emydidae

Trachemys scripta elegans “Red-eared Pond Slider” Emydidae

Washington Park Arboretum, Seattle, WA
May 9, 2016
Robert Niese

Red-eared Sliders are a distinct subspecies of Pond Slider popular in the pet industry. Originally native to the southern US, these animals have been introduced to nearly every state including Hawaii, Puerto Rico, and Guam. As such, they are on the IUCN’s list of the 100 most invasive species in the world. They have not yet been reported in Montana, Alaska, Wyoming, Utah, Nevada, or North Dakota. If you see a Red-eared Slider in one of these states, contact your state’s Fish and Wildlife department immediately. Here in the PNW, these turtles out-compete native Western Painted Turtles (Chrysemys picta bellii) and the threatened Western Pond Turtle (Actinemys marmorata).

Blanding’s Turtle (Emydoidea blandingii)

Also recorded as Emys blandingii, Blanding’s turtle is an endangered species of semi-aquatic marsh turtle (Emydidae) which is native to North America, where it occurs mainly in the great lakes region, extending into central Nebraska and Minnesota. Like many other members of its family, Blanding’s turtles are primarily encountered in wetlands, typically with clean shallow water. They are also known to wander far from water, primarily during the nesting season. Blanding’s turtles are omnivorous, feeding on a range of freshwater invertebrates, carrion, berries and other plant matter .

Currently Emydoidea blandgingii is listed as endangered by the IUCN, as it faces major threats from habitat fragmentation/destruction as well as nest predation by introduced predators. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Testudines-Emydidae-Emydinae-Emydoidea-E. blandingii

Image: Me!

Hispaniolan Slider (Trachemys decorata)

Also sometimes known as the Hatian Slider, the Hispaniolan slider is a species of pond turtle (Emydidae) which is endemic to the Dominican Republic and Haiti (Hispaniola). Hispaniolan sliders are a freshwater species inhabiting freshwater ponds, lakes, and rivers and feeding on a range of aquatic insects, vegetation, and occasionally fish. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Testudines-Emydidae-Deirochelyinae-Trachemys-T. decorata

Image: Brian Gratwicke