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You guysssss this is one of the cutest things on the internet. Happy Friday! | Repost @theberry |🐘This is important. #adorable #cute #elephant #elephants #babyelephant #animals #nature #wildlife #wildlifephotography #wildlifebiologist #fieldwork #wildlifeconservation #conservation #endangered #endextinction #chasing #funny #KeyConservation

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The kea is the only alpine parrot on the planet, and is one of ten parrot species endemic to New Zealand.  It belongs to the same family as the precious moss potato, the kakapo, and the colourful kaka.  Its clownish nature is so well-known that a group of kea is called a circus!

Lil’ rainbow-themed monarch butterfly sticker I created for iMessage sticker app Made With Care. This pack is designed to raise awareness of endangered species living on our planet - monarch butterfly being one of them. Sticker.Place collaboration for Earth Day.

All proceeds will be donated to WWF.

The Trump administration is delaying listing this bumblebee as officially endangered

  • Last month, the rusty patched bumblebee became the very first species of bees in the continental U.S. to be officially marked as “endangered” by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.
  • According to the Associated Press, the new designation was scheduled to go into effect on Friday, until the Trump administration delayed the move one day before.
  • The federal government announced the delay, which is in compliance with an order signed by Trump in January.
  • The regulation that would add the rusty patched bumblebee to the endangered species list, guaranteeing it federal protection, will be postponed until March 21.
  • According to the White House this will allow time for “reviewing questions of fact, law and policy they raise.” Read more (2/9/17 3:06 PM)

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Parrot of the Week 6

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Kākāpō

Scientific Name: Strigops habroptilus

Classification: Kingdom: Animalia > Phylum: Chordata > Class: Aves > Order: Psittaciformes >  Family: Strigopidae > Genus: Strigops > Species: habroptilus

Conservation Status: Critically Endangered; there are 153 as of 2016

Other Common Names: Night parrot, owl parrot, tarapo, tarepo

Average Length (wild): 23 – 25 in, 58 – 64 cm

Average Weight (wild): 2 – 9 lb, 0.95 – 4 kg

Originally posted by jesuisbavarde

Average Lifespan: 58 years, but have potential to live into their 90s. Their exact lifespan is unknown. Researchers in the recovery program will know when the kakapo hatched in the recovery effort die of old age, which could be decades from now.

(Above: Historic range; Below: Current range)

Native Range: Used to live from the far north of the North Island to the south of the South Island. Now they are only found on offshore islands that are protected areas without introduced predators. It is not believed that there are any left on the main land of New Zealand, when the recovery program began they were all captured from the Fiordland National Park and brought to protected zones. They currently live on Codfish Island (Whenua Hau), Little Barrier Island (Hauturu ao Toi), and Anchor Island.

Naturalized Range: N/A

Natural Habitat: Formally from sea level to near tops of mountains. They are ground dwellers who live in forest substrate and scrubland.

Flock Size: They are solitary, gathering only to breed

Originally posted by svartvitkatt

Call: Loud screeching “skraark

Breeding: They do not breed every year, as they will only breed when there is enough rimu fruit.

Breeding season starts around December and lasts until April

They engage in “lek” breeding, which is when the males compete for female attention. They are the only parrot species and New Zealand bird species to do this.

The male inflates like a balloon, and then emits a low boom which can be heard from up to 5 km away. This lets any females in the area know that he is ready to mate

After 20 -30 booms, the male emits a high-pitched ‘ching’, which pinpoints his position, allowing females to find him

This booming and chinging can last for 8 hours nonstop every night for 2-3 months during breeding season

(Above: Booming Sketch)

Nesting: The female lays 1-4 eggs. They are similar in size to chicken eggs and will hatch after 30 days. The female raises them by herself, and has to leave the nest at night to search for food. After 10 weeks, the fledglings leave the nest, but may still be fed by their mother for up to 6 months.

Wild Diet: The berries of the Rimu plant (see picture) are their favorite food. They also eat parts of other native plants, including the fruits, seeds, bark, bulbs, leaves, stems, mosses, ferns, fungi, and roots. Species include pink pine, stinkwood, Hall’s totara, and mountain flax. When food species that are important to their diet become abundant, they feed exclusively on it.

