employer discrimination

15 Trans People who Have Made History

I feel it is extremely important to know about the people in our community who came before us. Throughout history trans people have made history by acting as activists, advocates, and just by being themselves in a world at that against them. This list is by no means complete but the point is to highlight some of the trans people who have made history for our community. 

1) Frances Thompson: Frances was most likely the first trans person to testify before a congressional committee in the US. In 1866 she was a victim of the Memphis Riot. The riot occurred when a group of white men went into a neighbourhood where former slaves, such as Frances, lived. They burned buildings and attacked the former slaves. It was on this matter that she testified before the committee. Ten years later she was arrested for “transvestism.”

2) Lucy Hicks Anderson: Lucy was born in 1886 and began living as a woman a young age. She was first married in 1929 and then attempted to get married again in 1944.However, in 1944 her marriage was denied and she was accused of perjury for saying that she was a woman. After then she became one of the first fighters for marriage equality in America.

3) Marsha “Pay it No Mind” Johnson: Marsha is most known for being one of the leaders at the Stonewall Riot in 1969 however her involvement in the LGBT community stretches beyond that. She was the co-founder of S.T.A.R. which provided support and resources for homeless trans youth. She was also heavily involved in the Gay Liberation Front. She fought for LGBT rights and for people living with HIV and AIDS. She supported the community until her life was cut short in 1992 under suspicious circumstances.

4) Sylvia Rivera: Sylvia was also one of the leaders at the Stonewall Riots. At only seventeen years old she co-founded S.T.A.R. She was also a founder of the Gay Liberation Front. She spent a lot of time advocating for trans people, drag queens, and other people who were not included in the mainstream gay rights movement including fighting against the exclusion of transgender people from the Sexual Orientation Non-Discrimination Act in New York. She was an advocate for the community until her death in 2002.

5) Miss Major Griffin-Gracy: Miss Major was another leader at the Stonewall Riots in 1969 and the community in New York at the time. In the late 1970s she moved to San Diego and started grassroots movements such as working with a food bank to serve trans women who were incarcerated, struggling with addiction, or were homeless. During the AIDS epidemic she provided people with healthcare and organized funerals often one or more a week.  In 1990 she moved to the San Francisco area where she worked with many HIV/AIDs organizations. In 2003 she began working at the Transgender GenderVariant Intersex Justice Project where she works to help transgender women who have been imprisoned. She continues to work as an activist to this day.

6) Hiromasa Ando: Hiromasa was a professional speedboat racer in Japan and publically transitioned when he was given permission to start competing as a male in 2002 becoming the first openly trans person in the sport. He also is one of the first openly trans athletes in the world. 

7) Aya Kamikawa: In 2003 Aya made history when she became the first openly transgender person to be elected into office in Japan. She has also worked for the LGBT community both as a politician and before as a committee member for Trans-Net Japan.

8) Trudie Jackson: Trudie Jackson is a long-time activist for the LGBT and Native American Communities. She has worked with the ASU Rainbow Coalition, the Native American Student Organization, The National LGBTQ Task Force, and the Southwest American Indian Rainbow Gathering. She has been the recipient of numerous awards including the Equality Arizona Skip Schrader Spirit of Activism Award, one of the 2013 Trans 100, and Echo Magazine’s 2013 Woman of the Year. She is a huge advocate for the Native American trans community.

9) Kim Coco Iwamoto: When elected to the Hawaiian Board of Education in 2006 she held the highest office of any openly trans person in America. She served two terms on the Board of Education and is now a commissioner on the Hawaii Civil Rights Commission.

10) Diego Sanchez: Sanchez was the first openly trans person to hold a senior congressional staff position on Capitol Hill in America when he was appointed by Barney Frank in 2008.

11) Kylar Broadas: Broadas is an attorney, professor, and the first openly trans person to testify in front of the U.S. Supreme Court when he spoke in support for the Employment Non-Discrimination Act in 2012. In 2010 he founded the Trans People of Color Coalition.

12) Isis King: She became the first openly trans person to be on America’s Next Top Model in 2008. Her openess and involvement in the show and involvement in the show attracted a lot of both negative and positive attention. She has continued to work as a model, role-model, and advocate for transgender people. 

