encyclopedia of spells

San Cipriano Banishing

During his days as a sorcerer, San Cipriano conjured up spirits at will. According to some legends, he had a post of demons at his personal disposal. Who better to perform an exorcism? Indeed, San Cipriano is the patron saint of magicians and exorcists. Allegedly the condition oil named in his honor possesses a banishing effect.

Dress brown candles with San Cipriano Oil; this should send low-level spirits fleeing. Accompany candle burning with requests for San Cipriano’s personal assistance. Allegedly invoking his name scares the mid-level evil entities away.

(from The Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes)

anonymous asked:

hello! i've been trying to research magic, but unfortunately most books i find are specific wicca, which i'm not interested in. do you have any book reccomendations that arent wicca centric? thank you! i love your blog :^)

Oh heckin yes I do My amazon wishlist is literally like six pages long… ALL BOOKS

WARNING: This Is Going To Be Extremely Long!

First though I want to note that while I 100% understand your feelings about the Wicca stuff (being a very NOT Wiccan Witch), not all books that are Wicca leaning are bad! I’ve gotten loads of useful information from books that tended to be a little new agey. That’s where being objective comes in! With ANY book, you should take it with a grain of salt, and some with a whole shaker. But it’s up to you to pay attention to misinformation and conflation, and to know how to do research to prove or disprove that something in a book you read is true or not. Does that make sense?? 

Anywho, a couple of books that are still kind of “Wicca-y” but great:

Those are all books from my personal collection that I would recommend! Now as for the Non-Wicca Books, Let’s dive in! Not all of these have I read or owned, and they are in no particular order. You’ll notice most of them relate to “Traditional Witchcraft” or West Country, because that is where my practice is focused. 

PHEW!

That was a lot! Okay anon I hope this gives you a good starting place! 

constantly-disheveled.tumblr.com/ask

Reading List



I have received many requests for a reading list, so I will compose one here. I intend to update this post as I find/remember more good material. I’m doing it by author, because if the author is reliable, then their work as a whole usually is. There’s a lot of nonsense out there, and some of it’s really popular.

Take everything in every book with a grain of salt. I promise that every single book you read will have something in it that’s wrong.

Margot Adler: “Drawing Down the Moon” is the best history of Neo-Paganism I’ve been able to find. She has accurate information, and reveals some of the dirty secrets, including some of the things the early leaders (Gardner, Mathers, etc.) lied about. Good primer for the premise that everyone has something to teach, and everyone has a little bullshit to sift through.

Ted Andrews: I consider him quite reliable. I’ve read a couple. Worth looking into.

Paul Beyerl: He is a master herbalist who writes and teaches on the subject, and produced a “Compendium of Herbal Magick” which is quite good.

Raymond Buckland: Top name in Wiccan witchcraft.

Scott Cunningham: One of the major players in making Wiccan witchcraft accessible to the uninitiated. I consider him very reliable, though he is a bit fluffy. He glosses over the dark arts and labels psychoactive herbs as “poisonous” whether they are or not.

Even if Wiccan witchcraft isn’t what you’re looking for, “Wicca: A Guide To the Solitary Practitioner” and “Living Wicca” are still worth reading. His “Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs” is excellent. He also wrote on many other subjects.

Christian Day: I’ve only read “The Witches’ Book of the Dead”, and it was quite good. I’m inclined to say anyone who can teach dark arts well is probably reliable in general. 

Mrs. M Grieve: The serious herbalist should read “A Modern Herbal”. I have a hard copy, but they can be hard to find in good condition. PDF is widely available. Keep in mind that it’s half a century out of date, but most modern herbalists cite or quote her at least once in their own books. I’ve even seen at least one steal exact quotes from “A Modern Herbal” without credit.

Mrs. Grieve does not shy away from poisonous herbs, and expounds on their medicinal properties. Though I would not rely solely on any single text to try to learn to use such things. 

Judy Hall: “The Crystal Bible” is a lovely quick reference on crystal magic. It is concise and easy to read. If you need to be able to explain what a crystal is good for quickly, this is the book you need.

Judika Illes: “The Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells” is my absolute favorite witchcraft book. Everyone should have it. Well researched, and the spells are excellent. I rarely use them as anything other than inspiration to write my own, but they’re grand. Please get this book.  

Dorothy Morrison: All I’ve read so far was “Everyday Magic” but it’s one of my favorites. Strongly recommend it. her advice on modernizing your craft and working with what’s available to you is indispensable.

Robert Simmons and Naisha Ahsian: “The Book of Stones” (the second edition is blue, look for that) is my favorite book on crystal magic. Very detailed and very thorough.

Sweet Spirit Powder Spell

To repel evil spirits, while simultaneously beckoning benevolent, kind, protective ones:

  1. Grind the following botanicals together to produce a fine powder: frankincense, honeysuckle blossoms, roses, and vetiver roots.
  2. Sprinkle the powder onto lit charcoal and burn incessantly, until you’re convinced the danger is over.

(from The Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes) 

Tatterdemalion Dreams

This is a coda to Ragtag Heroes, not really intended to become a separate thing but my attempt to get into Sirius’s head. Excuse me while I upend my drabble bin over your heads. :D


Sirius’s little brother has always been just that—little. Regulus was a slight and slender child, and has grown into a lean and lithe man, a little too thin and rawboned from constant stress but still pretty in the way that their parents always despaired of. Sirius can admit, despite his hatred of her, that Walburga Black was an absolutely stunning woman, and Regulus takes after her very much in looks.

Not so much in personality, though, regardless of what Sirius thought as a child. Not after what he’s managed to accomplish.

