만 남으니까요. 제 모토가 원래 ‘철들지 말자’ 였는데 최근에 하나 더 추가했어요. ‘철들지 말고 현재를 살자.’”

In the spirit of Space Australia posts...

I like the idea of humans not being the only species with a need to unecessarily bond and form ‘packs’ and whatnot, or the only species to enjoy putting themselves in danger for the adrenaline rush, or the only species to recreationally poison themselves, or even the only species to have parties.

You know what I love, though?

Crowd psychology and the concept of group flow.

I love the idea that humans are the species that is in love with group flow. Sure, any alien can listen to music and enjoy it, maybe even go to concerts in large groups. But humans are the only non-telepathic species where going in a large group enhances the experience simply because you know that dozens or hundreds or even thousands of other people are all getting in the zone with you at the same time for the same reason. Any alien can go to a concert, but they marvel at the sight of hundreds of humans singing along to their favorite artist not because it makes the song objectively better, but because it enhances the experience.

I love the idea of aliens trying to figure out mob psychology, looking at sports fandoms and the riots that happen if a team fails to win a game, and asking themselves and other humans how it gets to that point. Because they can put the same human in front of the same game and get two entirely different results based on whether the human is alone or not. A lone human may break a bottle or curse, but they will likely not do more than that, unless they go online to rant. A human in a group that feels the same way can do much more damage.

I love the idea of aliens trying to figure out the aspect of performative grief for dead celebrities, not understanding that it is not only practice for when a death comes closer to home, but that it is a form of bonding, a call and an echo of “I feel this way too. This person mattered to me too,” across thousands or millions of people’s screens and faces and pens.

I love the idea of aliens taking a look at frat parties and nightclubs and karaoke and being so confused, because they can understand that intoxication might be fun, sometimes, or that singing or dancing with strangers can be fun, but the sheer chaos of an out-of-control college party is terrifying to them. There is nothing here that people will enjoy come the morning, but somehow that doesn’t matter, because in that moment, with those people, the humans are connecting as they sing their drunken songs or eat their terrible food or dance the night away. There is a sense of belonging even in this awful mess, for those who know how to find it.

I love the idea of aliens looking at conventions and wondering how it is that there is such a difference in a person wearing a costume in the privacy of their home and wearing it to a large con, how the endorphin levels soar even when the human is not receiving compliments, just because the convention is an echo chamber of “I love this show, this character, this franchise, this life.”

I love the idea of aliens coming to earth and understanding the meaning of bonds and enjoying music and knowing fiction and surviving our weather and planets and everything and still not being able to understand how a room full of strangers with no telepathy can feel so connected and in-tune simply by sharing an experience. The feelings aren’t always positive ones, but they are there, and there is a comfort in sharing them with endless people you’ve never met.

Anyway, that’s my contribution for Space Australia.

Bob Harper had a heart attack.  Now leave fat people alone.

Bob Harper, a former trainer on the Biggest Loser, has been one of the fittest men on television for over a decade.  He had a massive heart attack a couple of weeks ago and was hospitalized for eight days.

Bob Harper – a fitness guru who’s the host of “The Biggest Loser” – suffered a heart attack that left him unconscious for 2 days.

Harper tells us he was working out in a NYC gym 2 weeks ago when he collapsed. A doctor who was also working out administered CPR and used paddles to keep Bob alive.

The 51-year-old was taken to the hospital and says he woke up 2 days later. He was hospitalized for 8 days and is still in NYC – he lives in L.A. – because his doctors have not cleared him to fly.

(cont. TMZ)

Heart disease and heart attacks run in Bob Harper’s family and he says it’s all genetics.  I’m sure he’s absolutely right, but why are we okay agreeing with a fit man who says his heart attack was genetics while we view fat people who say “it’s genetics” with such disdain?

Keep reading

Submitted by @ ronyyaya

Humans are absurdly overengineered generalists

Humans are proportionally weak compared to arthropods, they’re slow compared to horses/wolves, they’re dumb compared to Artificial Intelligence, they’re fragile compared to megafauna like elephants, their socialization is nonexistant compared to true eusocial/pack species, and they’re clumsy compared to octopodes.  They’re not bad at anything, however, and they can repurpose a skill for anything (e.g. they can socialize with strangers, they can reuse domain specific knowledge for other stuff, they can use one type of movement for a lot of tasks, etc) which is not super common.  Most importantly, though, humans can continue functioning after almost any injury.

leg bones? There are 2, so breaking one is no more than an inconvenience in the short term until the endorphins wear off.

lungs? Again, theyre redundant.  Function can be temporarily restored with TAPE!

Tendons/ligaments?  Those are redundant too!

