endore

people talk about how extra anakin and luke are but no one ever mentions how leia:

  • was scheduled for execution when luke and han freed her from her cell and still gave them a shit about it
  • proclaimed her love to a smuggler in front of half the empire before he was frozen in carbonite
  • blinks whenever she shoots; still manages to kill troopers
  • impulsively pursued a trooper on endor, tried to get him to fall from his bike, fell from her bike herself, then waited until said trooper hit a tree so she could faint
  • rescued her lover from jabba and when he couldn’t see her, instead of saying her name, said ‘someone who loves you’
  • told a guy he had an awful smell while suggesting vader is the emperor’s dog, all within one sentence
  • was virtually proclaimed the ewok princess while wearing a brand new dress while her friends were going to be the ewoks’ dinner
  • kissed her own brother in order to make the guy she likes jealous
  • insulted the millennium falcon and her pilot right before they were supposed to save her (on more than one occasion)
  • ignored han as he tried to save her from echo base by bossing people around when they were all supposed to evacuate
  • willingly almost let chewie choke lando
  • yelled ‘IT’S A TRAP!’ dramatically first
  • called han a stuck up half-witted scruffy looking nerf-herder; made out with him 3 days later
  • legit made out with han in front of darth fucking vader
Melkor ‘incarnated’ himself (as Morgoth) permanently. He did this so as to control the hroa, the 'flesh’ or physical matter, of Arda. He attempted to identify himself with it. A vaster, and more perilous, procedure, though of similar sort to the operations of Sauron with the Rings. Thus, outside the Blessed Realm, all 'matter’ was likely to have a 'Melkor ingredient’, and those who had bodies, nourished by the hroa of Arda, had as it were a tendency, small or great, towards Melkor: they were none of them wholly free of him in their incarnate form, and their bodies had an effect upon their spirits.

But in this way Morgoth lost (or exchanged, or transmuted) the greater part of his original 'angelic’ powers, of mind and spirit, while gaining a terrible grip upon the physical world. For this reason he /had/ to be fought, mainly by physical force, and enormous material ruin was a probable consequence of any direct combat with him, victorious or otherwise. This is the chief explanation of the constant reluctance of the Valar to come into open battle against Morgoth. Manwe’s task and problem was much more difficult than Gandalf’s. Sauron’s, relatively smaller, power was /concentrated/; Morgoth’s vast power was /disseminated/. The whole of 'Middle-earth’ was Morgoth’s Ring, though temporarily his attention was mainly upon the North-west. Unless swiftly successful, War against him might well end in reducing all Middle-earth to chaos, possibly even all Arda.
—  Tolkien, J. R. R. The History of Middle-Earth X: Morgoth’s Ring. Ed. Christopher Tolkien. (London: HarperCollins, 2002.) 399-400 (Myths Transformed, Text VII “Notes on motives in the Silmarillion, (ii))
If [Sam had not unwittingly foiled Gollum’s repentance], what could then have happened? The course of the entry into Mordor and the struggle to reach Mount Doom would have been different, and so would the ending. The interest would have shifted to Gollum, I think, and the battle that would have gone on between his repentance and his new love on one side and the Ring. Though the love would have been strengthened daily it could not have wrested the mastery from the Ring. I think that in some queer twisted and pitiable way Gollum would have tried (not maybe with conscious design) to satisfy both. Certainly at some point not long before the end he would have stolen the Ring or taken it by violence (as he does in the actual Tale). But ‘possession’ satisfied, I think he would then have sacrificed himself for Frodo’s sake and have /voluntarily/ cast himself into the fiery abyss.

I think that an effect of his partial regeneration by love would have been a clearer vision when he claimed the Ring. He would have perceived the evil of Sauron, and suddenly realized that he could not use the Ring and had not the strength or stature to keep it in Sauron’s despite: the only way to keep it and hurt Sauron was to destroy it and himself together – and in a flash he may have seen that this would also be the greatest service to Frodo.
—  Tolkien, J.R.R. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. Ed. Humphrey Carpenter and Christopher Tolkien. (London: HarperCollins, 2006.) 330 (L246)
Star Wars Galaxy Asks
  • Alderaan: What is the most beautiful sight you have ever seen?
  • Bespin: Do you enjoy a cloudy day?
  • Coruscant: If you could live in a big city, which city would you choose? Describe your ideal home and location if you had unlimited funds!
  • Endor: Which sort of wilderness would you prefer to explore?
  • Geonosis: Are you compassionate towards insects?
  • Hoth: Is snow beautiful and welcome, or unpleasant and inconvenient?
  • Jakku: Name somewhere you never want to return to? And why?
  • Kamino: When did you last see the ocean?
  • Kashyyyk: What is your favourite fluffy creature?
  • Mandalore: Do you believe that peace is always possible?
  • Mon Calamari: Do you like seafood?
  • Mustafar: Do you play with fire?
  • Naboo: If you were a world leader, what would you stand for?
  • Tatooine: Do you like sand..?
  • Yavin 4: What are your squad goals?
I'm disgusted

I honestly do not understand how Julie and the writers can be so okay with Bonnie’s character going seasons after seasons dealing with loss, torment, and hopelessness. What else does she have to endore for them to finally let her character be? When Elena comes back alive and she dies??
They had her grandma die, her mother and father killed, had her and Jeremy take turns dying to save one another, you had her be stuck in the prison world with Kai who hurt her, you had trapped alone in the prison world by herself where she almost KILLED HERSELF, You have her life linked to her “best friend” that if she wakes up at any point Bonnie DIES, you had Damon aka her best friend leave her and made her feel alone, and all the other things Bonnie endured in the 8 seasons of this show. Yet you have the one guy, the only guy that she really loved who was willing to TURN for her, to have a life with her they really did kill him off.
I don’t see how one can be okay with this?? How are they writing these storylines? They must be in their offices like “hmmmm how can we ruin Bonnie’s character this time? 🙃🙃🙃”
It’s disgusting and Bonnie deserves so much more! She deserves Happiness! She deserves Love!
WHY CAN’T THEY JUST LET HER HAVE THAT?!?!

