end of the villain's point of view

I want to talk about Star Wars in the context of left-wing politics for a second. It’s actually really good, maybe even better than we realize. It might actually be the best massively popular mass media franchise of the modern era - not because it is undeniably really good entertainment, but because it actually attempts to say something meaningful and positive about rebellion and change.

Many left-wing writers and critical theorists have written about a general problem that plagues mass media. In many stories, the only real movers or changers to the status quo are the villains. In other words, the task of the hero is to merely uphold the status quo against some deviant force that wants to change it. You can see this in works like Harry Potter, where the ultimate goal is really just the defeat of Voldemort and the preservation of the way things are. People that want to change things drastically are either laughed at (like Hermione with the house-elves) or are themselves villainous. This same dynamic is also true in many comic books and comic book movies - The Avengers aren’t looking to fundamentally change the structure of society. That’s what the villains want. The Avengers are supposed to defend the earth from change, not instigate change themselves.

This dynamic points to a sort of end-of-history view of things, where liberal democracy is the best anybody can hope for, and anybody attempting to change it is either worthy of derision or villainous. It propagandizes the audience to be more happy with the way things are, because every possible alternative is worse.

The other side to this particular narrative is the straight dystopia, where liberal democracy has somehow been lost, and the hope of the hero is to restore it. Even though this narrative takes a different approach, it still points to the same thing. This narrative acts as a warning to a similar end - “imagine how bad things could be, you really ought to be happy with the way things are.”

But then there is Star Wars - a story that takes place in a galaxy far far away, but is perhaps more relevant to us on earth than any other mass media franchise. In Star Wars, the heroes are the Rebellion, a rag-tag group of people fighting against an evil Empire. Right from the beginning, the changers are the heroes, not the villains. It’s the heroes that shake things up, or in many cases blow things up, and the goal of the villains is the preservation of the status quo. That’s a huge flip to the problematic narrative right out of the gate.

An argument could be made that Star Wars falls into the dystopia trap, and that the end goal of the Rebellion is merely the restoration of liberal democracy - but two huge things challenge that narrative. In the first place, Star Wars is not presented as a dystopia. In most dystopias, the dystopian environment itself is the central narrative. We are told in great detail just how bad the government is, and how bad they have made the world. Star Wars doesn’t do that. In fact, the amount of time spent on the Empire and its inner workings is minimal. The central narrative to Star Wars is instead the rebels themselves - particularly the three central heroes - and their personal journey and interactions. Their personal acts of rebellion are explained in far greater detail than any Imperial actions. Star Wars could be seen to celebrate rebellion itself, in this way. We aren’t bogged down with an explanation for why opposing the Empire is the right course of action. We are simply made to believe that resisting power itself, in any capacity, is good and should be done.

In the second place, the prequel trilogy actually did a really good job of deconstructing the trappings of liberal democracy. In the prequel trilogy, it’s the Republic that grants emergency powers to the Supreme Chancellor, essentially creating the Empire. It’s the Republic that willingly sacrificed thousands of clone troopers to the scourges of war. It’s the Republic that financed both sides of the civil war. It’s the Republic that let liberty die with thunderous applause. After the prequel trilogy, if the end goal of the Rebellion is just the restoration of that same type of Republic, the audience would not be satisfied. We believe that the Rebellion is fighting for something greater. We have to.

For this reason, the current sequel trilogy actually plays a pretty central role in the interpretation of the series. Depending on what the Resistance ultimately ends up creating, the series could come to a fantastic and satisfying conclusion, or it could stumble into the same trappings of other mass media franchises. I’m not sure if I have total faith - but I honestly have more than I normally would, just because Star Wars has been so comparatively fantastic so far. And Rogue One kept with the tradition, portraying a firmly left-wing insurgency, willing to use whatever means necessary.

That’s the tradition of Star Wars - the heroes are the rebels, the changers, the movers. We’re actually here to create something radically better. Come join us in the galaxy far far away of our wildest dreams.

Originally posted by geekybasket

So like, I have opinions about how shows should structure themselves. Specifically like adventure-y, action-y shows like the Hundo. It’s built upon my years and years and years of watching shit like Buffy, Farscape, Charmed, Roswell, etc. (Micheal Geurin ILY)

This is basically my Grand Plan for when I inevitably am given a CW show. Inevitably. You know I’m for cereal because I’m going full adult capitalization on this bitch. 

Overall Show Structure

Overview 

First of all, I think a show should know how long it wants to run. There should be an end date in mind rather than letting it just go on forever until it dies in a last, pathetic choke for relevance. Yeah, lookin’ to you SPN. As far as I’m concerned 3, 5, and 7 seasons are the best options for intended length but I think an argument can be made for other choices. 

I’m going to focus on a 5 season structure because it’s the one I think is best from both a story telling and fandom supporting stance. So, lets brush quickly on why I think 3 and 7 seasons are also good options.

3 Season Run

This form of the story is clear, concise and focused. There’s nothing extraneous in a short run like this and I think there’s a lot to be said for clean story telling like this. In a 3 season run season 1 shows us who characters are and what their relationships are; season 2 tests those relationships and asks characters to stretch themselves; season 3 breaks those relationships and the tensions first overcome in season 1 as the tearing points. 

7 Season Run

Telling a story for this long is a big ask. A lot changes in that many seasons and honestly, I think this is the longest possible run before a show loses coherency (crime procedurals can escape this but I think they’re a unique breed). The 7 season show follows the same structure as the 5 season run but the last 2 seasons pull from a dangled bit of information in season 3. This’ll make a little more sense as we dig into my season break down. You’re also almost certainly looking at some pretty big central cast choices by the end of 7 seasons.

5 Season Run

Okay, so my personal favourite, the 5 season run. I think this is the best length for a show of this type, action adventure stories that are ultimately about people. In a 5 season run you build characters, break them down, and let them reform themselves. 5 seasons is enough to really explore the depths of characters with time and focus but not so long that you end up repeating personal stories in clumsy ways.  In broad brush strokes seasons 1 and 2 set up who are characters are and what their relationships will be; season 3 picks away and their sense of self and leaves them at their lowest point in it’s finale; seasons 4 and 5 build them back up, reaffirm who they are and why it is that they’re doing this. 

Season By Season Breakdown 

Season 1

A good first season is a hard one. You need a small, tight story with small, personal stakes. This is where you set up the core of your show (hopefully the central cast that will carry all the way to the end of your run) and tell us who we’re rooting for. We’re given 3 or 4 characters who are going to be at the heart of our show and we need to learn who they are. It’s important that they have interpersonal tension and that by the end of the season they have a stable, working relationship.

This is also when you want to keep the stakes low. No one saves the world in the first season. Where do you go from there? The first season is about personal danger and personal stakes. We shouldn’t even meet the real antagonist this season. Our plucky heroes duke it out with lackies and maybe a lieutenant, a second or third in command. We hear about but never meet the Big Bad. The season ends with the  heroes defeating the small scale. For Buffy that was overcoming a prophecy of her own death. For the Hundo that was repelling an attacking force from their home. Small scale, personal. It shows us who our characters are but doesn’t ask to much of them.

Season 2

All those relationships we set up in season 1 are going to be tested. We’re going to meet the Big Bad who was calling the shots last season and we’re going to take a swing at them. But season 2 also leads directly from season 1, maybe there’s a time jump but it’s short. Maybe there’s a new direction but it is born out of the ashes of the season 1 finale hook.  

Our core group expands, they stretch their wings and test what their relationships do under the stress of higher odds. Season 2 feels pressure on a bigger scale, the core group aren’t the only ones at stake now. Maybe it’s family and friends, or their town. The Big Bad has seen that they really are a threat and is playing for keeps. In a fatal show we should suffer a loss that hurts in the final episodes. There is a victory but it’s not without it’s losses 

Season 3

We get a departure from our first two seasons. Season 3 can take a time jump, it doesn’t have to fall directly on the heels of the second season. But something late in season 1 comes back up. A good way to play this is to take the antagonist from a two episode arch shortly before the conclusion of season 1 and make them a big deal. This is a good time to make the antagonist here someone with whom the Big Bad in the first two seasons had their own tension with. The heroes do this antagonist a favour when they take out the Big Bad but it proves that they’re a force to be reckoned with. 

This is a good season to narrow down, break a couple of those relationships. Swinging at the Big Bad last season cost our heroes something. In season 3 we know that heroes don’t have plot armor, the Good Guys don’t always walk away. The loss of a friend and the knowledge that this probably wont be the last loss weighs heavily on our heroes. They handle it differently and it starts to rupture the fabric of the group. Tension in the season is born of a question of how or if our group will stick together.

This is a good season to have one of our heroes play on the dark side a little. Maybe our new antagonist isn’t totally wrong about the way they view the world. 

The end of this season should see this antagonist dead and our heroes tentatively recommitted to the cause. A Pyrrhic victory at the conclusion of this season can make sure our heroes don’t want those deaths to be in vain. 

