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For sixpenceee !

The scaly ant eater, also known as the pangolin , is a mammal armored with large, keratin plates covering the top of its body. They are found in both Africa and Asia and are around 12 – 40 inches in size on average.

In the event of an attack, the pangolin will curl up into a ball to shield itself, hence its name, which derives from the Bahasa Malaysian word “pengguling” which means “roll up”.

They are also able to release an unpleasant gas, much like a skunk.

A solitary and nocturnal animal, the scaly ant eater survives on a diet of termites and ants, for which they use their long tongue to pick off their prey. Their tongues are often longer than their bodies, at around 16inches.

Unfortunately for the Pangolins, they are heavily hunted for both their armor as well as their meat.

Seen as a delicacy in some countries, they are often hunted and exported to countries in Asia, as there is a unsubstantiated belief that the keratin armor has certain medicinal properties.

This, as well as the Pangolins natural habitats being largely destroyed by deforestation, has earned them a place on the red list.

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sooooooo mortior and i and some other awesome people miiiiight be working on a little big something something. aaaaaaand it’s going to be fucking amazing and awesome. and that’s all i’m telling you. expect more teasers down the road.

disclaimer no we are not doing all 24 trolls dear lord. this is most likely it. we considered bringing equiusbot back but couldn’t really work it out to make much sense. 

rip in pieces

motherboard.vice.com
Who Killed the Venus Flytrap?
In the public consciousness, the Venus flytrap is prolific. But in the wild, it's disappearing.

A good read on the sad state of the Venus Flytrap. Carnivorous plants native to the USA are increasingly close to becoming extinct, for absolutely no logical reason. All are easy to cultivate and readily available for under $10-$20. There is no need to poach whatsoever. Help save North American carnivores—we have more genera of carnivorous plant than ANY other continent, including the tropics.

Can you spot the snow leopard?

Click here to find out if you were right!

Inger Vandyke and her team sat for six hours watching the snow leopard that’s camouflaged in the photo above. Known as the “ghosts of the mountains,” snow leopards are super stealth, but they’re also endangered—there are only about 1,000 of these amazing animals left in the wild. Check out the source article on Earth Touch News Network to find out if you spotted the leopard correctly, and to learn more about how they camouflage themselves. 

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The Smithsonian’s National Zoo is celebrating a conservation milestone; for the first time, a rare Spider Tortoise has hatched in the Reptile Discovery Center. Animal care staff are closely monitoring the hatchling, which emerged May 10 in an off-exhibit area.

Spider Tortoises are listed as “Critically Endangered” on the IUCN Red List of Threatened Species. Native to the forests and sandy coastlines of Madagascar, their populations have declined by 80 percent since 1970, and populations continue to dwindle due to habitat loss and wildlife trafficking for the food and pet trade.

Follow the link to ZooBorns, to learn more.
Photo Credits: Connor Mallon at Smithsonian’s National Zoo

Grandidier’s baobab (Adansonia grandidieri) is an endangered tree endemic to the Madagascar dry deciduous forests ecoregion. This ecoregion represents some of the world’s most species rich and most distinctive tropical dry forests characterized by very high local plant and animal endemism.

More about the Madagascar Dry Deciduous Forests Habitat:

Encyclopedia of Life

Image by Zigomar via Wikimedia Commons

Giraffes aren’t dangerous – but they will soon be endangered

An American trophy hunter has kicked off another social media furore after defending a recent giraffe kill in South Africa by claiming they were “very dangerous animals”. In one sense she is right – giraffes are big and strong and you certainly wouldn’t want one kicking you. But attacks on humans are very rare.                                

A more relevant question is whether hunting is a key threat to giraffes.The International Union for the Conservation of Nature (IUCN) Red List assessment does not list legal hunting as a threatening process at all. However illegal hunting for meat and trophies is listed as threatening as it reduces the effective size of their protected areas and, if allowed to proceed unchecked, can cause the collapse of wildlife populations. Giraffes are popular among bushmeat poachers because of their size, high meat yield and the ease with which they can be hunted.

The giraffe is currently listed as “least concern” on the IUCN Red List, but this doesn’t present the full picture. Back in 1999 wildlife expert Rod East estimated there were 140,000 in Africa – today the Giraffe Conservation Foundation estimates there are only 80,000 left. Such a rapid decline suggests they may soon qualify as being vulnerable to extinction.

No trophy hunters that way … or that way. Credit: Luca Galuzzi, CC BY-SA    

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NOAA Podcasts:  Saving the Leatherback Sea Turtle

The Leatherback is a most unusual species of sea turtle. In the Pacific, it’s also among the most endangered.

In celebration of Sea Turtle Day, today’s podcast is about leatherback sea turtles. Leatherbacks are the largest species of sea turtle out there, and they migrate farther than any other. And in the Pacific Ocean, they’re also among the most endangered.

To talk with us about leatherback sea turtles, we have Scott Benson on the line. Benson is a research biologist at NOAA’s Southwest Fisheries Science Center, and he’s an expert on leatherback sea turtles.

In this interview, Benson discusses some of the threats that leatherbacks face and what scientists, conservationists, and fishermen are doing to address those threats. He also explains what measures you as a consumer can take to help protect leatherback sea turtles.

(LISTEN HERE)

photographs by Karen Benson and Karin A. Forney/NOAA.

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Numbats once ranged across southern and central Australia, including Western Australia and New South Wales, but is now restricted to to two populations in southwest Western Australia (Dryandra Woodland and Perup Nature Reserve).  This decline has occurred since the arrival of Europeans and the predators they brought with them, particularly red foxes.  Dogs and cats will also prey on numbats, and the numbats have little defense against them.  The population is now down to less than a thousand animals, and is still declining.