Slumped in a dusty old armchair, Sirius watches his brother wander around Grimmauld Place’s library, touching covers, stroking long fingers over worn spines. This is Reggie’s element and always has been—Sirius was honestly astonished that he ended up in Slytherin rather than Ravenclaw, during the Sorting. Regulus as a child, in Sirius’s mind, was forever clutching a book, sometimes as big as himself, and wandering around with a dreamy, distant expression. He thinks of it with a bit of a pang, now, because at some point during his first year at Hogwarts that warm burst of fondness at the sight of his little brother, forever trying to please everyone, transformed into something sneering and derisive and passively loathing.

Regulus being sorted into Slytherin was the final straw, and Sirius, already immersed in being different from their parents and surrounded by Gryffindors who held the same beliefs, had turned his back on Regulus, not about to associate himself with a sniveling follower.

Never mind the fact that Regulus was eleven. Never mind that their parents had always leaned harder on Regulus, who was never nearly as willful. Never mind that Regulus adored Sirius since birth, as the only one who spent any amount of time with him outside of the house elves. Sirius had turned away, found a new brother in James who suited him so much better, and left without a backwards glance.

Their parents were never kind, even to the family favorite, and Sirius watches Regulus meander through the shelves with something like guilt roiling in his gut. Should have known, he thinks, and the vague, distant regret he’s felt since learning of his brother’s death is back in full force, because Sirius had run away from the family and left Regulus behind. It doesn’t matter that they were at odds at the time; Regulus was always a gentle soul, always tried to please their parents no matter what. Sirius could have easily taken him along to James’s, could have convinced him to abandon their parents’ ideals if only he’d remembered the sweet little boy Regulus had been, rather than looking at the distant, aloof Black prince he’d been forcibly molded into.

But he didn’t, hadn’t bothered, and something in Sirius is—

“Leo Prince,” Regulus says unexpectedly, making Sirius jump.

“What?” Sirius asks, blinking.

When he looks up, Regulus is giving him that nostalgic you’re-a-moron-Siri-and-must-I-lower-myself-to-your-level look. He’s seen it quite often—usually from the child Regulus used to be, excited about some obscure spell or ritual or potion, some little-known aspect of ancient magical theory that lost Sirius completely about twelve words into the explanation. Not that he’s an idiot, academically—Sirius has always been proud of his grades—but Regulus is something entirely different. Even their parents never quite knew what to do with him, beyond shipping him off to Voldemort in a gift-wrapped package.

“Yes, Reggie?” Sirius grins at his little brother, for the sole reason that the nickname drives him batty and nothing gets his ire up like pretending to be stupid. “What was that?”

Regulus rolls his eyes so hard Sirius wonders how he doesn’t strain something. “My name,” he explains, tone long-suffering, “for teaching at Hogwarts.”

Sirius turns it over in his head for a moment. “Leo?” he repeats dubiously, because outwardly Regulus is the perfect Slytherin, and whenever he’s not being Slytherin he gives a damned good impression of being a born Ravenclaw. Nothing leonine about him, really.

That gets him another roll of Regulus’s eyes, though it’s subtler this time. “The star Regulus is the brightest heavenly body in the constellation Leo,” he says, and his mouth quirks in a wry smile. “Also called ‘the Heart of the Lion’.”

Sirius snorts at that, wondering what twist of fate gave Regulus the one Black name that suited him exactly. ‘Heart of the Lion’ indeed. “And Prince?”

“From the literal meaning of my name.” Regulus turns back to his books again, plucking one off the shelf and adding it to the already sizeable pile he’ll be taking to Hogwarts with them. “’Little King’. It’s a name I’ve used before, in parts of the Continent. So if a particularly overprotective parent should try to trace my movements, there will be a trail. Leo Prince spent two years in Italy and then Eastern Europe, studying blood rituals from ancient times.”

Of course he did, Sirius thinks with a roll of his own eyes. He’s spent several weeks already with Hermione, and even she can’t hold a candle to his little brother. But rather than say anything—although it’s tempting, because Reggie being defensive over his rituals and spells is easily one of the more amusing things Sirius has ever encountered—he just asks, “And disguises? It’s more than likely that Peter told Voldemort about my Animagus form, and I hate to say it, Reggie, but you—”

“Yes, yes,” Regulus cuts him off, clearly annoyed. He’s always been easy for Sirius to rile. “We look very similar, I’m aware. Harry thought I was you, at first glance.”

Sirius blinks and fights a frown. Regulus is pretty, and Sirius has always considered himself—not without corroboration from other sources—to be handsome. Then he glances up, catches the tail end of Regulus’s wicked grin as the younger Black turns away, and huffs. “Oh, go on, rub it in,” he growls, chucking a cushion at his smirking brother. “At least I take after Father rather than dearest Mother in looks, pretty boy.”

That earns him a rude hand gesture and a scowl. “Anyway,” Regulus says forcefully. “I won’t use charms to change my appearance—they’re too easily detected and broken, even by the simplest of wards or spells. But…” He trails off, rummaging in a cupboard for a moment, and then, with a victorious sound, emerges holding a pair of glasses with delicate silver frames. He slips them onto his face, then pulls his hair from its loose tail and twists it into a messy braid falling over his shoulder.

They’re simple changes, but they’re able to highlight the differences between them. Sirius sits up straighter, taking in the way the glasses manage to entirely change Regulus’s face, and the hairstyle gives him a bookish, distracted, professorly air. With a change of clothes—good-quality robes, he thinks, maybe a little tattered, quiet colors, slightly too large—Regulus will be all but unrecognizable. Oh, there will be similarities, but there used to be a pureblood Prince family, and they intermarried with the Blacks enough to write off the resemblance as a result of typically tangled pureblood genealogy.

Regulus is giving Sirius the same look in return, but his is faintly distracted. “You, however,” he murmurs, “will need a charm or two, if only to keep from giving any of the more superstitious students a heart attack, looking like a Grim.” He trails off, muttering under his breath, his gaze absent, and Sirius realizes that this is his contemplative look. He’s no doubt running through every glamour charm he knows, cataloguing faults and weaknesses.