Season 4

At some point in first half of the first season a lacky  mentioned some Ultimate Villain that our first Big Bad was afraid of. Yeah, that mother fucker is back in the game. Or heroes are only tentatively recommitted to the cause, they’re as dark as we’ve ever seen them and they’re not all comfortable with the things they’ve done to get here. So season 4 is going to make them earn it. This is a season where they’re asked to prove that they are hero types, to make hard calls, to stretch themselves. 

But we also get victories. Someone they helped in the first or second season comes back as a guest star, is involved in their lives in a positive way because they helped them. This is where we get to see our heroes really commit, really see that they’re a force for good.

At the end of season 4 the Ultimate Villain isn’t defeated but they know what they have to do. They have achieved the first half of defeating this villain, maybe it’s securing a Magic Item, or a certain location, maybe it’s just figuring out who the fuck the villain actually is and what that means. But at the end of season 4 our heroes are poised to take their step at the Ultimate Villain. This is where we have our “I aim to misbehave” speech. Going into the fifth season our heroes are hard, are focused, and are ready to take no prisoners. 

Season 5

We should get a victory march. Season 5 should be an absolutely adoring ode to why we love these characters. It shouldn’t be easy for them, hell no. It should cost. We need one of the core group to die, absolutely. And die senselessly, die because the group make a stupid arrogant call because they’re the Heroes and they forgot what that can cost. Season 5 should pull away the arrogance that they learned in seasons 2, 3 and 4. By the end of season 5 they defeat the Ultimate Villain and walk out on top, but they do it by being the characters we first meet, the best versions of themselves. They have had all their rough edges buffed away by seasons of hardship and then they have the arrogance that winning gave them kicked out by hard, aching losses. But at the end of the finale the surviving cast should be their best selves, alive and well because they were the people that their friends could count on and because their relationships have helped make them the best they can be. 

So. Yeah. Someone give me a show. 

Guys, if you don’t like Villians being humanized and redeemed, I’m going to let you know early on, you probably don’t like Star Wars as a whole.   Honestly, this isn’t me trying to be rude, it’s just an honest truth to what Star Wars is and always has been.  The originals ended with Vader’s redemption.  The prequels were about humanizing Vader.  6 movies of this.   And though we don’t know the directions of the sequel trilogy, if you didn’t like the themes of the first 6 movies, I can almost guarantee you that it won’t change.

I know Star Wars is everywhere, and fun to be a part of, but honestly, if moral gray areas and looking at things from different points of view is something you aren’t into, I’m just reminding you that this is what Star Wars is and has been.

You can say everything is black and white, and there has been evil villains (Palpatine) and just pure good characters.   But even Luke has his dark moments.  I’m going to let you know, Han and Leia’s kid isn’t going to be the BG Boba Fett character who is just running around doing bad things with no growth.   

Dany is going to burn King’s Landing

I want to write about why I think the show is foreshadowing Dany burning King’s Landing next season. But I need to state some things first.

The fascinating thing about Daenerys is the fact she has immoral behavior, like almost every character in ASOIAF have, but the audience refuses to see her bad sides no matter what.
It’s great to see how you can tell a history and place a character as a hero no matter what but at the same time it’s kinda scary that the public can agree with such behavior.
She does a lot of terrible choices but people don’t think she has a big issue and shouldn’t be in a position of power, the massive reaction is just “hey, she has some minor flaws but nobody is perfect, okey? Leave her be”.

In the books Daenerys allows torture, which is a war crime. And at episode 5 Daenerys intentionally killed the Tarly’s, who were defeated in battle, were unarmed and were offering no resistance to the escort. The Tarly’s were in a  surrendering party resulted by a defeated in battle, and were intentionally killed by Daenerys. This is a war crime.  When Tyrion suggested to put them in cells, she declared “she would not put man in chains ” aka “not make prisoners” which is also a war crime. The offer she gave the remaining soldiers was “join me or die”. This is not a choice. This is a declaration that no quarter will be given and THIS IS  a war crime. When your enemies surrender you spare their lives and  take them as war prisoners you DO NOT execute them or demand them to fight against their remaining families and compatriotes cuz THIS IS NOT how a surrender works.
The show makes Daenerys commits war crimes intentionally even after people tell her it’s a bad idea. And the scary part is: the audience think is fine.
I’m pretty much convinced Daenerys is going to do a lot more than that in the future and the audience will buy it.

Since D&D have talked with GRRM about how the series is going to end, Daenerys tone in the series has changed a little bit. Since season 6, her “super badass” scenes turned into a “that’s nice but there’s something a little bit weird”. Her theme songs came from “I’m fighting to survive cuz I’m alone in the world and this is actually badass justice” to a more villain like kind of song, way darker and sinister. The camera angles and the points of view of her actions are different now, and the scenes that were exciting before became kinda sad and weird. If you rewatch the sack of Astapor at 3x4 and her battle against the Lannister army at 7x4 you will notice the huge difference of how they treated it.

So here’s where the tinfoil begins.

It’s about the Politics

I believe the Great War against the army of the dead will not be the final of GoT. GoT and ASOIAF are about the politics. The Night King wasn’t introduced till season 4 and he really became the major  treat only at season 5.. Daenerys’s dragons weren’t born till 10x1, they only had a real role at season 6 when Dany finally could control them and they were big enough to go to war. Many storylines still happen aside the whole magic. GoT is about the GAME OF THRONES. And that’s how the story will end. After the war is done, a political struggle will rise and things will get trick. The armies will be broken, Cersei will have the Golden Company at her back, Jon’s parentage will rise, the northerners will probably not fulfil Jon’s pledge to Daenerys, Dany may even lose one of her remaining dragons. Things will be very chaotic and chaos is a ladder.

The Great War is going to end at Winterfell.

Season 7 solved a large problem: how to destroy the army of the dead?
Conveniently if you kill the Night King, the wights die and the war is over. Simple as that.
Bran has been stated as a great threat to the Night King, almost as he’s the Night King true enemy. The Night King himself entered the cave to kill the last Three Eyed Raven and he seems to have a particular interest in Bran. The show has implied that Bran is waiting for him. And he’s waiting for him at Winterfell.
Daenerys is leading her army and remaining dragons to Winterfell and Jaime is much likely riding to Winterfell too.
Not only Sansa was featured preparing Winterfell for the war for the Dawn, but many characters have stated the importance of this castle.

Jon: “We can’t defend the north from the Walkers and the south from the Boltons. If we’re gonna survive we need Winterfell

Jon:“If they breach the Wall, the first two castle in their path [before Winterfell] is Last Hearth and Karhold”

Sansa:“Every direction the threat comes this [Winterfell] is the best place to be.”

Jaime: “If Winterfell falls, we [King’s Landing] fall. Three days.”

The bulk of the living forces in Westeros will be at Winterfell, if Winterfell falls, it would mean the entire army has fallen and basically all hope is lost. The Golden Company is Cersei’s hope but seriously? She’s not a military person. I trust way more Jaime’s opinions and he said their fate depend on Winterfell.
So I don’t think the WW will ever come near to King’s Landing because they will be defeated at Winterfell.

All The talking about King’s Landing and the Mad King’s Daughter

The safety of King’s Landing was a great concern to Daenerys and Cersei this season.
They’ve talked about how many people live there, how they should attack it, how they shouldn’t, how the city would fall easily, how they should defended it.
When they talk so much about an issue like this you can bet something will happen there. They talked a hundred times about the Wall, and the Wall fell. They talked 87439349 times Dany had THREE dragons, and she lost one. They’ve talked a million times how she can’t have children, so of course she’s gonna get pregnant next season. And they’ve talked a hundred times about King’s Landing. Something is going to happen there. Something bad.
Here are some of the most notable moments.

Dany: “If Viserys had three dragons, and an army at his back, he’d have invaded King’s Landing already

Yara: “We should hit King’s Landing now, hard, with everything we have”

and Dany’s response was:  “I will not attack King’s Landing. WE will not attack King’s Landing.”

Olenna said “Then how you mean to take the Iron Throne?”

And two episodes after she’s at rage because Tyrion’s plans have failed her and this was her visceral response:

“I have three large dragons.I’m gonna fly them to the Red Keep

Tyrion:“We’ve discussed this…”

My enemies are IN the Red Keep”.