Sauron had not served Morgoth, even in his last stages, without becoming infected by his lust for destruction, and his hatred of God (which must end in nihilism). Sauron could not, of course, be a ‘sincere’ atheist. Though one of the minor spirits created before the world, he knew Eru, according to his measure. He probably deluded himself with the notion that the Valar (including Melkor) having failed, Eru had simply abandoned Ea, or at any rate Arda, and would not concern himself with it any more. It would appear that he interpreted the 'change of the world’ at the Downfall of Númenor, when Aman was removed from the physical world, in this sense: Valar (and Elves) were removed from effective control, and Men under God’s curse and wrath. If he thought about the Istari, especially Saruman and Gandalf, he imagined them as emissaries from the Valar, seeking to establish their lost power again and 'colonize’ Middle-earth, as a mere effort of defeated imperialists (without knowledge or sanction of Eru). His cynicism, which (sincerely) regarded the motives of Manwe as precisely the same as his own, seemed fully justified in Saruman. Gandalf he did not understand. But certainly he had already become evil, and therefore stupid, enough to imagine that his different behaviour was due simply to weaker intelligence and lack of firm masterful purpose. He was only a rather cleverer Radagast - cleverer, because it is more profitable (more productive of power) to become absorbed in the study of people than of animals.
—  Tolkien, J. R. R. The History of Middle-Earth X: Morgoth’s Ring. Ed. Christopher Tolkien. (London: HarperCollins, 2002.) 397 (Myths Transformed, Text VII “Notes on motives in the Silmarillion” (i))

The bridge scene on Endor is the moment Han realizes that it doesn’t matter if Leia loves him back; all that matters is that he loves Leia.

You know the scene: right after Luke confesses to Leia that they’re siblings and then immediately leaves to confront Vader.

Enter Han. He insists that Leia tell him what’s wrong even after she tells him that she just wants to be alone.

Leia says, “I can’t tell you,” to which Han responds with jealousy, saying, “Could you tell Luke? Is that who you could tell?”

At this, we see Leia cry for the first time, and Han starts to walk off. He then pauses for a moment

then turns around and walks back to Leia. In that moment, during that pause before he walks back, Han realizes that he loves Leia whether she loves him or not. He goes back and apologizes - Han Solo apologizes. And you know that’s not something he does lightly or often because that would be admitting that he did something wrong.

Leia looks at him, considers him, and responds with “Hold me” while collapsing into Han. Now this is clearly something new for Han. He looks shocked and almost a little scared by the embrace, like he’s never done this before.

He sort of awkwardly pats her, like he’s trying to figure out how this thing works. In a matter of seconds, he’s gone from a macho man who walks away from a crying woman because of his own jealous to a man who is so in love that he’ll hold her even if he doesn’t know how.

“You have that power, too”

Y’all mind if I talk about feminism real quick?

I love that scene from “Return of the Jedi” where Luke confesses the truth to Leia on the Endor bridge. Mentally I’ve always titled that “the Luke and Leia are twins” scene, but now I think I’m going to remember it for that line Luke tells Leia.  More than just saying “I’m your brother and Vader is our father”, he tells her she has the Force and it’s strong in her. And the way he phrases it is so beautiful:

“You have that power, too. In time you’ll learn to use it as I have.”

And then he proceeds to tell her about the family tree. But how awesome is the equality in that statement? Not “I’m strong in the Force and I guess you can be as well but I’ll have to teach you”.  No, “you have that power, too.”  And then the invitation that “Leia, one day, you will be strong in the Force because you are strong in everything you do.” I’ve already written a ton of meta about how Luke really looks up to Leia, and I think in that scene the power is passed off in a way, but it’s a really beautiful moment between the twins. A real moment of equality. 

And that quote alone, “you have that power, too” is just such a good quote for feminism, equality, and even liberation, I’d love to see Star Wars fans adopt it as our slogan. I’d love to see this on a t-shirt. It’s a really underrated moment but it is so good

Sauron was of course not ‘evil’ in origin. He was a 'spirit’ corrupted by the Prime Dark Lord (the Prime sub-creative Rebel) Morgoth. He was given an opportunity of repentance, when Morgoth was overcome, but could not face the humiliation of recantation, and suing for pardon; and so his temporary turn to good and 'benevolence’ ended in a greater relapse, until he became the main representative of Evil of later ages. But at the beginning of the Second Age he was still beautiful to look at, or could still assume a beautiful visible shape – and was not indeed wholly evil, not unless all 'reformers’ who want to hurry up with 'reconstruction’ and 'reorganization’ are wholly evil, even before pride and the lust to exert their will eat them up. The particular branch of the High-Elves concerned, the Noldor or Loremasters, were always on the side of 'science and technology’, as we should call it: they wanted to have the knowledge that Sauron genuinely had, and those of Eregion refused the warnings of Gilgalad and Elrond. The particular 'desire’ of the Eregion Elves – an 'allegory’ if you like of a love of machinery, and technical devices – is also symbolised by their special friendship with the Dwarves of Moria.
—  Tolkien, J.R.R. The Letters of J.R.R. Tolkien. Ed. Humphrey Carpenter and Christopher Tolkien. (London: HarperCollins, 2006.) 190 (L153)