Such a Ravenclaw, really, Sirius thinks, and doesn’t even bother to fight the fond smile that rises. Good old Reggie, the walking encyclopedia of spells.

Then Regulus looks up at him and smiles that singularly angelic smile that means he’s about to show how he and Sirius really are related. He taps long fingers against his lips to hide the beginnings of a smirk, and murmurs, “Well, you’re the size of a bear, so there’s no way we’ll actually be able to pass you off as a normal dog, but…white, I think. Yes, white will do nicely. Maybe with a touch of tan?”

Sirius only has a moment to feel horrified before Regulus’s wand is out and moving.

“Well?” his little brother demands, sounding unnervingly like McGonagall. “Change already, we haven’t got all day.”

It’s going to be a very long year indeed.


It’s been a near age since Regulus last set foot on Hogwarts ground. He stands just outside the gates, staring up at the vast and imposing castle—strangely comforting, a home more than Grimmauld place could ever be, and he wonders if it’s like that for everyone. Perhaps only those from broken homes, if the Black family can count as such. Sirius, at least, had the Potters, but Regulus was always a distant, aloof child with few acquaintances and fewer friends. He had no one.

Unconsciously, his fingers curl into the thick fur of the beast standing at his side, higher than his waist and as big as a bear. White fur now, rather than black, but it’s still Sirius, still his brother brought back to him. Maybe everything isn’t entirely easy between them yet, but they’ve been strangers longer than they’ve been family, and they’re readjusting. Sirius whines softly and bumps against his hip, and Regulus musters up a smile for him.

“I’m fine, Siri,” he murmurs, although his fingers stay buried in pale fur. “Just…overwhelmed, a little.”

Normally he’d never admit to such a thing, but this is Hogwarts and he’s coming back and there’s absolutely nothing in the world he’s dreamed of more than destroying the Dark Lord with his brother at his side and the Light at this back. This is a step closer, the fifth out of seven, and then there’s only the snake left to find. Regulus has thrown out his net already; there are many people who owe him favors by now, with his knowledge base and skill set and Slytherin cunning, and Nagini will be found soon enough.

Just Ravenclaw’s artefact now, and then Harry. Their goal is so close, so achingly close that Regulus can almost taste it, and after sixteen unwavering years, he’s ready. Ready for a normal life, a death not at the hands of his former master, days not spent running from even the vaguest chance that Voldemort could discover him or his plans. It’s been too long.

With a huff of very un-canine impatience, Sirius shoves at him again and then heads up the road, strides sure and confident. Regulus only hesitates for a moment longer before hurrying to catch up with him, careful of his baggy robes. He hates them, if only for Sirius’s teasing at how he looks like a waifish scholar who thinks too much to eat. Not that Sirius is one to talk, really—he’s changed from looking like a Grim to looking like something out of Norse myth that’s about to devour the sun.

But Sirius is happy to be out of that dreary and rundown house, and Regulus can’t blame him. About the only good thing remaining there is Kreacher, and the elf is getting on in years. He’d been overjoyed that Regulus returned, but as much as Regulus missed him he hadn’t been able to bring himself to stay. He’d packed everything he needed in a day and headed out to Hogwarts and his new post, Sirius in tow. They’re quite a pair, really.

McGonagall meets them at the main doors, still regal and authoritative in a way Blacks can only dream of being, but she smiles faintly at Regulus. “Professor Prince,” she says. “How good to have you back. If you’ll follow me, I will show you to your chambers.”

This is happening, Regulus thinks suddenly, as his heart stutters and leaps forward into a gallop. This is real.

Professor, she called him, and that’s what he is now. No longer a nameless, fleeing face but a person, a figure of some standing, with a name and a past even if it isn’t his own.

That’s…pleasing.

Thicket's Magical Book Recommendations

Mastering Witchcraft by Paul Huson

This book is a classic. Mr. Huson goes over the basics of magical work, including steps on how to visualize and how magic works. He also instructs you on how to prepare your ritual tools and begin casting magic. The book also delves in to deeper stuff, such as summoning Vassago (a demon). If you are interested in traditional witchcraft, this book is for you.

Mystical Origins of the Tarot by Paul Huson

Another author (maybe Robin Artisson?) described this as the only book on tarot you will ever need. I agree. It is filled with history as well as unique interpretations of the cards. If you are a tarot reader, this book is a must to further your education and your reading skills.

The Complete Guide to Psychic Development by Cassandra Eason

This book is very New Age. It does have a lot of good stuff in it. She does generally expect that you have a library of crystals and a cabinet of candles as even her basic rituals call for a variety of specific stones and 13 pink candles. Glean what you can from this book and see where perhaps you can simplify some of her rituals. As the name implies, this book is all about psychic development.

Psychic Self-Defense by Dion Fortune

Awesome book. I’ve read it a few times. If you want a peek at how magic can really mess up your life, read this book. There are so many hidden gems here, it’s really worthwhile.

The Witch’s Familiar by Raven Grimassi

A really interesting book on how a witch may obtain and control their familiar spirit.

Grimoire of the Thorn-Blooded Witch by Raven Grimassi

This book details Grimassi’s personal tradition. If you want a solid tradition to follow, this book makes a very good read. It is also just a good book in general and it is very plant and nature based.

Encyclopedia of Magical Herbs by Scott Cunningham

I use this resource regularly, it is probably my most-used resource. Learn the magical properties of your everyday herbs at home. The index in the back is invaluable for figuring out which herbs to use for your spells.

Encyclopedia of Magical Stones by Scott Cunningham

The rock version of the herbal encyclopedia.

The Element Encyclopedia of Witchcraft by Judika Illes

This elemental encyclopedia is excellent to educate yourself more about witchcraft. Just to warn you, if you read many of her books, some of the content is copied over between them.

The Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells by Judika Illes

This book is massive. Not only does it really have 5000 spells, but it also has a formulary in the back with recipes on many oils, potions, and powders you can craft. It also has an excellent section on how to cast spells and how to use a wide variety of ritual tools.

Encyclopedia of Spirits by Judika Illes

So this book is seriously an awesome encyclopedia, especially for looking up spirits by name. It’s general entries – such as for “mermaid” or “ghost” are somewhat disappointing. The real value of this book is being able to look up arcane and archaic spirits by name. It has a lot of info on gods as well.

Pure Magic by Judika Illes

I wish someone had handed me this book when I first got started in witchcraft. If you are done with 101 posts on tumblr and ready for your next introductory step, buy a copy of this book. It is a “complete course in spellcasting.” This book delivers.

Spiritual Cleansing by Draja Mickaharic

This is an interesting book to read because it is not witchcraft; it is it’s own spiritual system. If you are looking for something new and want to expand your horizons, grab this book. You won’t be disappointed. As a handbook on spiritual cleansing, it’s techniques do not disappoint either.

Letters from the Devil’s Forest by Robin Artisson

This book is seriously so cool. If you are ready for your next intermediate step in to witchcraft, if theory interests you, if you want to read about a real witch’s experiences – pick up this book. It is not a spellbook nor a how-to guide. It’s just incredibly interesting.

The Horn of Evenwood by Robin Artisson

A great spellbook, especially for diabolists, those that want to travel to the underworld, and those that want to meet the devil himself. I would call this more of an intermediate spellbook, and while any beginner should educate themselves, it is perhaps best to wait until you have a little more experience before you tackle the rituals in this book.

A Dictionary of Angels by Gustav Davidson

This book is in my opinion especially important for Christian practitioners or any practitioner who works with angels and/or demons. It is an extremely thorough dictionary of angels and fallen angels.

Power Within The Land and Earth Light by R. J. Stewart

If you’re in to faeries, these two books are for you. They detail how to travel to Faery, how to interact with faeries, and how to transform yourself with faery magic.

The Living World of Faery by R. J. Stewart

A super interesting book. If you are in to faeries, get this book by R. J. Stewart instead of the other two – which are more similar to spellbooks. This book will educate you a lot about real faery lore.

The Devil’s Dozen by Gemma Gary

What can I say, I love Gemma Gary. The Devil’s Dozen is a fascinating book containing thirteen original rituals dedicated to the Witch’s Devil, Bucca. This book is more for diabolists and traditional witches, but if you find a copy of it, grab it. It will go well in any practitioner’s library. I would consider this book more for the intermediate practitioner, but people of all skill levels will benefit from reading it.

Traditional Witchcraft by Gemma Gary

This is “the” book on Cornish witchcraft. It is useful for anyone interested in traditional witchcraft and those seeking a more traditionally based path. This book does have some spells and rituals in it, but it’s main purpose is in describing Cornish ways.

The Black Toad by Gemma Gary

This book goes hand in hand with Traditional Witchcraft. It is a spellbook and so does not describe Cornish ways so much, but it does give you practical magical applications. This book is very traditional and not modified to make it more appetizing to modern crowds. I would readily recommend it in order to see how a very traditional witch practices.

Wicca: A Guide for the Solitary Practitioner by Scott Cunningham

If you are interested in Wicca, this is the book for you. It describes how to practice Wicca for – well – a solitary practitioner. I don’t have a lot to say about it, but it certainly ended up in my library for a reason.

Protection & Reversal Magick by Jason Miller

I am such a Jason Miller fangirl. He is a clear and concise writer. He doesn’t waste your time. This book was my first magical book and I still reference it regularly. I would highly advise any practitioner – especially a beginner – pick up this book. It will not steer you wrong and may save you a lot of trouble.

Financial Sorcery by Jason Miller

This is the only real financial spellbook I have seen of it’s type. Rather than throwing money spells at you, Miller explains how to use magic to create real and lasting wealth. He explains why many money spells never seem to get you ahead in life and helps you craft your own magic so you can actually get ahead.

The Sorcerer’s Secrets by Jason Miller

This book is about how to cast magic, how magic works, and how to be a badass sorcerer. If I could go back and re-work my path I would pick up this book right away. It has heavily influenced my beliefs and made me a better practitioner.

Seven Spheres by Rufus Opus

If you are interested in magic besides witchcraft, this book on hermeticism is excellent. It teaches you about the “seven spheres” and how to summon the planetary spirits and intelligences to aid your life. Having performed the rituals in this book, I can say that they are extremely powerful. If you are looking for magic to radically change your life, this is the book for you.

The Practical Psychic Self-Defense Handbook by Robert Bruce

This book is not witchcraft, it is more on the psychic spectrum of practice. It gets in to really intense defense mechanisms and I have succesfully used his techniques to keep me safe.

Correspondences by Sandra Kynes

This is a very neat reference book. It lists how correspondences are related to one another. It is difficult to explain, but it is a really neat book if you want to research how plants, animals, gods, stones, colors, numbers, etc., are interrelated.

Dream Protection with Basic Botanicals

The following botanicals enhance sleep, or at least won’t disturb it, while simultaneously creating a spiritual shield to protect you while you sleep: 

  • Angelica 
  • Anise 
  • Black mustard seeds 
  • Cloves 
  • Henna 
  • Mugwort 
  • Purslane 
  • Rosemary 
  • Rue 
  • Saint John’s Wort 
  • Southernwood 
  • Sweet Annie 
  • Sweet flag (calamus) 
  • Vervain 
  • Wormwood 
  • Yarrow 

Use one or any combination of the above to fill a dream pillow.

-  Illes, Judika - Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells

[Revised 11/16] Book Recommendations for Witches

Greetings, all. Quite some time ago, I created an annotated bibliography of some of my favorite texts on magical subjects. I was browsing it a few days ago and quickly realized, though, that it had become woefully out-of-date. There were quite a few books I’d only recently finished reading that belonged on the list! 

