end of world war ii

Kilroy Was Here!

He’s engraved in stone in the National World War II Memorial in Washington, DC – back in a small alcove where very few people have seen it. For the WWII generation, this will bring back memories. For younger folks, it’s a bit of trivia that is an intrinsic part of American history and legend.

Anyone born between 1913 to about 1950, is very familiar with Kilroy. No one knew why he was so well known….but everybody seemed to get into it. It was the fad of its time!

          At the National World War II Memorial in Washington, DC

So who was Kilroy?

In 1946 the American Transit Association, through its radio program, “Speak to America,” sponsored a nationwide contest to find the real Kilroy….now a larger-than-life legend of just-ended World War II….offering a prize of a real trolley car to the person who could prove himself to be the genuine article.

Almost 40 men stepped forward to make that claim, but only James Kilroy from Halifax, Massachusetts, had credible and verifiable evidence of his identity.

“Kilroy” was a 46-year old shipyard worker during World War II (1941-1945) who worked as a quality assurance checker at the Fore River Shipyard in Quincy, Massachusetts (a major shipbuilder for the United States Navy for a century until the 1980s).  

His job was to go around and check on the number of rivets completed. (Rivets held ships together before the advent of modern welding techniques.) Riveters were on piece work wages….so they got paid by the rivet. He would count a block of rivets and put a check mark in semi-waxed lumber chalk (similar to crayon), so the rivets wouldn’t be counted more than once.

                                     A warship hull with rivets

When Kilroy went off duty, the riveters would surreptitiously erase the mark. Later, an off-shift inspector would come through and count the rivets a second time, resulting in double pay for the riveters!

One day Kilroy’s boss called him into his office. The foreman was upset about unusually high wages being “earned” by riveters, and asked him to investigate. It was then he realized what had been going on. 

The tight spaces he had to crawl in to check the rivets didn’t lend themselves to lugging around a paint can and brush, so Kilroy decided to stick with the waxy chalk. He continued to put his check mark on each job he inspected, but added KILROY WAS HERE! in king-sized letters next to the check….and eventually added the sketch of the guy with the long nose peering over the fence….and that became part of the Kilroy message.

   Kilroy’s original shipyard inspection “trademark” during World War II

Once he did that, the riveters stopped trying to wipe away his marks.

Ordinarily the rivets and chalk marks would have been covered up with paint. With World War II on in full swing, however, ships were leaving the Quincy Yard so fast that there wasn’t time to paint them. As a result, Kilroy’s inspection "trademark” was seen by thousands of servicemen who boarded the troopships the yard produced.

His message apparently rang a bell with the servicemen, because they picked it up and spread it all over the European and the Pacific war zones.

Before war’s end, “Kilroy” had been here, there, and everywhere on the long hauls to Berlin and Tokyo. 

To the troops outbound in those ships, however, he was a complete mystery; all they knew for sure was that someone named Kilroy had “been there first.” As a joke, U.S. servicemen began placing the graffiti wherever they landed, claiming it was already there when they arrived.

As World War II wore on, the legend grew. Underwater demolition teams routinely sneaked ashore on Japanese-held islands in the Pacific to map the terrain for coming invasions by U.S. troops (and thus, presumably, were the first GI’s there). On one occasion, however, they reported seeing enemy troops painting over the Kilroy logo!

Kilroy became the U.S. super-GI who had always “already been” wherever GIs went. It became a challenge to place the logo in the most unlikely places imaginable. (It is said to now be atop Mt. Everest, the Statue of Liberty, the underside of the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, and even scrawled in the dust on the moon by the American astronauts who walked there between 1969 and 1972.

In 1945, as World War II was ending, an outhouse was built for the exclusive use of Allied leaders Harry Truman, Joseph Stalin, and Winston Churchill at the Potsdam Conference. It’s first occupant was Stalin, who emerged and asked his aide (in Russian), “Who is Kilroy?”

To help prove his authenticity in 1946, James Kilroy brought along officials from the shipyard and some of the riveters. He won the trolley car….which he attached to the Kilroy home and used to provide living quarters for six of the family’s nine children….thereby solving what had become an acute housing crisis for the Kilroys.