And at the meeting at the Dragonpit she told Cersei:
“Your capital will be safe, until the north threat is dealt with

These are very interesting because we see Dany wants to take KL, but she haven’t done yet, because her advisors told her not to. But the thing is, Olenna told her not to listen to Tyrion and to be a dragon, and as the season goes she ignores him many times and even accuse him  of plotting against her more than once. The more Tyrion tries to make her listen more she ignores his advices.
Dany always had problems with that. Her very “black and white” vision sometimes led her to have bad ideas she just didn’t turn reality because she had  advisors who convinced her otherwise. But now she’s not  listening to her advisors anymore, and maybe the show told us her future through Varys”s words:

Tyrion:“Daenerys is not her father”

Varys :“And she never will be. With the right counsel. “

Daenerys is not her father is also another phrase they said a lot this season. They keep calling her “mad king’s daughter” and they even told us more than once what the Mad King did to Brandon and Rickard Stark. It’s almost like the show  is saying “Her father was mad. Don’t forget that”

Important characters have fled King’s Landing

They did a massive reunion at King’s Landing this season. Tyrion and Davos visited King’s Landing in a rush. They showed the Dragonpit, the place where Balerion’s skull is kept and winter upon King’s Landing. It’s almost like the show is saying  “let’s make a scene there because this is our last chance”. Bye bye King’s Landing. And now aside from Cersei all the remaining characters we care left KL. Jaime fucking Lannister and even Gendry we didn’t know was alive left King’s Landing.
The only important character left there is Cersei. Daenerys’ ultimate enemy.
They quoted more than once the amount of people living in King’s Landing at episode 7x7. Why would they do that if it wasn’t important? The time is short this seasons and the lines mean something.

Dany’s Visions

One thing that really upsets me in the show is the visions Dany had at the House of the Undying. In the book she sees lots of things important as fuck but in the show she has three visions. THREE FUCKING MISERABLE VISIONS. But if you look at them now you’ll see they are important as fuck too. And it’s the first one I want to talk about.
She enters at the Throne Room and there’s snow on the floor but the snow only starts to fall heavily when she looks up. And when she looks up and TA DAAAAAA, there’s no ceiling.
The Throne Room is destroyed like something came from the sky and destroyed the whole thing. Like I said I don’t think the Night King will ever come close to King’s Landing because the battle for the Dawn will most likely to end at Winterfell so what or who could came from the sky and destroy the Red Keep like this?

In the books it’s clear to me she see things that matter to her, her visions in the House of the Undying are about her life and important events that could have, that have or will happen to her. Things that relate to her somehow. The visions are not meaningless. So why would she see the Throne Room but not the Night King destroying it? Probably because she was the one who destroyed the place. She sees the destruction she made.

Bran’s vision

Bran’s visions were actually the very first trigger to me. At episode 6x6, after Hodor’s death Bran is running with Meera and uploading the visions from the - RIP older -Three Eyed Raven. D&D said they spend hours to choose which scene would be there cuz they were fucking important. PARAMOUNT IMPORTANCE. It’s was the first time we saw the Mad King,  there were some old scenes from the past seasons BUT there were some new ones that I don’t recall to see before..  

This one that features a single dragon in the sky.

And also this one that features a shadow of a single dragon over King’s Landing and there’s smoke in some places.

The tricky thing here is that these two scenes along with the scene where the Night King turns the Craster’s baby into a WW repeat 5 or 6 times. Only this three scenes repeat so much. 

For 3 times these scenes with the single dragon are followed by the scene of Daenerys with Drogon on her shoulder. No other dragon appears on Bran’s visions, only Drogon. There’s no other vision of Daenerys, only this one that always appears after the vision of KL burning.

If you ask me, the visions show King’s Landing burning by dragon fire and then who is responsible for that: Daenerys and Drogon.

Daenerys’s dragons are her advantage at war. In ADWD she even thinks she could never conquer the Seven Kingdoms without them. She already lost one to the Night King. What if she loses one more? She’d probably be desperate and hopeless. With only one dragon left she’d see herself with no better option to take the Iron Throne than to do what she already wants to do: attack King’s Landing.
That’s why Bran saw this in his visions. He saw the Mad King wanting to destroy the capital, and he saw Dany fulfilling her father’s vision.

Bran sees Jaime but not Cersei. Jaime already tried to kill Daenerys this season, will he try again at season 8 after Daenerys attack all the people he lost his honor to protect?

Daenerys burning King’s Landing on rampage is something I can see happening. It would fulfil the “Mad Queen/Daenerys villain theory” and part of the  audience would even agree with her actions, and say she’s not mad, she’s just at war and that’s the only option she had left. Only Cersei is left at KL so people would not feel sorry how we felt when Tyrell’s died in the sept. Cersei has yet to lose everything to a more beautiful and younger queen. Her family is gone, all she has left is the throne, and Daenerys is coming to take it.
When Cersei had lost everything then and only then the valonqar will kill her. She’ll probably flee KL during the fires just to be killed right after.


Daenerys have been accused of being a foreign invader by many people  this season, the Westerosi don’t trust her and burning King’s Landing would give the remaining Lords of Westeros more than enough reasons to rebel against her. I can think many ways this could lead to a Sansa x Daenerys struggle but this post is huge already so maybe another time.

Jealousy [REQUESTED]
  • Pairing: Jerome Valeska x Reader x Platonic! Deadpool
  • AU: HISHE-Villain Pub and Super Café
  • Prompt: [ANON] How about a female reader making Jerome jealous because he’s been sweet talking other girls. You can pick how it ends :D - Anon

I’M SORRY THAT I JUST FINISHED IT NOW ANON, I WAS BUSY YESTERDAY AND TOTALLY FORGOT TO FINISH THIS REQUEST ;-; Hope you like it though, also if you guys say that Deadpool isn’t a villain you’re half right, he is an anti-hero that means he is in between. That includes the explanation to Punisher too! ^^


You rolled your eyes at how casually your boyfriend, Jerome Valeska is seducing with the waitress who just gave a giddy smile in return. You and your partner Jerome, where at the secluded hideout that one of largest company made, Villain Pub. Unoriginal the name is but believe me the pub is like heaven. The pub was made by the HISHE Company, who established the Super Café where all the heroes hang out ironically. Mostly the Bat and the Man of Steel. Unlike the café, which was publicly open, the pub opens between midnight to three am and was hidden well and requires an identification for all that wants to enter the pub.

You pouted; Jerome was clearly not giving his attention enough for you. Your phone rang as it sang ‘Purple Lamborghini’, you excused yourself but Jerome and the waitress didn’t seem to bother. You groaned and continue on walking away towards the side of the entrance, that’s where a little amount of people crowd in. If you thought the C.R. is the best choice then you might encounter some wild villains getting points with the opposite sex.

You swiped to respond and greeted, “Hello?”

Boo!” you heard a boisterous shout behind your back as you grumbled in annoyment. It was the one and only Deadpool giggling at his little josh while ending the call, beside him was The Punisher—-

“Yeah, yeah Author. Try to shut up, I’m trying to make a move with Mrs. Valeska here and I cannot focus with you narrating and shit!” Okay Deadpool this is for the views all right, it’s not my fault that I just want to write some stuff with you in it. I can’t find the right Villain to make up with the reader so I chose an antihero like you! Now shut up and let me continue my business.

“I would rather not be called with that surname right now.” The man was rubbernecking at you weirdly as you pointed at the flirty Jerome and the love-struck waitress. He simpered under his mask, “I have a plan.”

You took interest at what he aforesaid and smirked, “I love how you think Wilson.” winking at him. The Punisher nictate and gazes at the male and female, shifting once in a while. “I don’t want to be part of this, now if you mind. I’ll just take a shot with El Diablo and Deadshot.”

Deadpool mewl at the answer of the male, “Awe men~ I was wishing a threesome but I respect your choice brother, go get some gay sex! I’m proud of you!”

The Punisher just snarled and took steps towards the bar. “So the plan is to make Jerome jealous I assumed,” you smirked, your device on hand. Deadpool puts his hand on his waist and took in the sights, “Why yes baby girl, and here’s the plan.”

-

Jerome was about to ask the attractive woman’s number when he took notice on how you just vanished unexpectedly. “As much as I love to talk more, gorgeous. But my date has seem to fled and I need to be a gentleman and find her.” He stood, his voice alluring the female to want more. “Alright Mr. J,” she slipped a tissue paper with her name on it and her number “Talk to me when you ditch the bitch.” Jerome took offence to this; no one can persecute his girl other than him. “I almost took that option but it seems,” he then proceeded to rip off the tissue in bits and lob it into the air “That you’re no better, just a slut.” He smiled while biting his lip and left the table behind while waitress stared at him in shock and embarrassment, his hand up waving away while he continued walking.

Toodles~”

He paced around the pub, trying to find you. Nodding to some acquaintance and even some of the older Jokers like him. When he arrived at the pool section, he examined a lot of people, mutants, etc. playing with each other as some cursed when the ball didn’t entered the hole, and with that many people he managed to detect you. There you are, with a man in red and black suit. It seems like he was teaching you how to play the game of pool, you were bended over the table, the stick on hand while pointing towards the white ball. The man also bended, his ‘largeness’ pressed to you while he held both of your hands educating you the right moves. And to his point of view, you were taking pleasure at the gesture of the disguised man.

“Deadpool he’s here! Take position!”

You could feel Deadpool’s raging boner pressed to your ass, “Will you control your penis?!”

He snickered, “Sorry dear, the Author won’t let me and besides I like this position.”

“He’s marching over the table,” Loki serenely stated while smirking. “ He seems upset. Good luck having a rough sex tonight (Y/N).” Even though Jerome was most likely to have rough sex by his looks and his infamous status, truth to be told he was gentle in bed. Afraid to hurt you, but now it seems not. You gulped at the thought, “Thanks.”