So, I’ve made an updated version here! Below, you can find my book recommendations, organized into loose categories. I’ve had to add a few new categories since last time, and expand several others. I do plan on doing long-form book reviews on some of these titles, and if there’s a particular one listed that you’d like to see a long review for, please let me know and I’ll work on that.

I hope you find something on here that suits your fancy! Happy reading!

For Absolute Beginners

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

The Modern Guide to Witchcraft, by Skye Alexander. Great book for those who’re really absolute beginners and are wondering what witchcraft is all about. Skye takes a very postmodern, utilitarian, and unfailingly honest approach, and it’s geared towards those of almost any belief system.

Grimoire for the Apprentice Wizard, by Oberon Zell-Ravenheart. Attractively packaged and readible for almost all ages, this is a great (mostly) non-denominational look at the foundations of magical practice. It’s extremely detailed. Some of it only applies to Zell’s own tradition, but it’s quite useful, anyways.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Sorcerer’s Secrets, by Jason Miller. This is a decent volume that describes a lot of techniques you don’t usually see in books, such as gesture and gaze-based magick. Be warned that Miller writes extensively about manipulative techniques, but it’s useful theory regardless of how you put it into practice.

Witch’s Bag of Tricks, by Melanie Marquis. This is not recommended for beginners, because the whole point of this book is to help existing practitioners refine and improve their already-established techniques. It’s got some novel ideas in it, and I like the author’s approach to symbolism in spellcasting.

Direct Magick (Energy Work)

The Un-Spell Book, by Mya Om. This non-denominational guide to working with magical forces is filled with useful exercises that go beyond the author’s previous work. I recommend reading this after reading Energy Essentials.

Instant Magick, by Christopher Penczak. Excellent beginner’s guide for those who don’t have access to a lot of fancy tools or prefer to work without them. This book won’t instantly teach you magick, but it will help even a seasoned practitioner find quicker, less-complicated ways of achieving results.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Magical Writing, Words, and Symbols

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

The Modern Witchcraft Grimoire, by Skye Alexander. This book is for those who want to create their own grimoire. It gives fairly good advice for doing so, as well as providing hints and tricks for spellcasting and useful correspondences.

General Concepts

Planetary Magick, by Melita Denning and Osborne Phillips. If you want to work with the planets at all, particularly in a highly ritualized context, I recommend this book. It’s large, comprehensive and gives a good foundation beyond what you find in general astrology books.

Practical Planetary Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Shorter than I would have liked, but a useful reference to have on your shelf, with excellent tables and appendices in the back. The meditations are also quite useful.

Practical Elemental Magick, by Sorita d’Este and David Rankine. Should be read alongside the other book by this pair. Comprehensive guide to working with the elements in a ritualized fashion. Not as accessible to newbies as Lipp’s book, but good for seasoned practitioners.

The Way of Four, by Deborah Lipp. Though mostly geared towards Wiccans, I found this author’s in-depth treatment of the four elements highly fascinating. I will note that it’s probably best to get the print version of this book, as it contains exercises and quizzes.

Ingredients and Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Book of Spells, by Nicola Pulford. In most editions, this book is absolutely gorgeous and describes spellcasting traditions from a variety of perspectives and traditions. Recommended for those who already understand the basics, as this book jumps straight into spellcasting and gives only a small amount of information about how things work.

Ceremonial Magick

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

Familiar Spirits, by Donald Tyson. Though geared towards ceremonialists, any practitioner can likely learn a thing or two from Tyson’s interesting stroll through the whys and wherefores of spirit work and thoughtform creation. This is by far the best book I’ve seen on the topic of familiar spirits.

Secrets of High Magick, by Francis Melville. The most recent edition of this (the one I own) is lavishly-illustrated and full of rudimentary, yet useful information. He stresses the basics of ceremonial practice, and his writing style is very accessible. Highly recommended for absolute beginners.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I have major issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Chaos Magick

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonautin order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

Pop Culture Magic 2.0 by Taylor Ellwood. There aren’t a lot of books on using pop culture symbolism in magick, but this one is nearly perfect. The author writes in a highly erudite, literate fashion, while still being accessible to newbies. Many useful resources cited, as well, so prepare to branch off a bit while reading it.

History-Related

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

Assorted Spells to Protect Domestic Animals From Malevolent Magic

  • Build your barn near birch trees
  • If the barn is already standing, transplant birch trees nearby
  • Adorn the birch trees, or other nearby trees, with red and white ribbons
  • Surround the barn with lilies and primroses. (Maintain them, replacing as needed.)
  • Bury a hatchet, sharp side up, under the barn’s threshold, so that the animals must walk over it as they enter and depart
  • Horseshoes protect animals as well as humans.
  • Post them over the barn door. The Hungarian method is to draw a horseshoe over the barn door using black chalk
  • Keep a piece of real silver in a dish or bucket of water, out of reach of the animals. This may be a small charm or a real silver coin. Once a week, sprinkle the animals with this water, then replace with fresh water
  • Sprinkle the animals with Rose of Jericho Water once a week

(from The Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes)

Cleansing Powder

This powder helps eliminate negative emotions, vibrations, and low-level spirit emanations. Powders are sprinkled through an area to radiate a cleansing effect as well as to absorb malignancies in the air. Use alone, or as a follow-up to a banishing powder to help remove any residual negativity. 

Exorcism Powder:

Mix together the following ingredients and grind into a fine powder.

  • dried basil
  • frankincense
  • rosemary
  • rue
  • yarrow

Blend this mixture into arrowroot powder and sprinkle as needed. 

from The Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells

(need a protection powder?)

An exhaustive list of books for the advanced witch.