                     The new addition to the Kilroy family home.

                                        *          *          *          *

And the tradition continues into the 21st century…

In 2011 outside the now-late-Osama Bin Laden’s hideaway house in Abbottabad, Pakistan….shortly after the al-Qaida-terrorist was killed by U.S. Navy SEALs

>>Note: The Kilroy graffiti on the southwest wall of the Bin Laden compound pictured above was real (not digitally altered with Microsoft Paint, as postulated by some). The entire compound was leveled in 2012 for redevelopment by a Pakistani company as an amusement park….and to avoid it becoming a shrine to Bin Laden’s nefarious memory.

                                         *          *          *          *

A personal note….

My Dad’s trademark signature on cards, letters and notes to my sisters and I for the first 50 or so years of our lives (until we lost him to cancer) was to add the image of “Kilroy" at the end. We kids never ceased to get a thrill out of this….even as we evolved into adulthood. 

To this day, the “Kilroy” image brings back a vivid image of my awesome Dad into my head….and my heart!

Dad: This one’s for you!

During the United States Red Scare after the end of World War II, the term “premature anti-fascist” came into currency to describe Americans who had strongly agitated or worked against fascism, such as by fighting for the Republicans in the Spanish Civil War, before fascism was seen as a proximate and existential threat to the United States. The implication was that such persons were Communists or Communist sympathizers whose loyalty to the United States was suspect.

there’s nothing new under the sun

IMPORTANT EVENTS AND THEIR DATES IN MODERN EUROPEAN HISTORY

1453  Constantinople is sacked by Muslim forces

1488  Bartolomeu Diaz rounds the Cape of Good Hope

1492  Columbus encounters the Americas (God, Glory and Gold.)

1517  Martin Luther’s posting of the 95 Theses

1520  Diet of Worms declares Martin Luther an outlaw

1524-1525  The Peasants’ Revolt takes place in Germany

1534  Act of Supremacy passed in England → Henry VIII becomes head of the Anglican Church

1545  Council of Trent begins The Counter Reformation

1555  Peace of Augsburg (cuius regio, eius religio →whose region, his religion)

1585-1589  War of the Three Henries in France

1588  Spanish Armada destroyed by the English and “The Protestant Wind”

1603  Elizabeth I Dies → Tudor Dynasty Ends and the Stuart Dynasty Begins

1618-1648  The Thirty Years War (Treaty of Westphalia ends the war in 1648)

1642-1646  English Civil War (Roundheads vs. the Cavaliers)

1649  Charles I is executed → Oliver Cromwell begins his rule

1660  Stuart Restoration in England through Charles II

1688-1689  Glorious Revolution in England→ William and Mary of Orange replace James II and sign the English Bill of Rights

1643-1715  Era of Louis XIV  The Sun King (l’etat c’est moi)

1689-1725  Reign of Peter the Great in Russia

1756-1763  The Seven Years War

1789-1799  Era of the French Revolution (Radical Stage → late 1792-1795)

1799  Napoleon comes to power

1805-1815  Napoleonic Wars are waged

1814-1815  The Congress of Vienna meets (Main principles: Legitimacy, Conservatism, Compensation & Balance of Power)

1819  Peterloo Massacre in England

1830  Belgian Independence

1832  Reform Bill in England Passed

1848  Revolutions break out across Western Europe (France, Austria, Italy and Germany)

1861  Serfs emancipated in Russia under Alexander II

1870-1871  Germany and Italy Unification

1884-1885  Berlin Conference is held (“Scramble for Africa”)

1894  Tsar Nicholas II comes to power in Russia (the last of the Romanovs)

1905  Sunday Bloody Revolution in Russia → “The Dress Rehearsal”

1914  Archduke Franz Ferdinand is assassinated → WWI starts

1917  March and November (Bolshevik) Revolutions in Russia

1918  Treaty of Brest-Litovsk is signed →Russia withdraws from war

1918  WWI ends

1919  Treaty of Versailles is signed

1918-1921  Russian Civil War (Reds vs. Whites)