“Don’t mention it.”

“You shouldn’t speak that kind of stuff with a child nearby.” Maleficent concealed Draco’s ears and glared at the people around the pool table. She casted a spell around the boy’s eyes that was now covered with clouds, unable to see. “My father will hear about this!” he whined, wrestling the lady’s hands while waving off the cloud that seems to stay just on spot.

Tom Riddle moaned, “Children.”

“True,” Bill Cipher said, rolling his eyes while sipping on a wine glass that was poured with the blood of a certain child that was accompanied by an eye.

“(Y/N)!” Jerome marched over to you, his face evident with anger. He grabbed your arm and roughly pulled you with him towards the exit. “Whoa bro, chillax, have a kit kat!” Deadpool chortled.

ENOUGH!” Jerome shot a bullet towards Deadpool, a perfect shot on his forehead. He groaned in pain as Jerome just pushed you to the exit, with one last sympathetic look at your best friend. He just gave pained thumbs up while slowly crouching down and was now laying in pain while the other villains peeked at the state of him being on the ground moaning while mumbling incoherent words.

“I hate being immortal,” he groaned in pain. “Why the fuck did the author even made Jerome shot me before he fucks the reader, clearly she got what she wants as I suffer through the pain.” He rolled the last words.

“Don’t worry, I’m a Doctor.” Doctor Bong snuck in.

“Last time you said that to me you made me try to kill the big man with the claws and that kitty girl.”

“At least he’s doctor.” Tate Langdon shrugged.  “How the fuck are you out with the curse shit stuff ghost boy?!”

“It’s Halloween.”

“Oh right, well I’m happy for Jeromey trying a new genre of sex this time.”

And that’s when all the villains including the anti-heroes nodded in agreement.

businessinsider.com
Daenerys ignored Jon Snow's advice, and it could mean a popular fan theory is about to come true
The "Mother of Dragons," Daenerys Targaryen, might be your favorite character, but she may not be a force of good on the HBO series.
By Megan Willet & Kim Renfro, INSIDER

Here is a really well written article about both Daenerys good and bad qualities.  The authors of the article make a lot of great points about Daenerys as well as Jon.

Warning: Spoilers ahead for “Game of Thrones.”

Daenerys Targaryen is, in many ways, one of the most appealing characters in HBO’s “Game of Thrones.” She’s powerful and determined, and she inspires people to follow her again and again.

Now she’s close to forming an alliance with Jon Snow, the other main hero of our tale. Together, they’ll be a dragon-riding, direwolf-wielding duo who will slaughter the White Walkers and save Westeros. They could both perhaps be “The Prince That Was Promised,” Azor Ahai reborn.

But would a writer like George R.R. Martin really let his series end so simply?

Some fans don’t think so and point to a few troubling characteristics of Daenerys both on the show and in the books that could lead to her eventual turn toward a darker path.

Let’s explore just why some people think Daenerys could become a villain.


Daenerys is a vengeance-seeker.

Throughout the series, Daenerys is convinced of her own moral compass. If she ever witnesses something she views as wrong — such as rape or slavery — she immediately attempts to put a stop to it and punish the wrongdoer.

This a noble trait, but seeing the world in black and white and believing she is the sole bringer of justice is one of Daenerys’ downfalls.

We saw this early in the series when she saved a healer and maegi named Mirri Maz Duur, one of the Lhazareen women raped by the Dothraki, who had conquered their village. To Daenerys, saving Duur was an honorable thing to do, and she enlisted Duur to help heal Khal Drogo after he was injured.

Instead, Duur made Drogo’s condition worse and killed Daenerys’ son, Rhaego, when he was still in the womb using blood magic.

Daenerys doesn’t understand why the woman turned on her when Daenerys had saved her. But Duur viewed it quite differently:

“Saved me? Three of those riders had already raped me before you saved me, girl. I saw my god’s house burn, there where I had healed men and women beyond counting. In the streets I saw piles of heads: the head of the baker who makes my bread, the head a young boy that I had cured of fever just three moons past. So tell me again: Exactly what it was that you saved?”

Duur herself was seeking vengeance for the death of her people. In retaliation, Daenerys murdered Duur in Khal Drogo’s funeral pyre and emerged with her three dragons.

Was the scene epic? Of course. But this wouldn’t be the last time Daenerys murdered or harmed people who disagreed with her perception of what is right and wrong.

Another moment of Daenerys’ vengeance gone awry is when the Great Masters crucify 163 slave children as mile markers on her way to Meereen as a way to intimidate her. When she sacks the city, Daenerys crucifies 163 Great Masters as a punishment.

In “A Storm of Swords,” however, Daenerys begins to regret her actions, despite her initial sense of righteousness:

“She had them nailed to wooden posts around the plaza, each man pointing at the next. The anger was fierce and hot inside her when she gave the command; it made her feel like an avenging dragon. But later, when she passed the men dying on the posts, when she heard their moans and smelled their bowels and blood …

"It was just. It was. I did it for the children.”

Daenerys, though she suppresses the thought, realizes some of the masters may not have been guilty of the death of these children. She tries to convince herself that she was right to take their lives.

And in season six, episode five, show watchers saw Daenerys murder the powerful khals in their straw hut. These weren’t nice men — they spent a significant chunk of time insulting Daenerys and talking about how they intended to rape and kill her — but watching her burn them alive was still an unnerving moment for some viewers, especially because it looked like she took pleasure in watching them die.

Daenerys’ rationalizations for all these events should give her fans pause. Murdering evil people may seem like the right thing to do, but what would happen if Daenerys’ moral compass were ever skewed?

It wouldn’t be the first time she burned people who disagreed with her, after all.


Dragons as nuclear weapons.

In “A Dance With Dragons,” Daenerys compares her dragons to monsters:

“Mother of dragons, Daenerys thought. Mother of monsters. What have I unleashed upon the world? A queen I am, but my throne is made of burned bones, and it rests on quicksand. Without dragons, how could she hope to hold Meereen, much less win back Westeros? I am the blood of the dragon, she thought. If they are monsters, so am I.”

This wild and changeable nature of dragons is directly tied to Daenerys. When she equates herself to a dragon, she means it: She can be just as destructive and changeable as her dragon children.

What’s more, Martin has talked about ties between the dragons and nuclear weapons. Both are powerful to have but can easily lead to utter destruction.

“Dragons are the nuclear deterrent, and only Dany has them, which in some ways makes her the most powerful person in the world,” Martin told Vulture in a 2014 interview. “But is that sufficient? These are the kind of issues I’m trying to explore. The United States right now has the ability to destroy the world with our nuclear arsenal, but that doesn’t mean we can achieve specific geopolitical goals. Power is more subtle than that. You can have the power to destroy, but it doesn’t give you the power to reform, or improve, or build.”

We saw the full force of this when Daenerys attacked the Lannister army with Drogon. Director Matt Shakman chose to show the battle from Jaime and Bronn’s perspective to bring the horrors of dragonfire into sharp relief.

“I wanted to tell the story of what it was like … when war changes forever and a truly horrific weapon like napalm or an atom bomb is suddenly unleashed and what that does to the men on the ground,” Shakman told Insider.

Daenerys is sitting with her finger on a red button that could take out all of Westeros. She may not want to destroy the kingdom, especially before she ever has the chance to rule there. But by virtue of wanting to conquer Westeros, she could be bringing more death and destruction into a country still ravaged by war.

There’s a chance Daenerys could be viewed as a villain instead of the returning hero of House Targaryen.


Daenerys and the Mad King.

While Daenerys has remained fairly sane so far, the Targaryen dynasty has a history of mental illness, mainly because of intermarriage. Daenerys’ father, King Aerys II, was called the Mad King because he became paranoid and started killing people and hiding wildfire around King’s Landing.

Daenerys starts to worry about this possible “taint” in her blood, as do many other characters throughout the series. But it’s not so much that Daenerys could go crazy — though that’s certainly a possibility — as that she could follow in her father’s footsteps by punishing those who disagree with her or whom she views as her enemies.

Tyrion warned her against this tactic at the end of season six, and the two reached a compromise where Daenerys instead burned just one of the slaver’s ships and had Grey Worm execute two of the three slave masters.

Once she arrived in Westeros, Tyrion once again counseled Daenerys against immediately using the dragons to burn King’s Landing or other cities, telling her she didn’t want to be the “queen of the ashes.”

But their alternate plans failed because of Tyrion’s miscalculations of what Jaime and Cersei would do, and Daenerys got tired of sitting around and doing nothing. She rode Drogon into battle against the Lannister army and laid waste to their soldiers and loot. She didn’t choose a select few leaders to punish — she went for everything in sight.

Granted, it was better than her flying to the Red Keep and attacking civilians, but it was still hard to 100% root for her in this moment.

Daenerys also had a tense conversation with Varys earlier in the seventh season. She made him promise to be straightforward with her about her potential failings as a leader, but she then vowed to burn him alive if he ever betrayed her.