13) Blake Brockington: Blake first made headlines when he became the first openly transgender high school homecoming king in North Carolina. He was also an activist for the LGBT community, transgender youth and fought against police brutality. Sadly, Brockington lost his life at the age of 18 in 2015 after committing suicide.

14) Diane Marie Rodriguez Zambrano: She has been a human rights and LGBT rights activist in Ecuador for many years. In 2009 she sued the Civil Registry to change her name and set precedent for other trans people to be able to change their names. In 2013 she became the first openly trans person, or LGBT person, in Ecuador to run for office.

15) Ruby Corado: She is an activist born in El Salvador but living in America. She was involved in the Coalition to Clarify the D.C. Human Rights Act which was changed the act to include gender identity and expression. In 2012 she opened Casa Ruby which is the only bilingual and multicultural LGBT organization in Washington, D.C. She has been working for human rights for over 20 years.

npr.org
California Restaurants Launch Nation's First Transgender Jobs Program
The unemployment rate for transgender people is double that of the general population. A new program aims to change that. It's all because of a trans woman who's employed trans people for years.
2

Gay workers may lose promotions, raises because of bias toward their voice, study suggests

  • Gay men and lesbian women may be passed over for leadership positions, and possibly even raises, because of discrimination related to the sound of their voice, according to new research.
  • During the study, published in March by the Archives of Sexual Behavior, sample groups were provided pictures and recordings of a mix of different speakers, some heterosexual and some not. 
  • The respondents were asked to guess speakers’ sexual orientations based only on the images and voices.
  • Next, researchers chose the speakers who were most likely to be perceived as homosexual and the speakers who were most likely to be perceived as straight: 
  • In a follow-up study, researchers played a short recording of the two “types” of voices and had subjects answer a series of questions about the speakers’ qualifications for an executive job listing. Study participants also had to supply a monthly salary figure they thought was fair.
  • Overall, “applicants” perceived to be gay were assigned lower pay and were more likely to be rated “in adequate” for leadership roles, regardless of whether they were male or female. 
  • The researchers also asked whom subjects would prefer to associate with, and found evidence of bias toward gay men. Read more (3/21/17 3:12 PM)
2

Reports of people being fired for having HIV spiked in 2016. Trump could make it worse.

  • Advocates have made enormous progress in the past few decades when it comes to fighting workplace discrimination against people with HIV/AIDS, but unfortunately, incidents like this still happen with regularity. Since the height of the AIDS crisis in the mid-1980s, reports of workplace bias had fallen consistently. 
  • But after decades of steady decline, the number of cases jumped to 220 in 2016, up from 117 in 2015 — an increase of 88%. 

 
huffingtonpost.com
Missouri Women Could Soon Be Disqualified From Jobs Based On Reproductive Decisions
Legislators aim to undo an ordinance that prevents discrimination in jobs and housing.

Lawmakers in the Missouri Senate spent more than 10 hours in a closed-door special session last week to push through Senate Bill 5, a wide-reaching anti-abortion measure that—among other things—would roll back anti-discrimination protections for women in one of that state’s major cities.

The legislation would undo a relatively recent St. Louis ordinance that prohibits potential employers and landlords from discriminating against women based on their reproductive health history. In other words, if they’ve had an abortion. Or have used birth control. Or if they are pregnant.

When the ordinance first passed last February, supporters hailed it as necessary protection for women living in a deep-red state that is considered to be “hostile” to abortion rights. Unsurprisingly, it also drew sharp criticism from several local religious groups and leaders who lamented its passage as a “terrible moment” for the city of St. Louis. In May, the St. Louis Archdiocese and several other organizations filed suit against the city of St. Louis, seeking to overturn the ordinance

Now, just months later, anti-abortion legislators in the state appear poised to topple the ordinance. The bill—which also includes other anti-abortion measures that would affect women statewide—passed the Senate late last Wednesday and is now being heard in the House Children and Families Committee. The Kansas City Star reports that it could be passed without changes and sent to the governor directly, or undergo revisions that would require the House and Senate to negotiate the differences in a special conference.

NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri—the reproductive rights advocacy group, which fought for the anti-discrimination ordinance to be passed last winter—quickly announced it was launching an online and radio ad campaign criticizing Republican Gov. Eric Greitens who called the special session. (”Do you think your boss should be able to fire you for using birth control? Governor Greitens thinks so,” one ad claims.)

A spokesperson for the group told HuffPost that before the ordinance passed last winter, NARAL had not heard of any specific cases in which women were discriminated against because of their reproductive history. But the group had not been tracking the data closely before then either.

“Under the current political administration, we are seeing more threats against women for using birth control or having an abortion. We wanted to be proactive and protect them,” Kirstin Palovick, an organizing and policy associate with
NARAL Pro-Choice Missouri, told HuffPost in an e-mail. “Since the passage of this bill, we have had at least one person make a discrimination complaint based on their reproductive health care. We know the problem is happening, and we are beginning to hear more stories about it.”

“Baby Stark”

Pairing: Tony Stark x Reader

Summary: After returning to New York, Tony is greeted with surprising news that has potential to change his life.

A/N: another one from draft-purgatory. lol i’ve never written for tony stark, and i i struggle to capture his swaggering tone. however, but i thought it would be fun to write for a slightly softer tony stark.

His elbows resting on the metal railing surrounding the large helicopter landing pad, Tony Stark skims his eyes over the beautiful aerial view of Manhattan. A relaxed smile perks onto his lips as the familiar clamor of the concrete jungle sinks in. “It’s good to be back,” he hums to himself, taking in the majestic view carved around the Avengers Tower.

After rapping his knuckles against the metal railing, Tony saunters down the glass walkway leading into the tower, the eery silence reminding him that everyone is on a mission. He’s about to greet F.R.I.D.A.Y. when a smile enters his view, one that he isn’t expecting.

She sits on the counter of the bar, her legs elegantly crossed despite the restrictive nature of her pencil skirt. The sunlight streams into the room through the glass windows, creating a natural glow about her. A coy smile perks onto her lips as Tony’s drinks her in, his lower lip getting caught between his teeth as his eyes dance up her legs and body. She’s the most alluring girl he’d ever seen -he’d thought so two years ago when they first met, and he still thinks so now- and it’s one of the many reasons why he’s infatuated with her.

“I thought I told you not to wait for me,” He grins, glad that she ignored his request.

“I couldn’t wait until dinner, and I wanted to be here when you arrived. Is that such a crime?” (Y/N) hops off the counter and saunters towards him. She cups his cheek in a way that makes Tony feel like he’s the only person in the world.

“Well, counselor, I recommend -” His words are cut off as (Y/N) yanks the lapels of his jacket to bring his face towards her for a kiss. Tony laughs against her lips, but the laugh quickly gets drowned out by a rough growl as she lightly bites his lower lip. A smile creeps in around the edges of her kiss as she slides her hands down his muscular back. A nip of teeth, a glide of tongue, and she easily has him under her spell.

It’s only a matter of time when the need for oxygen brings the kiss to an end. Tony gently knocks his forehead against (Y/N)’s. “Remind me to always bring up a counterargument, because baby, I could get used to that,” he drawls.

(Y/N) laughs, a devilish glint lighting up her eyes. “Welcome back to New York, Mr. Stark. It’s been a while.” Her hand dangerously inch south as she brings his ear to her lips. “That was a little preview of what’s going to happen tonight.”

He feigns exasperation as (Y/N) playfully smacks his ass but twirls out of his arms before he can do anything. A low noise escapes his throat as she shoots him a sexy smile over her shoulder while kicking off her “ball-busting stilettos”, as she calls them.

Tony leans against the wall and watches (Y/N)’s shadow dance in the glow of the sun. Two years into the relationship, and he still gets butterflies. His fun, beautiful girlfriend, the skyline of the most magical city in America, wonderful weather - his life is perfect and Tony wishes it would stay this way for a long time.

“As much as I love pencil skirts, I need to change,” (Y/N) announces. “I have workout pants in my bag, but could I borrow a shirt or sweater?”

“Baby, at this point, you’ve stolen over half of my comfortable clothes. Why do you even bother asking?”