1922  Mussolini comes to power in Italy and establishes the 1st Fascist government

1922  Russia officially becomes known as the USSR (Union of Soviet Socialist Republics) → The Soviet Union

1923  Adolf Hitler leads the Beer Hall Putsch in Germany

1924  Lenin dies

1928  Stalin is firmly entrenched as the leader of the Soviet Union → begins the first of several 5 year plans

1929  Stock Market Crash in the US → The Great Depression begins

1933  Hitler comes to power in Germany

1938  Munich Conference (Peace in our time→Neville Chamberlain)

1939  World War II starts with Germany’s invasion of Poland

1945  World War II ends (V-E Day → May 8, 1945 and V-J Day → August 15, 1945)

1945  First session of the United Nations is held

1945-1989  Cold War (U.S. vs. S.U. begins and begins to end in Poland)

POST WW II  Decolonization → European colonies become independent

1946  Winston Churchill gives the “Iron Curtain” speech

1948-1949 Operation Vittles→the Berlin Airlift

1949  USSR successfully tests first atomic bomb

1951  European Coal and Steel Community formed (sounds like the Zollverein)

1953  Stalin dies and is succeeded by Nikita Khrushchev → destalinization begins

1954  French forces defeated in French-Indochina at Dien Bien Phu

1956  Hungarian revolt against the Soviet Union → it is crushed by the Soviets

1957  Rome Treaty is signed → The European Economic Community (EEC) is created = Common Market

1957  Sputnik is launched by the Soviet Union → the first space satellite

1958  The fifth Republic is born in France and Charles de Gaulle becomes President

1961  Berlin Wall built → dividing East and West Berlin

1961  Soviet Yuri Gagarin becomes the first man in space

1962  Cuban Missile Crisis → 90 miles off the coast of Florida

1963  Betty Friedan’s The Feminine Mystique is published

1964  Leonid Brezhnev becomes leader of the Soviet Union

1966  Under President Charles de Gaulle, France withdraws from the common NATO military command

1968  “Prague Spring” occurs in Czechoslovakia → it is crushed by the Soviets

1968  Student revolt in France (Paris)

1978  Pole Karol Wojtyla elected Pope → Pope John Paul II → 1st non-Italian in 455 years

1979  Margaret Thatcher becomes the first female Prime Minister of England (“The Iron Lady”) (Mags loathes no one more than this heinous twat)

1979  The Soviet Union invades Afghanistan (eventually becomes their own “little Vietnam”)

1980  1st independent labor union in the Soviet Bloc formed  “Solidarity” led by Lech Walesa of Poland

1980  Ronald Reagan elected President of the US (calls the Soviet Union an “evil empire”)

1985  Gorbachev becomes Soviet leader (implements policies of perestroika and glasnost)

1986  Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant accident in the Soviet Union (specifically the Ukraine)

1989  Berlin Wall comes down

1989  The “Velvet Revolution” occurs in Czechoslovakia → Vaclav Havel becomes President

1989  The Soviet Union withdraws its forces from Afghanistan

1989  Romanian leader Nicolai Ceausescu is overthrown and killed

1990  Lech Walesa becomes President of Poland

1990  East Germany and West Germany reunify into one Germany

1990  The first McDonalds opens in Russia

1991  Attempted coup attempt in the Soviet Union → The Soviet Union begins to disintegrate

1991  Boris Yeltsin becomes President of Russia → former 15 republics of the Soviet Union form the Commonwealth of Independent States (C.I.S.)

1991  Yugoslavia begins to break apart

1992  Maastricht Treaty signed

1997  Tony Blair becomes Prime Minister of England → 1st Labor Party leader in 18 years

1999  Eurodollar becomes the single currency of the European Union (EU)

anonymous asked:

bsd really got me into learning about the rl authors, but ive been having trouble finding stuff about the japanese authors. do you have any recommendations for where i could start?

Ahhhh, I’m flattered you came to ask here for suggestions!  I don’t think I’m the best person to ask, honestly, but I’ll do my best to help! Since you said it was BSD that got you interested, most of my recommendations will be from the Japanese authors featured in the series~

Short Stories

This is only to get you started, a bit of a sampler for what some of the literary greats have to offer.