If Daenerys goes too far in the “fire and blood” direction, she could end up repeating her father’s mistakes — something that would end up costing her the throne, just like it ended up costing King Aerys both his kingdom and his life.


Jon Snow is the true hero.

A penchant for vengeance, a crazy father, and dragons do not together make Daenerys a villain. But let’s compare Daenerys with another heroic character in the “Song of Ice and Fire” series: Jon Snow.

In the books and show, Jon is similar to Ned Stark. He’s honorable, justice-minded, and takes no pleasure in killing. When he’s forced to take a life, Jon makes sure he’s the one to swing the sword, and he views it as a burden, not a pleasure.

For example, when he punished the brothers of the Night’s Watch who stabbed him in season six, Jon took no joy in it. He listened to every man’s last words before cutting the rope and watching them die. He did not look pleased by their deaths — unlike Daenerys, who smiled right before she watched the khals burn.

Jon also never asks for the responsibility heaped on his shoulders time and time again. Jon is forced to become the lord commander after Samwell Tarly submitted his name. He doesn’t want to be the one to take care of the Wildlings, but he feels morally obligated to help them and therefore becomes their savior. He doesn’t want to be the one to punish his brothers, even though they betrayed and murdered him, and yet he knows the responsibility falls to him.

And now, he’s king in the north after rallying the Northern houses around him. But he didn’t even want to do that — not until Sansa Stark convinced him it was the right thing to do.

Jon follows the traditional “reluctant hero” journey in many ways. He questions himself, he sometimes falls, and he picks himself back up.

It’s not unlike what Dumbledore tells Harry in the “Harry Potter” film series: “It is a curious thing, Harry, but perhaps those who are best suited to power are those who have never sought it. Those who, like you, have leadership thrust upon them, and take up the mantle because they must, and find to their own surprise that they wear it well.”

Jon never asks to be a leader; he’s just the best man for the job. It’s something Daenerys — with her Targaryen dynasty and ambitions — would never understand. When Jon and Daenerys meet for the first time, Daenerys tells him that all people enjoy what they’re good at.

“I don’t,” Jon said.

He was likely referring to leading and killing, the two things he’s been forced into since leaving Winterfell as a young man. Jon never sought out a royal title, but he’s good at owning it. That factor might make him the one person best suited for the job.


What does this mean for the series?

There’s also substantial evidence throughout the series that Daenerys will be a good ruler. She’s intelligent, she tries to listen to her advisers, and she genuinely wants the people she rules to be happy. People like Missandei and Grey Worm follow Daenerys because they believe in her ability to change lives for the better.

And even with her possible flaws, Daenerys would ultimately be a much better ruler than Cersei or Joffrey Lannister, or even King Robert.

Still, there could be a complicated friction as Daenerys tries to claim the Iron Throne. Instead of being the hero she assumes she will be, Daenerys is likely to face opposition and bring destruction and death to the kingdom.

On the other hand, she possesses weapons that, while volatile, could be the key to defeating the White Walkers (at least on the show). We know that Valyrian steel and dragonglass — two things believed to be made with dragon fire — can kill the White Walkers, so it stands to reason that actua fire from actual dragons would do the trick, too.

So while she may not be greeted in Westeros as a hero, she and her dragons could fast become their only hope. Plus, a Jon and Daenerys romance might be brewing — even though their shared bloodline grosses some fans out. Perhaps his “ice” will temper her “fire,” if you catch our drift.

In the end, only Martin knows what will happen, but Daenerys fans should buckle up. It could be a bumpy ride on her way to the Iron Throne.

Why Mona was the best ‘A’

OK, I know I’m not exactly going out on a limb here, but I think the reasons why she was so cool help illustrate why the later A reveals sucked so much.

First of all, she was a good character in her own right. Like, Mona was awesome even before the A reveal, and people actually cared about her. Charlotte was barely defined and no one really cared about her (ditto for Shana), while Alex, of course, we were unaware of the existence of. You can’t expect the audience to be shocked by a character they hardly know.

Second, she had a plausible motive. Not the one she gave, of course, but she still had one none the less. Fans could go “Yeah, that made sense”, even if the explanation she gave was more “Huh?”. For Charlotte and Alex all we had was the “Huh?”.

Third, she was part of their lives, and part of the story. One of the interesting things they did with her as A was that you can rewatch old episodes and see the overlap between her being A and her just being Mona. One of the great scenes of season 2 was Emily apologising to Mona, and you can see all the different Mona’s flashing across her face, almost fighting to control her reaction.

And this was where, imho, the next two A reveals really went wrong. In order to explain them, they had to create a backstory for both characters which took place entirely off screen. From a narrative point of view this was terrible, as it required straight-up exposition by the newly revealed villain, who had presumably been getting more and more frustrated at everyone else’s complete inability to work out their master plan. But also it reduced the liars, even Alison by the end, to side characters in their own story.

So many things that did happen ended up being red herrings, up to and including several murders. Heck, even the reason for Alison’s disappearance ended up being a “Whoops” rather than a “Damn!”. They kept setting up clues that there was something sinister going on, that the other body had been deliberately made to look like her, that the NAT club was involved, that Ezra was involved, that it was to do with Cape May, that Alison had some dark secret, that the liars themselves had done something, and then… nah.

Meanwhile, all the relevant action was taking place somewhere else with a bunch of characters neither the audience nor the protagonists even knew existed.

And finally, Mona being A worked thematically. She, like Jenna, was the walking reminder of the liars’ complicity to Alison misdeeds. But more than that, A was the personification of the rumour mill, of the judgement of society, of the hypocrisy and intrigue that goes from school to the broader society. A was the force that branded the girls liars when they told the truth, that exposed their failings while covering up those of the those in power. A was the condemnation that made a few selected victims into ‘bad’ girls, so everyone else could feel better about themselves.

Mona learned these forces, understood them, then turned them against the liars. Just as Alison had scapegoated her, she marked them out once Alison was no longer there to protect them. And because Mona was part of their world, this meant something.

Charlotte and Alex, not really. ‘Shits and giggles’ isn’t really a good motive for a villain, and it lacks any resonance as a piece of storytelling, The liars were just being punished for someone else’s sins, and in the end it meant nothing.

And the really frustrating this is, as mentioned above, they set up so many interesting hooks they could have hung a good story on, then ignored them. Then end of season 2, where Mona gets a visit in Radley, made perfect sense. There was someone else above Mona, someone controlling what was going on. Instead of just throwing out everything up to that point they could have built on it.

What would have made a lot more sense after the Mona reveal would have been to keep the idea of A as the watching, judgmental eye, but escalate. Bring in the constant voyeurism of the older males of Rosewood, the ones who exploit and objectify girls like the liars. Make it about the all of this, and the obvious creep factor in town. Make the next A a man, someone older, someone obsessed with the girls, someone with more resources and influence, but with a respectable cover, like an English teacher…

This show could have been so good if it had had any guts.

I usually try to keep my opinions to myself on this blog–or at the very least, in tags where people can scroll past/ignore them at their leisure–but honestly I think the one thing that frustrates me the most about people’s perception of Goro Akechi is that they think he is one sure, solid, cemented character type. That he is this one thing, or that he moves from this point to that. The way I see it, that’s not strictly true. Akechi wouldn’t let himself grow beyond something that wasn’t only unhealthy for him, but not helpful either. He gets in the way of his own growth and progress–he’s the boy who blocked his own shot, and in a lot of ways is like Hamlet. That not only is why he’s so fascinating as a character, it’s why his fate is so frustrating and gutting, and why it’s so difficult for me to deal with.

(As a side bar, that’s always why I loved his relationship with Joker–because it offers him the chance to open up, to give in, to let go and be a little vulnerable, which is everything he needs. It’s a contrast to everything the true villains of the game set him up to be, which was all about taking control from him. Incidentally, that’s everything Joker offers to every S-Link he has in the game [freedom, release], so I fail to see why Akechi should be an exception?)

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

Got any dark!lance, antihero!lance, or generally not a good person!lance recs?

hELLO! forewarning: most of the good ones I know for this are..er, controversial-pairing’d ones? So I’m sorry if you’re uncomfortable with any of these, but I really want to do these fics justice 8′0

your claws in me (klance, whump-ish, complete) is the classic and most obvious, I suppose, but I’m sure you’ve read that already,,nevertheless it’s beautiful and I still 10/10 recommend it!! ! !

Seed (klance+allurance+all three, oneshot)- This one toes the line of moral ambiguity soOOo so so so well; it immediately starts off with Altea being the ‘villain’ and the paladins on the side of the Galra, the ‘good,’ but if you think it ends there then Boi are you in for a ride bc this left me questioning Everything, and it has an open ending SO HAVE FUN WITH THAT

For King and Country (future shklance, oneshot for now)- Lance is raised by Sendak!! And from his point of view Sendak was just his dad that DIED BY THE PALADINS’ HANDS and it’s great,,for now, it’s just an introductory oneshot, but the author has promised more eventually so I’m excited >80c

One Way to Win the War (shklance, oneshot)- A What-If-Voltron-Had-An-Older-Target-Audience-And-The-War-Was-Handled-Realistically fic :^)))) the summary says it all, and I promise you reading the fic is as painful a moral experience as the theme implies: Coran played the role of Spy Master under King Alfor’s rule and he planned to play the same role under Allura, whether she knew it or not. Lance is his first recruit. Shiro is his second.