(Y/N) smirks and plants a kiss on his cheek before sashaying towards the door of Tony’s private apartment. Before she opens the door, she turns to him. “T, I have something to tell you.“

"Mmhmm,” Tony hums, pulling out his phone from his pocket.

“I probably should have told you, but I was kind of scared of how you would react. I thought it would be wise to tell you when you were back in New York.” She hesitates for a bit, her fingertips drumming against the doorframe. “Promise not to freak?” she asks, a slightly icy look glazing her eyes.

A small alarm rings in his head, but Tony maintains a calm expression. “I promise. Did you max out my credit card?” he jokes.

(Y/N) rolls her eyes but relaxes a bit, which pleases Tony. “No, and I never will.”

“My wallet thanks you, baby. But what’s up?”

“Tony.” She swallows. “How do you feel about becoming a dad?”

Keep reading

Antisemitic Employment Discrimination

I recently answered an anonymous ask that derided the idea that Jewish people experience employment discrimination, and have received some feedback from Jews who have experienced it:

[source: glitchbunny]

[source: myalchod]

Have an anecdote or information related to antisemitic employment discrimination you’d like to share? Send it in!

i’ve talked about this before but the model minority myth has functions beyond creating a schism between asians & other people of color or justifying racialized income/education inequality by using asians as a gotcha.

it serves to make asians (and asian labor) simultaneously invisible and exploitable, while obscuring capital-driven destruction and manipulation of asian laborers in asian countries. 

asians are invisible not just numerically; quantity is not a sufficient enough explanation for our invisibility because asian immigration to the US is increasing and we’re populating multiple urban and suburban centers. we are invisible because of how white supremacy, specifically in this case the model minority myth, works to portray us as obsequious, robotic, hardworking, emotionless, and quiet, not prone to resistance or protest of any form. white supremacy does this through exploitation of labor + a series of rewards and punishments, rewards being assimilation to american society (if that can truly be considered a reward) or punishments being not hired or accepted by employers and universities. 

here’s the thing. you have a wave of immigration from asian countries that encompass asians who are middle-class, educated, and probably know english. they have an easier (not an easy but easier) time settling into the country, adapting american norms, and becoming financially stable and successful. they are the face of the model minority myth - the asian doctors, bankers, engineers, etc, the ones who “remain quiet and work hard with their head held high”, and get “great grades in STEM subjects” and provide intellectual/technological labor to the flourishing markets. 

you also have a wave of asian immigrants who do not fit this picture. they know little to no english. they may be undocumented. they’re working-class and don’t have college degrees. these are the asians who live in places like edison, new jersey, or chinatown and koreatown in NYC, or dearborn, michigan. they’re the ones who run laundromats and dry-cleaning stores, drive your taxis and ubers, own cheaply priced restaurants and grocery stores, work in manufacturing, cut, dye, or style your hair, paint your nails, wax your facial hair, maintain and work at your gas stations, dunkin donuts, and 7/11 type convenience stores. 

how is it that the model minority myth can exist alongside the “indian 7/11 worker / chinese restaurant owner / korean dry cleaner / afghan nail lady / arab taxi driver” stereotypes? how can one group be simultaneously stereotyped as “privileged, educated, assimilated, hardworking, technical geniuses” AND “provincial, smelly, backward, poor, scary, cheap”? how can one group be invisible yet also stereotyped as the population-heavy thieves of ol red white n’ blue good american labor and education? how do you have asians who do “succeed” under american capitailsm and asians who are exploited and even killed by american capitalism? 

because of the model minority myth, which impacts the first vs second group in different ways. 

the first group does have to work really hard to get “acknowledgment” by the state/by white supremacy. consider why asian-american students suffer so much from mental illness and suicidality. we are driven to work hard to exceed expectations, to outpace white american labor, to justify our presence in the country. we need to please not only our parents and communities but also appease employers and admissions officers who think that there are too many of us. i’m sure you’ve heard of harvard’s quota on asian admission. the school i attend, the university of michigan, also has “a lot” of asian students and in fact i often hear white students complain about that. it’s a complaint i’ve heard my entire life. so that’s where you get studies that show that people with “asian sounding” names don’t get hired, or why asian students who are deemed “too similar” to the “asian average” (which is higher than the “white average” because we are held to a higher standard because of white mediocrity) don’t get accepted. universities have to make room for their white alumni and rich students and because white people hate affirmative action, the best solution for universities and employers is to discriminate against us. 