Rashomon & In a Grove by Akutagawa Ryuunosuke

– Akutagawa is the master of short stories, so there can be no better starter when it comes to dipping your toes in when it comes to Japanese literature. Most of Akutagawa’s works deal with exposing the egotism of man and the flaws of the human spirit. His writing may be elegant and refined, but to others it comes off as unfeeling and cerebral; you’ll have to find out for yourself where you stand.

Beneath the Cherry Trees by Kajii Motojirou

– “There are bodies buried beneath the cherry trees!” This line from one of Kajii’s most famous works is often quoted, probably because it associates the ephemeral sakura with the grotesque. Sakaguchi Ango also wrote a story with the same title, but I find Kajii’s to be the more memorable one between the two.

Separate Ways by Higuchi Ichiyou

– BSD may have you fooled, but Higuchi is actually an extremely popular literary figure in Japan, due to both the quality of her work and her all too short life. “Separate Ways” is quite a short read, but it has a heartbreaking realism most stories twice its length can’t even hope to touch.

The Human Chair by Edogawa Ranpo

– And now, we enter the surreal. Though more known for being the originator of modern mystery stories in Japan, Edogawa was also considered a master of gothic horror. Be warned, this story can be disturbing so skip this if you have a faint heart! (As an aside, Ito Junji put a spin on the tale and published a oneshot inspired by “The Human Chair“ a few years back.)

Keep reading

The way Gatiss delivers “What do you mean, one?” breaks my heart.

Because they really did think that the Great War would end wars–in fact, they called it the War to End All Wars, but in the end it wasn’t. In the end it allowed for humans to invent increasingly innovative ways to murder each other. (There’s a reason that Mordor is ash and mud and thick choking smoke, a no-man’s-land of churned earth where nothing grows, where Sam and Frodo miserably slog through a ruined and blasted landscape.) 

And, in the end, the Great War’s resolution directly sowed seeds that would ripen into World War II. (And on and on and on. Humans solve one war and lay the foundation for the next; we simply seem hellbent on waging war on each other over anything and everything.)

And Twelve’s response is to apologize, to say ‘Spoilers’, and he looks downright glum about even momentarily pricking the bubble of hope this World War I soldier has. And then One goes “Enough of this” and we see character juxtapositions already.

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Victory Day (9 May)

Victory Day is a holiday that commemorates the victory of the Soviet Union over Nazi Germany in the Great Patriotic War. It was first inaugurated in the 16 republics of the Soviet Union, following the signing of the German Instrument of Surrender late in the evening on 8 May 1945 (after midnight, thus on 9 May Moscow Time). The Soviet government announced the victory early on 9 May after the signing ceremony in Berlin. Though the official inauguration occurred in 1945 the holiday became a non-labour day only in 1965 and only in certain Soviet republics.

In East Germany, 8 May was observed as “Liberation Day” from 1950 to 1966, and was celebrated again on the 40th anniversary in 1985. In 1975, a Soviet-style “Victory Day” was celebrated on 9 May. Since 2002, the German state of Mecklenburg-Vorpommern has observed a commemoration day known as the “Day of Liberation from National Socialism, and the End of the Second World War”.

After regaining their independence from the Soviet Union, the Baltic countries now commemorate the end of World War II on 8 May, the Victory in Europe Day. [Read More]

Frank-Walter Steinmeier Next President of Germany

Today, February 12, 2017, Frank-Walter Steinmeier was elected by the Federal Convention (Bundesversammlung) as the next president of Germany. He will assume office on March 18, 2017.

Steinmeier, member of the SPD, was the candidate of the Great Coalition consisting of CDU, CSU, and SPD currently governing Germany. He was also supported by the Green Party and the FDP.

Dr. Frank-Walter Steinmeier grew up in a carpenter’s family in the rural Lippe area in North-Rhine-Westphalia. He studied law and political sciences in Gießen and received a doctoral degree in law in 1991. He was hired at the office of the prime minister of the state of Lower Saxony, Gerhard Schröder, in Hannover, where he quickly advanced his career. He followed Gerhard Schröder after his appointment as chancellor to Berlin, where he soon became chief of the Chancellor’s Office. In this position, he was one of the driving forces of the Agenda 2010 reforms, which are generally said to be the foundations of Germany’s current economical success, but were (and still are) controversially discussed with regards to their impact on social affairs and the coherence of the German society.