Occultism, Witchcraft, and Cultural Fashions: Essays in Comparative Religions by Mircea Eliade

Evolutionary Witchcraft by T. Thorn Coyle

Advanced Witchcraft: Go Deeper, Reach Further, Fly Higher by Edain McCoy

Witches, Midwives, and Nurses: A History of Women Healers by Barbara Ehrenreich and Deirdre English

The Veil’s Edge: Exploring the Boundaries of Magic by Willow Polson

Deepening Witchcraft: Advancing Skills & Knowledge by Grey Cat

Kissing the Limitless by Thorn Coyle

The Sea Priestess by Dion Fortune

The Training & Work of an Initiate by Dion Fortune

The Second Circle: Tools for the Advancing Pagan by Venecia Rauls

The Otherside of Virtue by Brendan Myers

Psychic Self-Defense by Dion Fortune

Curse Tablets and Binding Spells from the Ancient World by John G. Gager

Wicca 333: Advanced Topics in Wiccan Belief by Kaatryn MacMorgan

The Elements of Ritual: Air, Fire, Water & Earth in the Wiccan Circle by Deborah Lipp

777 And Other Qabalistic Writings of Aleister Crowley: Including Gematria & Sepher Sephiroth by Aleister Crowley

Treading the Mill: Practical Craft Working in Modern Traditional Witchcraft by Nigel G. Pearson

Mastering Witchcraft by Paul Huson

The Call of the Horned Piper by Nigel Aldcroft Jackson

Masks of Misrule: The Horned God & His Cult in Europe by Nigel Jackson

The Pillars of Tubal Cain by Nigel Jackson

The Roebuck in the Thicket: An Anthology of the Robert Cochrane Witchcraft Tradition by Evan John Jones

The Robert Cochrane Letters: An Insight into Modern Traditional Witchcraft by Robert Cochrane

Secrets of East Anglian Magic by Nigel Pennick

Jambalaya: The Natural Woman’s Book of Personal Charms and Practical Rituals by Luisah Teish

The Element Encyclopedia of 5000 Spells: The Ultimate Reference Book for the Magical Arts by Judika Illes

HEKATE: Keys to the Crossroads – A collection of personal essays, invocations, rituals, recipes and artwork from modern Witches, Priestesses and Priests by Sorita D’Este

The Satanic Witch by Anton Szandor LAVey

Advanced Wicca: Exploring Deeper Levels of Spiritual Skills and Masterful Magick by Patricia Telesco

The Meaning of Witchcraft by Gerald Brosseau Gardner

The Study of Witchcraft: A Guidebook to Advanced Wicca by Deborah Lipp

Progressive Witchcraft by Janet Farrar and Gavin Bone
*
The Crossroads in Folklore and Myth by Martin Puhvel

When the Drummers Were Women: A Spiritual History of Rhythm by Layne Redmond

The Night Battles: Witchcraft & Agrarian Cults in the Sixteenth & Seventeenth Centuries by Anne Tedeschi

A Razor for a Goat: Problems in the History of Witchcraft and Diabolism by Elliot Rose

Ecstasies: Deciphering the Witches’ Sabbath by Carlo Ginzburg

Popular Religion in Late Saxon England: Elf Charms in Context by Karen Louise Jolly

The Return of the Dead: Ghosts, Ancestors, and the Transparent Veil of the Pagan Mind by Claude Lecouteux

Contemporary Paganism: Listening People, Speaking Earth by Graham Harvey

Athenian Popular Religion by Jon D. Mikalson

Greek Folk Religion by Martin P. Nilsson

Homo Necans: The Anthropology of Ancient Greek Sacrificial Ritual and Myth by Walter Burkert

The Greek Way of Death by Robert Garland

The Odyssey by Homer

The Iliad by Homer

Theogony, Works and Days by Hesiod

The Histories, Revised by Herodotus

Popular Magic: Cunning-folk in English History by Owen Davies

Myths and Symbols in Pagan Europe: Early Scandinavian and Celtic Religions by Hilda Roderick Ellis Davidson

The Well and the Tree: World and Time in Early Germanic Culture by Paul C. Bauschatz

Carmina Gadelica by Alexander Carmichael

Greek and Roman Necromancy by Daniel Ogden

Rotting Goddess: The Origins of the Witch in Classical Antiquity by Jacob Rabinowitz

The Silver Bough by F. Marian MacNeil

The Golden Bough: A Study in Magic and Religion by James Frazer

The White Goddess by Robert Graves

Myth and Sexuality by Jamake Highwater

The Homeric Hymns by Homer

The Wisdom of the Outlaw by Joseph Falaky Nagy

Harvest Home by Thomas Tryon

Trioedd Ynys Prydein: The Triads of the Island of Britain by Rachel Bromwich

Lady With A Mead Cup by Michael Enright

Women’s Religions in the Greco-Roman World: A Sourcebook by Ross Shepard Kraemer

Auraicept na n-Éces: The Scholars Primer by George Calder, ed.

A Guide to Early Irish Law by Fergus Kelly

The Tain by tr. by Thomas Kinsella

The Banshee: The Irish Death Messenger by Patricia Lysaght

Sex and Marriage in Ancient Ireland by Patrick C. Power

The Fairy-Faith in Celtic Countries by W. Y. Evans Wentz

The Secret Commonwealth and the Fairy Belief Complex by Brian Walsh

Beyond Celts, Germans, and Scythians by Peter S. Wells

Tales of the Elders of Ireland by Ann Dooley and Harry Roe, trans.

The Celtic Heroic Age by John T. Koch and John Carey, eds.