    Currently, they are also fed pellets, freeze-dried and frozen fruit, walnuts, and pine conelets by the recovery effort.

Sexually Dimorphic: Yes, the males are larger

Description (wild): The upper side of their body is green with random black, brown, and yellow barring and mottling. Their underparts are a yellow-green and have irregular yellow and brown barring. The face is yellow-brown and the beak is grey and smaller in females. The primary wing feathers are tipped with yellow in males and green and brown in females. The tail is green and brown with yellow and black barring and flecks.

Color Mutations: N/A

Noise Level: Loud

Talking Ability: N/A

Personality: They are nocturnal and solitary and roost on the ground or in trees during the day. When disturbed, they freeze, trying to blend in with their background.

Originally posted by biomorphosis

Behavioral Concerns: They are not equipped to deal with human intrusion and introduced predators, which caused their numbers to decline rapidly. By 1970, there were only 18 males left in Fiordland. In 1977, a small population of both males and females were found.

Health Concerns: Recently there has been an increase in cases of “crusty butt”, which is a viral infection that causes the cloaca to become inflamed, and presents like severe dermatitis. 

It is still unknown what is causing the virus and if it is infectious. There has been one death due to this infection, and treatment, a topical cream, seems to only help some individuals. 

As of now, it is only found on Codfish Island, and has been since 2002. 

It is being taken very seriously and is being closely monitored, with research being done to learn more about it.

Aviculture: N/A

History in Captivity: Some young chicks are raised in captivity as part of a Conservation attempt to save the species. Conservation and recovery of this species has been going one since 1977, when a population of both females and males were found on Stewart Island.

Fun Facts: They are the largest parrot species in the world (by weight) and possibly the oldest living bird!

Originally posted by welcometoyouredoom

Sirocco, a male kakapo born March 23, 1997, was raised in captivity due to a illness that required he be hand raised and quarantined from other kakapo. He now thinks he’s human and is a conservation ambassador for the kakapo. 

He proved that kakapo can swim, after deciding to join one of the rangers’ family who were swimming in the ocean. He jumped off the jetty and paddled around for a bit before going back to shore, completely nonchalant. 

He is also the kakapo who made his species famous after “shagging” Mark Cawardine on the BBC series “Last Chance to See”. 

You can follow him on twitter @Spokesbird

Originally posted by jerkandcry

Tags: @thescorpionqueen

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Cuban Land Snails Polymita picta

Polymita picta, common name the Cuban land snail or the painted snail, is a species of large, air-breathing land snail. Shells of Polymita picta can reach a length of about 20 millimeters (0.79 in). These large shells are shiny and very brightly colored. Normally they show a bright yellow color with a white stripe, but the species is well known for its colorful shell polymorphism, with numerous color varieties. These shells are sought after by poachers and used to make jewelry and trinkets. As a result, the species has become endangered.

Keep reading

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Kea look somewhat unimpressive on the ground, with their backs and breasts a dull, olive grey in colour.  When they are in flight, however, it’s a whole different story.  The kea’s underwings are a vivid orange-red, its flight feathers are a rich blue-green, and its rump is crimson.  These feathers aren’t just beautiful, they may have a vital function in communication; the red-orange that paints the undersides of the bird’s wings is visible in the UV spectrum, invisible to humans, but brilliant to birds!

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Zachary Quinto is on a mission to save the world’s 3,890 remaining tigers from extinction

  • Actor Zachary Quinto is on a mission to help save the world’s dwindling population of tigers.
  • “I’m a longtime, well-documented animal lover,” Quinto said in an interview. “I’m intrigued by and engaged in the conversations about our environment and the impact of our civilization on nature.”
  • But what really convinced him to join World Wildlife Fund (WWF) and Tiger Beer for the #3890Tigers movement is one staggering statistic:
  • One hundred years ago, there were 100,000 wild tigers. Today, as few as 3,890 remain in the wild. That’s a 96% population decline. Read more (7/13/17)

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Baby leatherback turtle crawling across the beach in Florida, heading for the ocean 

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The Saimaa ringed seal (Pusa hispida saimensis) is a subspecies of ringed seal (Pusa hispida). They are among the most endangered seals in the world, having a total population of only about 320 individuals. The only existing population of these seals is found in Lake Saimaa, Finland (hence the name).This seal, along with the Ladoga seal and the Baikal seal, is one of the few living freshwater seals.