After Angela Merkel assumed Chancellorship of a Great Coalition in 2005, Steinmeier was appointed as foreign minister. In 2007, he became vice-chancellor. He was appointed again as foreign minister in the third cabinet of Angela Merkel and resigned in January 2017 after he was nominated as the joint presidential candidate of the Great Coalition.

In 2010, Steinmeier donated a kidney to his wife, Elke Büdenbender, to save her life.


Unlike in many other states, the president of Germany, as the official head of the state, has a mostly ceremonial and representative role. The duties of the office involve:

  • to represent Germany in the world under international law (signing international contracts, accrediting German diplomats, receiving international leaders and letters of accreditation of foreign diplomats, etc.)
  • to propose a chancellor candidate to the German parliament
  • to appoint and dismiss the chancellor (after parliamental vote) and the ministers of the federal government; the president does not have the right to reject the resignation of a chancellor
  • to appoint and dismiss high federal officials and military (requiring counter-signature of chancellor or the relevant minister)
  • to regularly meet with the chancellor and the ministers for confidential consultations
  • to sign and promulgate the law, with the right to reject his signature (happened only eight times so far)
  • to dissolve the Federal Diet (Bundestag, German parliament) under certain circumstances
  • to declare war, after the the government has determined a state of defense
  • to exercise the power of pardon on the federal level (but he has no right to issue an amnesty)
  • to declare a state of legislative emergency by request of the cabinet if no chancellor could be elected. During this period, bills submitted by the government become law after his signature even if the federal diet rejects them, but the Federal Council (upper chamber of parliament representing the sixteen states) has to approve them. Legislative emergency does non suspend basic human rights, nor does it give the executive branch exceptional power. Legislative emergency has never been declared so far.
  • to assume the patronage over projects and initiatives that have a positive impact on the German society. He is the regular patron of the German red cross and the German maritime search and rescue sevice.
  • to decide upon the national symbols after counter-signature of the chancellor
  • to occasion state ceremonies
  • to confer the Order of Merit of the Federal Republic of Germany and other minor decorations

The Federal President does not have the right to issue decrees without counter-signature of a member of the Federal Government; that means that he cannot execute political power against the will of the government, with the sole exception of the strictly regulated state of legislative emergency.

The Federal President, committed to political neutrality, usually acts by the power of the word. He is independent of daily politics and free to set his topics. This way, a number of presidents have by speeches initiated public debates that materialized in law some time later. Notable examples are the speech of Richard von Weizsäcker on the occasion of the 40th anniversary of the end of world war II, and the “Ruck-Rede” (”Jerk Speech”) by Roman Herzog. The former speech substantially shaped Germany’s current culture of remembrance, the latter initiated the debate that eventually led to the Agenda 2010 reforms by the government of Gerhard Schröder.

In case the office of the president falls vacant, the president of the Federal Council (Bundesrat) temporarily assumes the duties of the office until a new president is elected, which should be done within 30 days.

The president enjoys immunity from prosecution and cannot be voted out of office. The Federal Diet can revoke the immunity in case the president is offended of willfully violating the law. The Federal constitutional court has then to determine whether the president is guilty of the offense and has the only authority to remove the president from the office.

The president resides in Bellevue Palace in Berlin and has a second office in Hammerschmidt Villa in Bonn. His car carries the number 0-1, and the aircraft carrying the president has the call sign German Air Force 001.

The president assumes a honorary godfathership for the seventh child of a family. He helps German artists in need by a single donation or by giving the a honorarium. He offers his congratulations for special anniversaries, such as the hundredth birthday of a German citizen.

A 25 foot sculpture portraying Alfred Eisenstaedt’s photograph of a sailor kissing a nurse stands in Times Square to celebrate and remember the end of World War II. Couples have gathered to reenact the famous kiss.  