of course this all happens under a quota system which means that they’re still using our academic prowess and labor to enhance their reputations or profit. their logic is to accept just the “right” number of asians to, say, prettify their research program or attain skilled workers for some financial or technological company. the “right” number of asian workers or students will drive up the image or profit of a certain institution but it won’t offend white people or “take up” white space. 

the second group, the one that is impacted by poverty, homelessness, income inequality, etc, is invisible precisely because of the model minority myth. since the myth posits that ALL asians are equally privileged and educated, poor asians are veritably nonexistent. and these asians cannot defend themselves - they do not have the financial, political, or communicative means to do so (language and financial barriers prevent them from speaking out). terrified of poverty, deportation, instability, assault, or police brutality, these working-class asian americans are forced to remain silent because if they don’t they will also lose their job or home or risk the threat of actual physical retaliation. this then feeds into the “asians are robotic and obedient” stereotype as much as the first group, comprised of “smart asian students and workers” does. it’s an insidious cycle. 

so this is the dual-function of the model minority myth. we are made invisible by a deliberate stereotype pushed forth that obscures the reality of our diversity, and this invisibility allows us to be exploited, whether we are being exploited by universities or by multinational corporations or by startups or any other institution or employer. 

The fact that asexuals became a protected class in NY before trans people got rights that banned housing and employment discrimination against trans people (in fact a six year gap) shows how prioritizing cishets literally leads to less rights for actual lgbt people (in this case specifically trans people)

My dear lgbt+ kids, 

Here’s a hug for the poor/financially challenged lgbt+ kids. *hug*

“Money doesn’t buy happiness” can feel like a cruel joke when you have money trouble. We live in a world where money can buy some safety and freedom - and while poverty is not a issue for only lgbt+ people, it can hit lgbt+ people especially hard. 

So, here’s a hug for

- those who can’t afford to legally change their name

- those who can’t afford hormones or surgery 

- those who want to move away from hateful family but can’t afford to 

- those who can’t come out because they financially depend on their lgbt+-phobic family 

- those who want to quit their job but can’t risk to be jobless 

- those who have trouble to find jobs because employers discriminate

- those who can’t afford a binder or clothes they feel comfortable in 

With all my love, 

Your Tumblr Mom  

Donald Trump is now president — here are 8 guides to help you resist his agenda

Indivisible

Written by a group of progressive former congressional staffers, this guide takes the majority of its wisdom from an unlikely source: the Tea Party. “We saw these activists take on a popular president with a mandate for change and a supermajority in Congress,” the former staffers wrote about the Tea Party’s challenge to President Obama starting in 2009, shortly after he took office. “Their ideas were wrong, cruel and tinged with racism — and they won.”

So, taking a page from the Tea Party’s playbook, Indivisible offers practical dos and don'ts for people who want to challenge their elected officials. It urges activists to start and focus their efforts locally, because constituents are the people to whom every elected official is responsible.

Resistance Manual

This is a guide that was put together by Stay Woke — a branch of We, the Protesters, a group led by popular online activists DeRay McKesson and Netta Elzie. It’s a working document that lays out essential readings, issue areas and resources.

“The manual will grow over time as more and more people contribute updates, facts and resources to it,” McKesson wrote in an email announcing the manual’s release. “As such, we encourage you to contribute important information for others to read.”

Know Your Rights: Demonstrations and Protests

The right to peaceful assembly is a universal promise, but certainly not a guarantee. It’s a safe bet to expect civil disobedience to increase during Trump’s presidency. Big and small protests have already been happening in cities across the country, and those demonstrations are likely to get bigger and louder as Trump’s agenda unfolds in earnest. But the specifics of those protests are often hard to gauge. This guide, provided by the American Civil Liberties Union, helps with the nuts and bolts, such as how to secure permits, what restrictions need to be followed on private property and whether protesters have the right to take photos or videos during demonstrations.