Aaand that’s all folks enjoy, I hope these hurt you as much as they hurt me I mean wha

My new book is available!!!

“Caught in the plot of a fairy tale come to life, young couple Tanner and Bernadette are separated by The Beast, a self-made monster set on playing storyteller with their lives. Each accompanied by mysterious creatures who help and harm in turn, the two women must work from different points of the same story to find each other, bring an end to The Beast’s plot, and return home to a life together.

Told from four alternating points of view, the story recasts a classic tale of kidnapped maidens and brave knights, strange guides and terrible villains, in a modern and notably queer light, with a promised happy ending.”


My second book is available on Amazon in both ebook and paperback format!!! If you like stories about queer girls and trans girls and supernatural creatures and adventuring in spite of anxiety, you will probably enjoy this one!

wakandangoddessofbooty-deactiva  asked:

Do u have anything for someone writing a story with four main characters (like the pittacus lore series)

I have to admit up front that I’ve never written a full manuscript with more then one pov character and I’m not familiar with Lorien Legacies, beyond seeing the title on occasion. As a reader though, I’m quite familiar with stories involving many main characters.

Here are four key things I look for in a book with multiple main characters…

Keep reading

anonymous asked:

How would Dabi act if he had a girlfriend? Hcs

  • If you are a villain, both of you would go out on missions together and team up, he’ll always make sure you’re by his side and if someone manages to hurt you  in any way, then well let’s just say hell is nothing compared to what Dabi is going to end up doing to that person.
  • If you’re a hero or a student at U.A, Dabi will try to convince you to see his cause, his point of view although he tries to deny the fact that you’re a hero, he will also try to make you join the League of Villains. During a battle Dabi won’t hurt you but he’ll hurt the ones that are trying to help you.
  • If you’re not a villain nor a hero, then Dabi is going to try to convince Tomura to kidnap you because your quirk can be useful to the league of villains.
  • Dabi is usually laid back but there are times when acts different around you, he’s gentler. Dabi, doesn’t mind affection that much, lazily he’ll return the affection towards you and he doesn’t mind being the little spoon or the big spoon.
  • Dabi can be very overprotective over you, he’ll leave hickies where he knows they’re visible so that way they know that you’re his and he also prefers inside dates to outside because it’s way to crowded outside and also expect walks at night, he loves walking at night when there’s no a single soul out there.

-Admin Lizzie

anonymous asked:

Ohhh man I am in LOVE with your RevelationAU where both twins are alive.. If you have time or want to explore it more PLEASE consider drawing / writing about it bc it's SO GOOD.. Anankos Corrin.. and Xander standing up for him.. bless you

Ahhhh, Anon ;w; I’m super happy you find it interesting! There are more drawings from the same scenario - I just have to find the time to finish them all ;o; Here’s a little summary of the AU:

Corrin = Male twin

Kamui = Female twin

Corrin is raised in Nohr with the full knowledge that Anankos is his father and that he is currently possessing Garon. Due to this, he is not confined to the Northern Fortress , but performs his duties much in the same way as Xander. Instead of suppressing his draconic tendencies, Garon!Anankos greatly encourages him to use his dragon form regularly, to learn to control it.

He loves his Nohrian family very much, and it’s eating him up inside that he’s essentially betraying them by keeping it a secret that Anankos has possessed their father. However, with Anankos constantly filling his head with his version of the truth and promises of how they’re all going to be a family, Corrin decides that it’ll all work out in the end. They’ll all be happy somehow - wishful thinking, I know.

Unlike game!Corrin, he knows perfectly well that Mikoto is his mother. The truth, according to Anankos, is that Mikoto was the one who kidnapped him in the first place - he simply took him back. Killing Sumeragi was simply a part of the process. Believing his father, Corrin is extremely bitter about being parted from his twin.

It would take ages to type out what happens throughout the game, but to make a long story short:

The Nohrian siblings discover that their father is pretty much dead. Knowing that Garon is little more than a meat puppet controlled by some monstrosity, Xander confronts Garon!Anankos and is is ultimately imprisoned for it, along with Camilla, Leo and Elise.

Guilt-ridden and very aware that his siblings are in grave danger, Corrin defies Anankos and sets them free, enabling them to flee to Izumo. When the Nohrian siblings arrive, they’re surprised to find that the Hoshido family is already there. One thing leads to another, resulting in a tentative truce, and eventually an alliance.

After that, the AU is pretty much like the game itself, only with Corrin as a reluctant antagonist. Every time he and Gunter runs into them, Corrin tries to convince his Nohrian family to rejoin them. He obsesses over them becoming a family again - including Kamui. When they refuse him, knowing that Anankos is likely to kill them the moment they set foot in Nohr, he resorts to force, believing it’s for their own good. He grows more and more indoctrinated as Anankos exercises his magical hold on him, causing him to become increasingly mentally frayed.

In the end, Corrin is one of the gatekeepers, along with Sumeragi and Mikoto.The only difference is that Corrin is still alive and just barely hanging onto his sanity.

From here on, there are two outcomes

Outcome 1:

For the good outcome, the Nohr/Hoshido families all need to have either A or S supports. This will cause the Hoshido family to see Corrin from the Nohrian family’s point of view - as a victim, rather than a villain. The fight will result in a gravely injured Corrin, which is then healed by both Elise and Sakura - causing him to survive.

Outcome 2:

If the characters haven’t reached support level A or S, Corrin will die

And that’s pretty much it, Anon ( ´ ▽ ` )ノ There a ton of details I didn’t include, and it’s probably riddled with plot holes ( ◞・౪・) But that’s the gist of it!

anonymous asked:

Dany's speech with the Tarlys reminded of when she said that those who disagree with her and her new world's rules can go and die in their old one...Destroy the world and the people who aren't a member of your group to make a 'new' and 'better' one. Huh, sounds like something a villain would say-Oh! I see what they did there...

I can’t remember where I saw it, but someone made a comment about D@enerys being a villain of the story the whole time but since we got to see from her point of view also people think she’s a hero since SHE believes she’s a hero. I agree with this 100%. There was another person who called her Danakin because “only a Sith deals in absolutes” and if that doesn’t describe her to a T then I don’t know what does!! D*ny might end up redeeming herself at the very end, but I am convinced that she is absolutely her father’s daughter.

nerd-most-likely  asked:

So I'm writing a novel. You know how it's just best to poop out the first draft basically ASAP? Well I'm writing and now that I'm getting to the end of it, somehow I find out much to my own damn surprise that it's actually in first person of this prophet who's fault it basically is for every ounce of the problems protagonist and crew have had. I've been writing in what I guess was assuming it was third person. Is this weird? Or do I need to go back and rewrite at what was a 3 am sleep drunk?

Isn’t writing fun? 

This is not weird at all. In fact, it’s completely normal. I’ve been working on my novel for a good three years now, and my current antagonists used to be the good guys. And my former antagonist became a good guy, and then became ambiguous, and then kind of became a bad guy again. Obviously things can change drastically as you’re writing a novel. 

But sometimes you just gotta roll with these punches and find intrigue in it. Our creativity ebbs and flows, and it’ll go in directions we don’t expect. One way I find enjoyment in it is being able to look back at where I started and see how far I’ve come. The journey our stories go through act like journals of our writing progress, without us actually having to journal. Won’t it be fun in years ahead to look back and see where your story began?

I don’t think you have to rewrite something just because it didn’t turn out how you expected. But you may have to take the time and see if you “come to your senses” or if this new direction is in fact the new direction. Was it a temporary moment of sleep-deprived insanity? Or was it a new idea germinating, only needing some encouragement from you to grow?

Considering you asked this question several weeks back (my apologies), I’m sure you might know by now how you feel about it. Who do you think the protagonist is? The prophet? Or the ones the prophet is causing problems for? What’s more, are you dealing with an “evil protagonist,” or do you think the motives or your prophet have changed to the point where this character is not the evil one, but the other characters are

In my little personal story up above, I mentioned that my antagonists changed throughout my writing, and this was a result of my exploring their motives more. Originally, they were simply background support for the protagonist. When I thought about why they were helping my characters stop the antagonist, it all came across as really self serving, and a lightbulb hit me late at night and I took their self serving motives and actually made them into malicious motives. And a new antagonist was born. And they were far more interesting as an antagonist than as background support for the protagonist. It was a huge change, but it excited me, so I went with it. 

So @nerd-most-likely, I think you should evaluate the motives of your characters to see what it is they really want. Once you can clearly state what each side wants, try to figure out how those wants affect the other side, and then further, what they will do about it. For example, what does the prophet want? And how exactly do those wants create chaos for your other characters? You alluded to it a LOT of chaos for those other characters, but was it intentional? What is the prophet going to do it about now? Try to help them, or continue to create more problems? 