The Laotian Civil War

Lasting from 1953 to 1975, the Laotian Civil War was fought between the Communist Pathet Lao and the Royal Lao Government. Before 1953, Laos was part of Indochina and nominally under the control of the French Empire. But the reality was the French never got full control back after Indochina was conquered by the Japanese during World War II. So World War II ends, and the French sponsor a guerrilla war to retake control, while the nominal king proclaimed an end to French protectorate status while quietly supporting the French return, and a national liberation movement starts to take shape around some other Laotian princes, supported to a degree by the high percentage of Vietnamese living in urban Laos.

Eventually, the French gave up, leaving the country in 1953 and officially giving power to the Royal Lao government. The civil war got started immediately. It was treated as a proxy war by the great powers, with North Vietnam, Russia, and China supporting the Pathet Lao, and South Vietnam and the United States supporting the Royal Lao Government. At the time, however, the Laotian Civil War was largely ignored in favor of the Vietnam War which was happening at the same time. In the end the communists won, and their party continues to control the country. 

Today, the Laotian Civil War is usually known by the nickname it was given in the 1960s by the CIA – “The Secret War.”

youtube

Women Artists and Postwar Abstraction | HOW TO SEE the art movement with MoMA curator Starr Figura

Many people recognize names like Pollock and de Kooning, but far fewer know of women abstract artists like Lee Krasner, Magdalena Abakanowicz, and Lee Bontecou, who made their own space in an often resistant art world.

MoMA curator Starr Figura introduces MoMA’s new exhibition Making Space which shines a spotlight on the stunning achievements of women artists between the end of World War II and the start of the Feminist movement in the late 1960s.

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Quirks: The idiosyncrasies of DBK

U.S triple Grenade Pouch 

Otherwise known “No, that is not Dylan’s half-arsed job of tying his boot lace”  Hopefully this post will help dispel the untied boot laces misinformation (though sometimes admittedly cute) that is still working the perpetuated Tumblr rumor circuit ;) 

From a distance in photos and video, some have automatically assumed that Dylan was just a lazy ass  on 4/20 and didn’t bother to lace his combat boot’s all the way up his shin so that the boot appears to be dangling all flappy-loose as he lumbers about. But nope.  While Dyl made not have given a shit about much as he’d be dead within the hour, it was more of a matter of one of a few of his uniform malfunctions than carelessness.  The reality here is that his right shin/ankle in question looks messed up because he has his U.S. army green triple grenade pouch sketchily attached to it

The U.S. Triple Grenade pouch was used from the end of World War II until the 70’s. It is meant to carry six grenades total so is cumbersome no matter how its worn. It just wasn’t very well designed. It appears in all 3 of his gear sketches, with the first two pouches on the top listed as holding extra (“xt”) shotgun shells or bullets (the order is switched in one of them) and the bottom pouch as “poison” in one of the sketches. 

In the basement tape “transcripts”;  Dylan “attaches black suspenders to his pants and also attaches a tan ammo type pouch to his belt or suspenders & a green canvas pouch to his right shin.” 

Given how sloppy the pouch adheres to Dylan’s leg - half peeling away from his right leg - he likely jerry-rigged the pouch with a shoelace or something tied to the wire.   It’s just another little detail that makes this particular type of pouch and the way he wore it even stranger.  Why Dylan elected to strap it to his boot when it didn’t fit securely to begin with is anyone’s guess.  Based on his sketches, he seems firmly set on it being part of his aesthetic- no matter how impractical it may have been from the get-go when he tried it on for size in the “NBK fashion show” the two had in the Basement Tapes.  Dylan needed a place to store extra ammo and apparently he didn’t come up with any alternative idea for that.   It must have been a bit of an annoyance to him the day he was in action because it looks as though he’s partially dragging it around - half detaching from his leg. He may have even had to stopped at certain points of massacre to check it and fix it more securely so that it wouldn’t fall off completely as he walked or ran.

The Triple Grenade Pouch is specifically drawn on all of his gear sketches so he conceptualized and envisioned this with his fantasy ‘uniform’ atleast a few months prior. In the end, the pouch was more of a nuisance in reality than a useful, practical battle accessory.  In the sketches above, he slightly makes modifications on what goes where in the pockets: the first two pouches was to contain ‘XT’ shorthand for ‘extra’ 9mm bullets or shotgun shells. In one of the sketches, he fantasizes that the 3rd pouch pocket will be for “poison”..which likely was never included.  It’s was simply was that he liked the idea of having various suicide methods at his disposal in case the cops were closing in on them.  He also stuck a bullet in his boot - which of course, was useless without a shell or clip. But it was the idea for him that he was ‘prepared’ for his Death Day. 