WE CAN EVEN FUNCTION THROUGH SEVERE BRAIN DAMAGE

IDK what aliens would think of us, between “what kind of idiot would design that?” and “thats so cool, what excuse/purpose can we find for one as a crewmember?”

Mental Health Check

You betta check yo self!

1. Did you eat in the last 8 hours? 

- remember it’s better to eat junk food than nothing at all. If the only thing you want to eat is unhealthy, that’s ok, let yourself eat it. 

- Your body needs energy! Even if you aren’t hungry you should eat a little bit, otherwise your metabolism will slow down and you will feel tired and slow. 

- If you are too busy to stop and have a meal try and grab something quick like an apple, or a handful of nuts.

2. Did you smile or laugh today?

- laughter releases endorphins, stress releasing hormones, and antibodies that help fight infection and disease!

- smile at yourself in the mirror for thirty seconds

- look up a funny video and make yourself laugh at it even if it’s a bit unnatural at first. Sometimes once you get laughing your laugh becomes funny too and then you can’t stop!

3. Did you drink enough water today? 

- Water is so important. It flushes all the bad stuff out of your body. Without it your blood thickens and your brain might get a little foggy. 

- If you forget to drink water try to drink a glass before a meal, or before bed, or right after waking up! This might help you remember!

- The recommended amount is 8 eight ounce glasses per day. It’s okay if you don’t drink the recommended amount. Everybody’s body is different and it depends on the amount of physical activity you do in a day. Just drink what you can, your body, and skin, and brain will thank you for every drop!

4. What do you need to be happier?

-Do you need to take some medication that you forgot about? Do you need to see a doctor? Remember, mental health is just like physical health. Make sure you are taking care of yourself!

-  Go for a walk, do a few pushups, or jumping jacks, or hula hooping. Whatever you feel like! Even if it is just for a second it will help you by releasing endorphins!

- Wash your bed sheets with some yummy smelling soap or essential oil. 

- open the window for some fresh air and open the blinds for

- Maybe you could call up a friend or a relative and talk to them for a few minutes. 

- Make sure you get a full nights sleep. Sleep is your bodies way of healing and resetting itself. (If you have trouble sleeping try turning your phone off at 9pm. Make sure you never eat in your bed or do other activities. It will help you to sleep if your body knows your bed is just for sleeping.)

- Find something that you love! Do you love a certain type of food? Spend some time making it! Do you like to read? See if you can borrow a new book. Be it knitting, yoga, drawing, soccer, dancing, listening to music, writing, beading, playing rugby, making sock puppets. Whatever it is, do it! 

- Set goals for yourself. Discover what you are good at and what you want to be good at. Improve. Be proud of yourself when you smash your goals and try again when you fail. 

What Falling In Love Does To Your Heart and Brain

Getting struck by Cupid’s arrow may very well take your breath away and make your heart go pitter-patter this Valentine’s Day, reports sexual wellness specialists at Loyola University Health System.


Originally posted by iglovequotes

“Falling in love causes our body to release a flood of feel-good chemicals that trigger specific physical reactions,”

said Pat Mumby, PhD, Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Neurosciences, Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine (SSOM). 

“This internal elixir of love is responsible for making our cheeks flush, our palms sweat and our hearts race.”

Levels of these substances, which include dopamine, adrenaline and norepinephrine, increase when two people fall in love. Dopamine creates feelings of euphoria while adrenaline and norepinephrine are responsible for the pitter-patter of the heart, restlessness and overall preoccupation that go along with experiencing love.

MRI scans indicate that love lights up the pleasure center of the brain. When we fall in love, blood flow increases in this area, which is the same part of the brain implicated in obsessive-compulsive behaviors.

“Love lowers serotonin levels, which is common in people with obsessive-compulsive disorders," 

said Mary Lynn, DO, Department of Obstetrics & Gynecology, SSOM. 

"This may explain why we concentrate on little other than our partner during the early stages of a relationship.”

Doctors caution that these physical responses to love may work to our disadvantage.

“The phrase ‘love is blind’ is a valid notion because we tend to idealize our partner and see only things that we want to see in the early stages of the relationship,” Dr. Mumby said. “Outsiders may have a much more objective and rational perspective on the partnership than the two people involved do.”

Originally posted by enjoy-the-life-baby


There are three phases of love, which include lust, attraction and attachment. 

Lust is a hormone-driven phase where we experience desire. Blood flow to the pleasure center of the brain happens during the attraction phase, when we feel an overwhelming fixation with our partner. 

This behavior fades during the attachment phase, when the body develops a tolerance to the pleasure stimulants. Endorphins and hormones vasopressin and oxytocin also flood the body at this point creating an overall sense of well-being and security that is conducive to a lasting relationship.