The Dolphins had a section on the BBC News at one today (26/05/2015). Let’s hope immediate conservation efforts will soon be implemented with new population figures. 

OH MY GOSH YOU GUYS
DID YOU KNOW THAT YOU CAN “ADOPT” A KAKAPO AND GET A SUPER CUTE KAKAPO PLUSH?
I wish I could make the text vibrate back and forth to show you how exciting this is.


Adopting them helps their recovery efforts. Kakapos are critically endangered!
ADOPT A KAKAPO AND GET A CUTIE TO HUG: http://kakaporecovery.org.nz/adopt-a-kakapo/


(this photo is not mine and belongs to the Kakapo Recovery group!)

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GOOD NEWS FOR CONSERVATION:

Myanmar roofed turtles reintroduced to the wild

Species believed extinct until rediscovery in 2001

Congratulations to the Wildlife Conservation Society and the Turtle Survival Alliance in Myanmar for the recent release of 60 captive-raised Myanmar roofed turtles (Batagur trivittata) - a species believed to be extinct until 2001. We’re pleased to see the world’s second most endangered turtle on the road to recovery in its native habitat, and happy that funds from our Critically Endangered Animals Fund have helped support this effort!

Additional information on this particular project can be found at:

Wildlife Conservation Society - Roof Turtles


(via: USFWS_International Affairs)

photographs by Wildlife Conservation Society

Can you spot the snow leopard?

Click here to find out if you were right!

Inger Vandyke and her team sat for six hours watching the snow leopard that’s camouflaged in the photo above. Known as the “ghosts of the mountains,” snow leopards are super stealth, but they’re also endangered—there are only about 1,000 of these amazing animals left in the wild. Check out the source article on Earth Touch News Network to find out if you spotted the leopard correctly, and to learn more about how they camouflage themselves. 

BIG NEWS: The Louisiana black bear is no longer at risk for extinction thanks to conservation efforts over the past 20 years. President Theodore Roosevelt made the Louisiana black bear famous in 1902 when he spared one from his trophy collection and it became the inspiration for the “Teddy Bear.” Learn more: http://on.doi.gov/1JAsBTS

Photo of a Louisiana black bear eating grass by Pam McIlhenny, USFWS.

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A SAD REALITY:  The Countries With The Most Threatened Mammals

The map below shows the number of threatened mammals in countries across the world according to data from The World Bank.
The results of their research are disturbing; 25% of mammals are at risk of extinction. In total 1,201 mammal species are categorised as threatened.
Indonesia, Madagascar and Mexico lead the list and have more than 100 mammals at risk of disappearing. Animals such as the lemur, the Sumatran tiger and the vaquita (a small porpoise) are some of those harmed by hunting and human action.

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Sawfish (Pristidae)

Sawfishes, also known as carpenter sharks, are a family (Pristidae) of rays characterized by a long, narrow, flattened rostrum, or nose extension, lined with sharp transverse teeth, arranged so as to resemble a saw. Several species of sawfishes can grow to about 7 m. The family as a whole is largely unknown and little studied. All species of sawfishes are listed as Endangered or Critically Endangered by the IUCN, and face the threat of extinction as a result of habitat loss and overfishing. Sawfishes are marine, euryhaline (moving between freshwater and saltwater), or marginal (brackish water) species, and are widely distributed across tropical and warm temperate nearshore ocean waters in the Atlantic and Indo-Pacific. They inhabit inshore coastal areas such as coastal lagoons, estuarine environments, and the lower, brackish river deltas. Some species are known to frequently penetrate far into rivers and major lakes such as Lake Nicaragua. Though few details of their ecology are precisely known, sawfishes tend to prefer shallow, muddy, brackish water, spending most of their time on or near the seabed, visiting the surface occasionally.  Sawfishes are nocturnal, usually sleeping during the day and hunting at night. Despite fearsome appearances, they do not attack people unless provoked or surprised. The taxonomy of the sawfish family Pristidae has been described as chaotic, with uncertainty as to the true number of valid species. It contains two genera grouped by similar visual characteristics.

photo credits: wiki, Flavio Ferrari, whrhsmarineblog, underwater-fish, discoverlife