Once you have that detailed out, look at it from the other perspective. What do those other characters want? In this case, solving all the chaos the prophet created could be part of it, and in achieving that goal of solving the chaos, is the prophet affected? Do they have to “defeat” the prophet to resolve the problems? 

Through this process, you might discover that both sides are truly at odds with each other. One side needs the other to fail in order to succeed. <<When this becomes true of your story, you’ve defined a protagonist/antagonist dynamic. Now you just have to decide which is which.

There’s potentially two stories you can tell here. The prophet’s story, and how the other characters’ actions affect that story; and the story of the characters, and how the prophet’s actions affect that story. You get to decide which one appeals to you more. Regardless of who the “evil” one is, you get to choose whose story sounds most fascinating. Even if the prophet is the one in the wrong, that story could be the better story. There’s no rule that says you can’t write stories from the perspective of the villains. You might even decide to write from both perspectives, so readers see both sides of the story and have to decide for themselves whose side they’re going to take in the end. 

As far as point of view goes, switch to first person if that feels more comfortable for you. I’m a huge advocate of staying in your comfort zone with point of view, and only challenging yourself if it’s something you want to do. It’s unusual for a story to use both first and third person perspectives, but it’s not non-existent. Storytelling is about experimentation, so experiment! 

I hope this was helpful! You are certainly not alone in dealing with drastic story changes as you’re writing. As frustrating as it can be to back track and change things you’ve already written, it’s also kind of cool to see the way our creativity…creates things. It’s not instantaneous - it’s a process that requires patience, and sometimes you have to put the pause button on “focus” because the attention span of creativity can be next to nothing. 

So just go with it! Good luck with your story :)

-Rebekah

anonymous asked:

Hey there! I'm building a world with two major classes -- witches (with actual magic) who run the place, and non-witches (ie no magic) who wind up doing most of the labor. How can I showcase the class tension between the two? Are there any ways to showcase the tension without making my ruling class look like bad guys? Thanksees!!

Anywhere you have differences, you will find tensions. Race, gender, religion, sexuality -all of these cause tensions from arguments and insults to wars and massacres. Class is no different.

Permit me, for a moment, to drag out some Marxist theory. The fundamental idea here is that the working class -the ‘proletariat’- are oppressed by the upper classes -the ‘bourgeoisie’- who own the means of production (factories, banks etc.). Marxists believe that the working class need to realise this and rise up in revolution to overthrow the bourgeoisie and take over the means of production for the benefit of all. All this stems from the idea that the upper classes are oppressing the working class for their own gain. So, some theorists, particularly Marxists, would suggest that you can’t have a ruling class without them being bad guys, because they are inherently oppressing other people.

It could also be seen as irresponsible to represent the ruling class as not being ‘bad guys’ in this sense. Imagine, for example, someone was asking how to make a white ruling class not look like bad guys for oppressing PoC, or a straight ruling class oppressing LGBTQIA people still appear like good people. It isn’t the role of this blog to educate on these matters, and there are a lot of great resources here on tumblr if you wish to explore those particular issues. I just want to make it explicitly clear that in many countries class is a social issue comparable to race and sexuality in the fervour and seriousness of the feelings in the debate. If witches vs non-witches is an allegory for current socio-economic class relations, Mod Galbraith would like to suggest that you tread carefully.

Now I’ve gotten that downer out of the way, let’s see if I can actually help out with what you came here for. Class tension can be exhibited in lots of ways, and -fairly or not- can be seen as going both ways (though note that the oppression only goes one way). Examples of tension include:

  • Name-calling: chavs, hood rats, ghetto, yobbos, white trash etc. are all slang used to denigrate and separate out people of typically lower socio-economic backgrounds. Likewise, snob, posh twat, prig and many other unprintable variations are used to mock and insult the upper classes. Magical/non-magic names can be a great way to showcase this, even if the names are less offensive than real world ones to keep your class divide a bit more civil
  • Accent: accents are a great way to separate out people from different backgrounds just by listening to them. As well as slang, someone’s accent can quickly be used to place their background and make judgements -whether accurate or not- about their personality. Even if your characters are from the same region, such as London, there’s a world of difference between a Cockney and an RP (received pronunciation -think Queen’s English) accent.
  • Segregation of living areas, jobs etc: anything from past segregation leading to the separation of races into different areas in US cities to house prices forcing poorer, lower class families out of an area can lead to class divisions by living area. Likewise with jobs, a non-magical person isn’t going to be able to take up a magic-reliant job, and may even be barred from government or police jobs by prejudice about their abilities/background.
  • Different social circles: witches and non-witches not typically associating each other can be quickly showcased the first time two characters from the two different groups interact. How are they supposed to say hello? Shake hands or kiss cheeks? Will they find that joke funny? Should I wear my amulets or take them off? Insecurity on the part of one or both characters can be very revealing of the differences between them without the need for aggression or anger. Then there’s friendship groups: does your witch have any non-magical friends?
  • Different political parties representing each group: this can be seen in the real world in the UK and many other countries. The UK has the Labour party which was set up to be the working man’s party, and the Conservatives who are traditionally seen as the party of the upper classes (please no-one come and argue about who these parties represent etc. etc., I know there’s a lot of dispute about this but I’m speaking historically on purpose here :). Witches and non-witches may end up with two different parties representing them in government, with each group broadly voting for ‘their’ party
  • Protests: if you don’t want your witches to look like the bad guys, I’d stay away from protests. Nevertheless, class tensions often lead to protest, and on occasion to a full revolution (which probably makes Marx happy). This depends on to what extent your witches are ‘running the place’ and how happy your non-witches are to accept this status quo. 

Playing with point of view may help you to dissipate a potential ‘bad guy’ image. There’s a saying along the lines of “the villain doesn’t see himself as the bad guy,” and that rationality can be extended to groups of people as well. If your story is told from the PoV of one witch and one non-witch, their perceptions of their own class and reality may balance out the ‘bad guy/good guy’ dynamic while still illustrating tensions.

Another way to show tensions is through communication culture clashes. What one class may find normal and polite, the other class may find rude or awkward which may lead to further tensions between individuals and classes. For example, in some cultures, it is common to kiss as a greeting, even if it is with someone they first met. For someone coming from a culture where this is not common, it may create a moment of discomfort and confusion, especially if they did not have prior knowledge of this cultural aspect. In this way, neither party is necessarily good or bad, they are just different in ways that have the potential to cause friction. So for your witches, maybe they have a magical signature that they automatically exchange upon greeting someone, which would exclude the non-witches and create a moment of ‘oh no what do I do now?’ moment for both parties when they first meet.

Tl;dr be careful when playing with class divisions. Too little and it could be insensitive, too much and it could take over your story. There’s hopefully a lot here for you to work with and adapt to your needs, so good luck with all your writing!

the-girl-wh0-waited  asked:

So, I got an ask today asking me what I would do if I was a PLL writer. So, now I'm interested in other people's ideas. If you were a PLL writer what would happen? (storylines, deaths, etc) What would you make different?

I love this question!! I don’t have an idea of what the whole storyline would be but my storyline would differ like this:

  • Aria is Uber A: This was the first theory that I really fell in love with. I love the idea of one of the 4 main girls being twisted enough to torture themselves and their friends. This type of betrayal is right up my alley! I don’t know what her back story would be, though.
  • Ezria playing the game together: I loved Ezra’s story arc in season 4 and Ian played that evil side of him so well and I can only imagine how insane he would be if he were the villain of the show.
  • Extending the doll house storyline: The writers had the potential to make this storyline incredible but instead they rushed it in two episodes. I would have a decent amount of episodes taking place in the doll house and I would also show all the torturous things -A did to the girls (without any boundaries!).
  • Include a Halloween episode in every season: These were some of my favourite episodes of the whole series. I’m still upset that season 4′s was the last one. I would include these in all seasons because it makes the gap between each season more bearable.
  • More mystery, way less romance!
  • Reveal A to the audience before the girls find out: I loved the way the show did this with the Toby and Ezra reveal. It made every single scene with these two characters exciting from that point on so I would do this with the ultimate reveal and not advertise it so it completely shocks and surprises people (but there would be a catch with that reveal! which I explain further down).
  • Kill one of the main 4 girls once they get too close to figuring out the truth: I would have this episode a couple episodes earlier than the finale. This would set the tone for a finale that I would make absolutely terrifying.
  • Have the villian win: I don’t know how this could be pulled off, but I would love it if there was a way to change the way people see the show after the finale in a daring and shocking way. I would love it if Aria double crossed Ezra and he goes to jail. The audience thinks all is well until the camera takes them to Aria with an evil smirk in her lair and there is an internal monologue explaining what she did. People then realise they had been wrong about Uber A.
  • Include an episode from -A point of view and see how and WHY they did everything. I think this would work if the villain wins in the end and this could be a bonus episode after the finale?

I have no idea if all this would even work in a storyline but I find them very interesting lol! Overall, I would make the tone of the show much, much darker.