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Most frogs are extremely vocal during the mating season, but the goliath frog is not.  In fact, it has no vocal cords, despite having excellent hearing!  During the breeding season, males will push rocks together into semi-circular nests where they will battle with other males to attract females.  The females will lay strings of several hundred eggs attached to masses of a single aquatic plant on the river bed.  Her tadpoles will feed only on this species of plant for the first three months of their lives before they metamorphose.  

Oddly, considering the adult frog’s giant size, the eggs and tadpoles are no larger than those of other frogs when they are young, though they grow to be quite large as they approach metamorphosis!

Happy #ManateeAppreciationDay! Gentle and solitary, West Indian manatees, Trichechus manatus, wander through both fresh and salt water. They keep to warm regions because they have no blubber, which insulates other marine mammals living in colder climates. Manatees also lack hind limbs needed to maneuver on land; they are born in water and remain there throughout their lives. Most marine mammals eat fish or invertebrates, but manatees feed only on seagrass and other plants growing in shallow water. Grazing and resting just below the surface, these “sea cows” come up for air every few minutes.

This is Una. She is currently staying at SeaWorld Orlando’s manatee rehabilitation center in one of our critical care pools. The white slatted floor is a hydraulic false bottom which can be raised in order to bring the animals up out of the water for medical treatment with minimal stress. Thanks to the tracking and observation efforts of the Manatee Rescue and Rehabilitation Partnership, we know quite a few details about her life. 

This isn’t her first time at SeaWorld. She was rescued as an orphaned calf in 2003, weighing in at 170lbs. At a weight of 980lbs, she was released at Blue Springs State Park with a few other manatees in 2006. She has been seen with a calf of her own, which is very exciting. However, she also suffered from at least one boat strike. She recovered and was left with five propeller scars on her back. Around 90% of manatees have wounds from boat strikes. The scars are used by scientists to identify individuals. Eventually, Una shed her tracking device but was still spotted regularly and easily recognized by the “A5” ID marking on her tail. In late November of 2016, she was discovered to be severely entangled. Both of her pectoral flippers were tightly wrapped in monofilament fishing line which had cut deeply into the tissue almost to the bone. This is what happens when people toss tangled up fishing line overboard or just let wads of it blow away. Please recycle monofilament fishing line properly.

 If you’d like to visit Una during her recovery, come see the Manatee Rehabilitation Area inside SeaWorld Orlando adjacent to the sea turtle habitat. The park is currently caring for 18 manatees. An adult manatee can eat around 200lbs of wet vegetation per day, and the little orphans are bottle fed specialized formula every two hours around the clock. Rescued patients need radiographs, ultrasounds, endoscopies, daily medications, tube feedings, wound care, and complicated surgical prodecures. SeaWorld of Orlando, Tampa’s Lowry Park Zoo, Miami Seaquarium, and the Jacksonville Zoo are the only facilites permited by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service as designated manatee hospitals. Your visit funds the care of these sick and injured manatees and other rescued wildlife.

The Florida manatee was recently reclassified as “Threatened” (Previously “Endangered”), but the species is far from recovered. They still need all of the protection and support we can provide. “Not endangered” does not mean “not in danger”. If you are a Florida resident, please always vote for legislation that protects and benefits manatees. You can learn more about the Manatee Rescue and Rehabilitation Partnership here: public.wildtracks.org

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Aside from being accomplished architects and artists, many bowerbirds are also skilled mimics.  Male satin bowerbirds will imitate the calls of other local birds during their courtship displays.  Even more startling, MacGregror’s bowerbirds have been heard imitating human speech, pigs grunting, and even the sound of nearby waterfalls.