The Poetic Edda

The Prose Edda

Society and Politics in Snorri Sturluson’s Heimskringla by Sverre Bagge

Feud in the Icelandic Saga by Jesse L. Byock

The Secret Commonwealth of Elves, Fauns and Fairies by Andrew Lang

The Way of Wyrd by Brian Bates

The Real Middle-Earth: Magic and Mystery in the Dark Ages by Brian Bates

Gods of Love and Ecstasy: The Traditions of Shiva and Dionysus by Alain Danielou

Pagan Dream Of Rennaissance by Joscelyn Godwin
*
Spiritual Mentoring: A Pagan Guide by Judy Harrow

Loneliness & Revelation by Brendan Myers

The Pagan Book of Living and Dying: Practical Rituals, Prayers, Blessings, and Meditations on Crossing Over by Starhawk

A World Full of Gods: An Inquiry into Polytheism by John Michael Greer

Exploring the Pagan Path: Wisdom from the Elders by Kristin Madden, Starhawk, Raven Grimassi, and Dorothy Morrison

Between the Worlds edited by Sian Reid
*
The Gaelic Otherworld by John Gregorson Campbell, ed. by Ronald Black

The Visions of Isobel Gowdie: Magic, Shamanism and Witchcraft in Seventeenth-century Scotland by Emma Wilby

Dreamtime: Concerning the Boundary Between Wilderness and Civilization by Hans Peter Duerr

The Underworld Initiation: A journey towards psychic transformation by R. J. Stewart

Power Within the Land: The Roots of Celtic and Underworld Traditions Awakening the Sleepers and Regenerating the Earth by R. J. Stewart

The Tree of Enchantment: Ancient Wisdom and Magic Practices of the Faery Tradition by Orion Foxwood

The Woman in the Shaman’s Body: Reclaiming the Feminine in Religion and Medicine by Barbara Tedlock

Shamanism: Archaic Techniques of Ecstasy by Mircea Eliade

Walkers Between the Worlds: The Western Mysteries from Shaman to Magus by Caitlin Matthews

Plant Spirit Wisdom: Shamans and Sin eaters, Celtic Techniques for Healing the Soul by Ross Heaven

The Wiccan Mystic by Ben Gruagach

To Fly by Night edited by Veronica Cummer

Nine Worlds of Seid-Magic: Ecstasy and Neo-Shamanism in North European Paganism by Jenny Blain

Cunning-Folk and Familiar Spirits: Shamanistic Visionary Traditions in Early Modern British Witchcraft and Magic by Emma Wilby

Sacred Mask Sacred Dance by Evan John Jones
*
Circles, Groves and Sanctuaries by Dan and Pauline Campanelli

Hoodoo Herb and Root Magic: A Materia Magica of African-American Conjure by Catherine Yronwode

Sticks, Stones, Roots & Bones: Hoodoo, Mojo & Conjuring with Herbs by Stephanie Rose Bird

Mastering Herbalism: A Practical Guide by Paul Huson

Encyclopedia of Natural Magic by John Michael Greer

The Tree of Meaning: Language, Mind and Ecology by Robert Bringhurst

Leechcraft: Early English Charms, Plantlore and Healingby Stephen Pollington

Learning Their Language: Intuitive Communication with Animals and Nature by Marta Williams

The Meaning of Herbs: Myth, Language & Lore by G. & Field, A. Scoble

The Lost Language of Plants: The Ecological Importance of Plant Medicines to Life on Earth by Stephen Buhner

The Essential Guide to Herbal Safety by Simon Mills, Kerry Bone
*
By Standing Stone and Elder Tree: Ritual and the Unconscious by William G. Gray also known as Rollright Stone and Elder Tree

Magical Ritual Methods by William G. Gray

The Sacred and the Profane: The Nature of Religion by Mircea Eliade

Hekate Liminal Rites: A Study of the rituals, magic and symbols of the torch-bearing Triple Goddess of the Crossroads by David Rankine

Circles of Power: Ritual Magic in the Western Tradition by John Michael Greer

Book Recommendations for Witches

I’m often asked to recommend books on various topics, and really, these requests are extended exercises in frustration for me. Any book I read will almost certainly contain something I disagree with, and I worry that recommending one will give the appearance that I support it wholeheartedly. Even if it is a treasured book of mine (such as something by Judika Illes), I’ll likely find some issue with it, and it’s often not worth the trouble to recommend something and then need to qualify it. 

Still, I get this request often enough that I thought I’d make a list of the books I’ve read that I believe to be worth reading for witches and generally useful. As I’ve said, I don’t 100% agree with everything written in any of these books, and a lot of judgment is necessary for any reader, but still, they’re worth a look, in my opinion. 

Another note: I’ve limited myself to listing books useful to those practicing witchcraft. I’ve listed a few Thelema and ritual magick books, but only those that I believe are most relevant. There are lists I could make of books on various other topics (divination, or a more in-depth one for ceremonial magick), but I recognize that my readership is largely witches, thus this is what I’m putting up. Do expect future lists on other topics, though.

Basic Techniques

Protection and Reversal Magick, by Jason Miller. This gets a little woo-woo at times, but he gives good advice on how to avoid serious problems that can come up as you begin to practice. Take with a grain of salt, though - some of this has the potential to make you feel paranoid.

City Magick, by Christopher Penczak. If you’re at all interested in tech witchery, or just want to practice magick within an urban setting, do check this out. It is by far the best look at the subject I’ve seen, and his discussion of urban tutelary spirits is worth the price alone.

Composing Magick, by Elizabeth Barrette. A very general, but well-done, look at writing in a magical context. Some of the ritual templates are slightly specific to religious witchcraft traditions, but most information is widely applicable.

Crafting Magick with Pen and Ink, by Susan Pesnecker. Focuses both on the physical act of writing as a magical act, and the mental state associated with it. Highly recommended

Power Spellcraft for Life, by Arin Murphy-Hiscock. Nicely done, quite secular book providing basic beginner information regarding writing original spells and workings. It does fall prey to the trap of just listing correspondences with little information at times, but also contains a great deal of detail about ritual timing, raising power, and other topics essential for the beginner.