In the two photos above, you can see Dylan’s actual grenade pouch as well as his trench and the other gear of the two in that glass display case of the 2004 Columbine Evidence Exhibit. This exhibit was permitted to showcase one time only as part of Jeffco. Sadly, most of this evidence has now been destroyed as far back as 2011, if we can entirely believe Jeffco’s claims..

Royal Tutor Encyclopedia

So if you watch Oushitsu Kyoushi Haine (also know as ‘The Royal Tutor’), maybe you’ll start to think which country is the main inspiration for the mangaka’s Granzreich. In some of the manga’s bonus features it is revealed that the Austro-Hungarian Empire, my country and Austria’s 19th century alliance gives the most of the details to the story. Today I will show you the parallel points of the reality and the fiction based on the first four episodes.

What we know that the kingdom of Granzreich is basically similar with Austria (in German ‘Österreich’ - ‘österr’ means Austrian) and their capital is Wiener (’Wien’ in German or ‘Vienna’ in English is the capital of Austria). Wiener’s popularity in the time of the show were 1,300,000 people, which is similar to Vienna’s popularity around the early 1900′s. (1,700,000 people if the Wikipedia says right things.)

And what things are the current parallels?

1. Royal Crest

The Granzreich family crest was based on the Habsbourg family crest - they are the royal family of Austria from the middle ages to the end of the World War II. Althought the crown on the top is a little bit different - that’s the crown from the Austro-Hungarian Empire’s Crest.

2. The Royal Palace

This was based on the Hofburg Palace, Vienna. This was the first royal palace in the town, but Franz Joseph I, the emperor of the Austro-Hungarian Empire built a bigger palace at the end of the town (Schönbrunn Palace) and the first metro line, because he likes the calm life but hates carriages. Now this is a governmental building and also works as a museum.

3. The Royals

Franz Joseph I was the main inspiration of the royal prince’s appearances and clothing. The black dress is from his youth and the blue, royal dress is in the early 1900s - he sat on the throne almost 70 years, from 1848 to 1916.

4. The Vain Princess

This is also based on a true story. Marie Antoinette, child of the Austrian and Hungarian Empress Marie Theresa (1717-1780) was married to the royal family of France as the wife of King Louis the XVI. They lived in big luxury when their people were starving, so in 1789 the france revolution was started and then she killed with the guillotine.

5. The Royal Capital

The places in the anime were also exist - the Ring (’RingStraße’), the Royal Opera House and the Town Hall. Here are my pictures about these buildings.

+ The Royal Puppy

Do you wonder which species is the royal dog? It’s a ‘komondor’, a Hungarian shepherd dog. Their fur also mop-like than the puli’s (Mark Zuckerberg’s Beast is also a hungarian dog, a ‘puli’ or mop dog), but their height are bigger to guard the cows or horses.

ついさっき小説をすっかり読み終わりました。第二次世界大戦の最後の頃、雍子は朝鮮から逃避して日本へ帰国の話です。日本語がよく上達した気がします。多い単語や漢字とかを習いました。本の全ての言葉がわかるのに、私が衝撃に受けます。でも読むのが難しったです!シェークスピアの作品を読むみたいに多い単語を調べなくていけなかった、ただい一つのページを読むのに時間がかかりました。でも、私の改善が発揮します。他の本を読み始めると、以前より辞書で調べる回が少なくなった、もっと早く読むのはできます。自分を誇りに思います。

I just finished the novel a while ago. It’s about Yoko escaping from Korea returning to Japan around the end of World War II. I feel like my Japanese has improved. I learned lots of vocab and kanji. I’m shocked I understand all the words in the book. But reading was hard! Like it was reading Shakespeare’s work I had to look up a lot of vocab and reading just one page took time. But my improvement is showing. When I started reading another book I looked up in the dictionary less than before and I can read faster. I’m proud of myself.