Sorry for answering this late. :( I wanted to think about the question for a while before answering it!

Top 5 Final Fantasy Antagonists

It’s not like I have 3 fics to finish 2 of them with deadlines, nor like I am facing a mayhem of time chaos, or that I have the basic human need to sleep, nope. Let’s just find something else to spend time on. So here we are.

Because this will feature spoilers related to FFXV under a cut at the end, I have to do this now. Tags! Please, I tag everyone that wants to do this, and all I ask is that you mention me in the post @hannibalcatharsis-zero because I want to read people’s opinions, thoughts, biases, whatever, on your top favorite FF antagonists. You don’t have to make it as lengthy as I did, but I do talk a lot.
If I may, I’d like to directly tag @lvl99fangirl @adrastia @fujoshilyfe @datamarluxia @haeng-syo-peace@dancing-aqua@allowthisfam​ if you want to, simply because I’ve exchanged some words with you before.

Enough endless intro, on to the huge post.

Runner ups:

- Rufus Shinra (Compilation FFVII)

A rare case in FF, he’s neither an experiment, hybrid of some sort, madman or blessed/cursed with some awesome powers. 

This guy is entirely and purely human and therefore is all the more cold heartedness, lust for power, intellect and cunning. Seeing him the first time in Advent Children was one thing, but going back and seeing the stuff he did in FFVII? Even before that? Man, Papa Shinra wasn’t a nice man at all, but apples don’t fall far from the tree and the prodigal son sure as hell did some bad stuff and planned worse. And tried to kill dad more often than his other two brothers did just to rule in his stead even more ruthlessly than the old man. 

Good thing it just took a damn WEAPON firing, explosion and near death experience, Meteor falling and Geostigma to make him consider atoning.

I actually want to see him on the FFVII remake more than anything else really. Full HD Rufus on the prime of his full power-mad and evil persona? Damn.


- Kadaj, Yazoo & Loz (Compilation FFVII) - specially Kadaj

Originally posted by petite-princee

Originally posted by shinysnivy

I love Sephiroth’s Remnants, particularly Kadaj. They’re all so childish (including Yazoo!), which I find rather interesting when you know they’re parts of Sephiroth. Shoutaro Morikubo’s voice acting was beautiful and really built Kadaj’s threatening and deadly persona, while having the feeling of mean but lost child you kinda want to hug. Or would want to, if he wouldn’t likely kidnap your children, torture and kill you.


- Snow Villiers (Lightning Returns Final Fantasy XIII)

Yes, I know he’s not a real antagonist (not for long anyway), but look at him. He needs to be mentioned just because look at him.  

Holy shit.


–My top 5 favorite antagonists–

(not in order of preference!)

- Sephiroth (Compilation FFVII)

Originally posted by xsephiroth

Sephiroth is the name even non-FF fans know of. You have to give to a character when they create such a huge impact overall.

He is visually striking. When he did get voice acting, his voice is memorable (the Japanese one more, but the English isn’t bad either). His theme is memorable. He commited one of the most unexpected and memorable main-character murders in games specially as of 1997, and for that reason remained engarved in gaming history. He overall has all the immediate aspects to make him memorable.

The fallen hero that became a villain instead when he loses his mind after finding about (and missinterpretating) his origins as a genetical experiment. Personally, seeing his downfall in Crisis Core made me all the more fascinated with him. I grew to like him a lot more after seeing that, the change that happened to him. How awesome was Sephiroth, seriously? He was kind. Funny even. Man, Hojo is one of the most truly evil characters in the wholeout FF franchise.

The only one with shitty father (the worst) who DIDN’T kill him! Man, seriously, Rufus tried, Genesis did, so did Seymour. Seriously Sephiroth, why didn’t you kill Hojo.

Crisis Core is excellent overall. One of the saddest games.

I honestly don’t know how to exactly pinpoint what makes me like Sephiroth so much.

But the music helped too.
EVERYONE that knew me in 2006-2010 knew this song. I made sure of it.



- Genesis Rhapsodos (Crisis Core/Compilation FFVII)

Originally posted by caerberus

Genesis doesn’t really get a lot of love, and I can’t really blame long-time fans in particular. But personally, I find it a shame.
It does help, I think, that I don’t take Crisis Core in its English version. The whole FFVII universe exists in my head in its Japanese format, I’m sorry to the voice actors of the Eng sub. Gackt’s voice is Genesis’s (well, that’s the point really. He is a lot more irritating in English.

I love everything about this guy. I love the melancholia he lived in, the search for purpose/understanding through parallels, the obssession and obssessive persona he created, the search for friends of equal worth, the utter self hatred, the madness he fell into.
Genesis is tragic.

And the just little (little) stabs and just friendly twists of the knife on Sephiroth’s psyche “We’re all monsters, I’m a monster, but you’re the worst of all. You’re the defination of monster, you know? But hey, I want you to be my friend, help me out :) “

I find it a huge tragedy that he outlives so many people when he didn’t plan to.


- Seymour Guado (FFX)

Originally posted by datamarluxia

My love for this guy exceeds my argumentation ability.

The nihilist even before I knew what nihilism was. I for one never minded his English voice, which in later years I found that people had a quirk against. One of the things I appreciated was to see him fall to madness and how it reflected in his voice turning fiend-ish. I like that he’s the counterpart/parallel of Yuna and how she turned her goal into preserving life and overcoming pain while he decided to end life to end pain.
With the life he lived, you can hardly NOT understand why he sees the world like that. Ostracized for being half-Human half-Guado when obviously he had no fault on that; his father who DID have a part on that shipped him away with his mother arguably for their protection; his mother commiting second-hand suicide to help him gain public appeal against him literally crying for her not to (I wonder why he would prefer his mother alive, huh? I still love those memories in Zanarkand Ruins so much); finally being accepted because he fucking exceeds at magic and has the most powerful Dark Aeon one can have only to see the utter corruption of the world and the religious-political regime that ends up confirming and preaching what he knows from experience - life is about suffering and will ever be.
Yeah.

And he’s the definition of ‘doesn’t die’ (Sephiroth too). I mean, you KILL him at 30% of the game, and he literally returns more than to haunt you :) that’s 4 fucking fights, and overall most people can agree that Seymour Flux was one of the hardest storyline boss fights in the franchise. Many tears were shed under countless hours of attempts only to be crushed each time under Total Annhilation attack.

Besides, not many antagonists include in their plans literally marrying the protagonist (and beforementioned parallel)and having one of the most beautiful wedding purposals 

Originally posted by caerberus

Originally posted by caerberus

Originally posted by captestheimxv

and one of the most awesome weddings ever in gaming history,  in my opinion.

Originally posted by caerberus

Originally posted by iures

Originally posted by caerberus

Originally posted by ethernalium

Originally posted by aegisol


- Caius Ballad (FFXIII-2/Lightning Retuns)

Originally posted by cleyra

Caius saved Final Fantasy XIII trilogy for me.

The whole point of making a post on antagonists/villains is because these characters are a structural part of any story - any FF in particular. FFXIII severily lacked and failed overall to me because of this. Then came this guy and as soon as he appears in the intro, you cannot take your eyes off him.

Originally posted by finalaeon

Originally posted by liberatorofsouls

Originally posted by thingsinlifeyoujustdo

Originally posted by noellkreiss

Caius has got to be one of the most selfless antagonists in the franchise. He’s mean, yeah, but you get his point from the get go. He’s willing to end everything and everyone if it means he can save a girl that has been suffering endlessly (in his view at least - that was one beautiful twist in the story/interpretation, Noel’s words about Yeul’s reincarnation).

And you know what, another rare thing in FF antagonists: he’s successful. He got what he wanted, most of it anyway, including his death. There were some setbacks and unexpected stuff for him in LR indeed (he didn’t plan the Chaos of Yeuls binding him in the paradox, but well) but he got pretty much his biggest three wishes - kill Etro/kill himself, unleash Chaos and Valhalla to destroy time and save Yeul.
Not everything ended up exactly like he envisioned, but the result was basically the same. And he was happy.

Also. The voice. The fcking VOICE. Liam O’Brian, man.

The pain in his words!

And the music!


- Ardyn Izunia (FFXV)

Originally posted by datamarluxia

Well this part isn’t spoilers yet so:
The voice. The. fcking. voice. The range of emotions Darin de Paul and Fujiwara Keiji have in their performances is amazing. Ardyn is so unique, so regal, over the top if he wants and so often funny. So captivating. 
His whole image/pose is striking, the way he stands and moves. Will anyone deny that that entrace in the fucking BEAUTIFUL MAGESTIC throne room in Kingsglaive didn’t immediately steal all and any attention to himself despite his surroundings and King Regis standing in the throne? He owns a scene the moment he appears.

Originally posted by verryfinny

I also found his more human image (meaning his realism really - you don’t get an antagonist in FF looking this real when it comes to mid/late 30s) quite appealing when compared to others. He’s beautiful obviously, like all others, and still clearly FF-ian, but he’s less ‘facially perfect’ compared to several others before him.

-spoilers- henceforth obviously

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