Energy Essentials for Witches and Spellcasters, by Mya Om. Though I balk at the use of the term “energy” to describe magical forces, this book is worth a look. It’s a bit like a workbook, with various exercises. Expect a lot of pseudoscience, though, and there are many religious references, but the techniques are solid.

Components/Correspondences

The Herbal Alchemist’s Handbook, by Karen Harrison. I cannot praise this book enough for its concise and well-formulated approach to astrology, herbs, and magick as a whole.

The Weiser Concise Guide to Herbal Magick, by Judith Hawkins-Tillirson. This is excellent for anyone who’s interested in any kind of magick. Yes, the focus is generally herbs, but there’s a lot to be learned here about Kabbalah and other correspondence systems, as well.

Mixing Essential Oils for Magic, by Sandra Kynes. Fills a very difficult gap in published knowledge regarding the use of essential oils by discussing, in great detail, how scents interact with each other and how to create a formula that’s not only palatable, but evocative.

Dunwich’s Guide to Gemstone Sorcery, by Gerina Dunwich. Given the New Age fascination with all things shiny, it was quite a chore to sort through the myriad crystal books to find something with good information. While far from perfect and not exactly devoid of fluff, this book does give a level of detail about the lore surrounding gemstones not seen in many other texts.

Real Alchemy, by Robert Allen Bartlett. Excellent book, lots of history and detail. There’s a strong focus on tradition within the text, yet the author is quite accommodating of his audience and describes alternate methods that work better in a modern context.

Spagyrics, by Manfred M. Junius. With a highly-developed academic tone and attention to detail, this book is a meaty look at traditional alchemy. I recommend this more for intermediate practitioners due to the sheer density of information.

Dictionary of Ancient Magic Words and Spells, by Claude Lecouteux. Mostly a historical text, this book isn’t exactly practical or terribly useful. It is, nevertheless, incredibly interesting. It’s a bit difficult to navigate, but worth a glance.

Spellbooks

The Goodly Spellbook, by Dixie Deerman and Steve Rasmussen. The title sounds horribly fluffy, but this is a hidden gem. It explains obscure concepts like alternative alphabets and potential uses of musical notes, as well as plant lore and other bits and pieces. Definitely worth checking out. It’s way more than just “a book of spells.”

Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells, by Judika Illes. The title sounds trite to some, but it delivers. This book has spells from almost every culture and spiritual philosophy, as well as a very detailed formulary. I read it when I’m bored sometimes, too, just because I always learn some tidbit from it.

Ceremonial, etc.

Modern Magick, by Donald Michael Kraig. I received this as a gift several years ago. It is essentially a workbook meant to be completed slowly, step by step, and while the format will not appeal to everyone, it’s a good easy-to-read introduction to ceremonial magick.

My Life With The Spirits, by Lon Milo DuQuette. This is a memoir of a ceremonial magician, but it gives a good look at the magickal mindset in a highly developed form from someone who’s experienced quite a lot. I have major issues with DuQuette’s approach to Qabalah, but his memoirs are worth a read.

Liber Null and Psychonaut, by Peter Carroll. Classic book of chaos magick. I consider it required reading for almost anyone interested in the occult. Even if you have no love for chaos magick, do give it a read, just to understand how influential Carroll is, and why.

Hands-On Chaos Magic, by Andrieh Vitimus. Knowing some of the people involved in the creation of this book, I’m a bit biased towards it. That said, even if I didn’t know them, I would still recommend it. It’s especially interesting to read alongside Liber Null and Psychonaut in order to see how the chaos “current” has developed over the years.

History-Related

Encyclopedia of Witchcraft, by Judika Illes. Even better than the Weiser Field Guide to Witches - this book is huge and chock-full of information. It’ll explain in easy-to-understand language how the concept has developed throughout time, why witches do what they do, and different types of witches.

The Weiser Field Guide to Witches, by Judika Illes. This gives an excellent look at the historical lore concerning witches, from the perspective of a witch herself. It’s kind of tongue-in-cheek, but it does have some information that won’t be found elsewhere.

Triumph of the Moon, by Ronald Hutton. An inside no-holds-barred look at the history of Wicca and Modern paganism. Highly recommended. This is sort of the book that fluffbunnies don’t want you to read.

Book of Lies: The Disinformation Guide to Magick and the Occult, by Richard Metzger. Lots of facts and history of magick in the context of Postmodernity. This is different from the Crowley text of the same name, which I wouldn’t recommend unless you want to focus on his tradition.

The Place of Enchantment, by Alex Owen. This is a purely historical text that documents the occult revival within the context of Modernity. I remember it being very good, but please realize I haven’t really picked it up much since graduating, and it might just have served my mindset at the time.

3

If you’ve never had a milk & honey bath before, this one is my fave. My skin always feels super soft & smells amazing plus it helps me relax & thus sleep a little better.
Run a bath, light some candles & incense & soak while listening to music, makes me feel like a goddess🌙
Spell source: Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells

Banish Evil Spell

Sometimes it’s not clear what or who needs to be banished. There’s just a prevailing sense of evil that needs to be expelled. This spell is most effective during the Dark Moon. An iron hammer is required, as is a flat rock, and either a coffin nail or an old rusty nail.

  1. Hammer the nail against the rock. The goal is not to pierce the rock but merely to score it three times across the face. Visualize what you are dispelling while you hammer.
  2. Bury the stone far away.
  3. Carry the nail in a red mojo bag, together with some crossroads’ and/or graveyard dirt.

(from The Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes)

Cover botanicals with boiling water and let steep for at least an hour. Stand in the tub and splash the lukewarm infusion over your body. Soak in the tub. Bathe prior to or the night before the interview for confidence. 

*use discretion with amounts of cinnamon, cloves, etc. if you have sensitive skin. 

From The Element Encyclopedia of 5,000 Spells by Judika Illes.