Know Your Rights: What to Do if You’re Stopped by Police

Trump has promised to bring back law and order to America’s cities. But for many marginalized communities, that type of speech is just code for allowing law enforcement to wantonly stop, search and possibly arrest black and brown people — concerns for which there’s been plenty of precedent.

This is another guide from the ACLU. This one spells out what you have the right to ask and show police. Note that it’s never a certainty that those rights will be respected by a law enforcement officer during a confrontation, but this guide outlines your rights so you can at least know which of those rights are being violated and what violations to report later on.

Know Your Rights: Transgender People at Work

Trump has repeatedly vowed to repeal the Affordable Care Act, which could have dire consequences for millions of Americans. But transgender communities already felt the brunt of those consequences in December, when a federal judge in Texas halted protections for transgender Americans in Obamacare shortly before they were set to go into effect.

While that’s one tangible effect of a Trump presidency fundamentally altering what’s possible for transgender communities, another will be limiting — or even drawing back — federal protections in housing and employment. Sen. Jeff Sessions, Trump’s pick for attorney general, has a history of anti-LGBTQ sentiment, including his refusal to sign a voluntary nondiscrimination pledge. He also voted against the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, which would offer federal protection against gender identity discrimination in the workplace. This guide, again from the ACLU, offers general overviews of what employers can and can’t do as it relates to employees’ gender identity.

Digital Security Tips for Protesters

Smartphones have become an indispensable tool for protesters, whether it’s used to document police violence or simply challenge the mainstream media’s narrative of what’s happening on the ground. But technology also leaves protesters vulnerable to government surveillance. The Electronic Frontier Foundation is a nonprofit that focuses on civil liberties and technology, and its guide on digital security for protesters is a must-read. From how to send secure messages to friends to instructions for backing up your data and installing apps with strong encryption software, this guide has what protesters will need to make their voices heard.

How to apply for deferred action in the Trump era

It’s unclear what, exactly, will become of the Obama administration’s Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, the immigration program he enacted by executive order that helped hundreds of thousands of immigrant young people gain temporary relief from deportation.

Neither Sessions nor Trump’s nominee for secretary of Homeland Security, Gen. John Kelly, would say one way or another in their confirmation hearings that participants in the program would not be targeted by immigration officials. And Trump himself vowed to end the program while he was running for office. But, as of now, the program still exists, and is one of the only forms of protection for immigrant youths. The National Immigration Law Center updated their tips on how to apply shortly after Trump was elected.

“Over 700,000 people so far have opted to apply for and received DACA, and many of them have found better paying jobs, gotten driver’s licenses, and enjoyed other positive benefits,” the group says on its website. “Again, whether to apply for DACA is a personal choice, but here are some of NILC’s post-election recommendations.”

Tips for reporting incidents of Islamophobia

It’s no surprise, given the “build-the-wall-ban-the-Muslims” rhetoric that permeated Trump’s campaign, that hate crimes ticked upward after his election. The Council on American-Islamic Relations has a bunch of resources for people who want to report bias incidents, and also makes it easy to report those incidents so that CAIR can keep count of them.

read more | follow @the-movemnt

The clock has been turned back on racial progress in America, though scarcely anyone seems to notice. All eyes are fixed on people like Barack Obama and Oprah Winfrey, who have defied the odds and risen to power, fame, and fortune. For those left behind, especially those within prison walls, the celebration of racial triumph in America must seem a tad premature. More black men are imprisoned today than at any other moment in our nation’s history. More are disenfranchised today than in 1870, the year the Fifteenth Amendment was ratified prohibiting laws that explicitly deny the right to vote on the basis of race. Young black men today may be just as likely to suffer discrimination in employment, housing, public benefits, and jury service as a black man in the Jim Crow era–discrimination that is perfectly legal, because it is based on one’s criminal record.
—  Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow
Fat activism is about ending discrimination against fat people. If it helps people's self esteem, that's great. But it is not the end goal.

Just having better self esteem is not enough. 

It doesn’t address wage gaps and other employment discrimination. It doesn’t address the lack of access to medical care or basic clothing or the physical and emotional abuse. 

Yes, let’s all have better self esteem. If we can. But that’s not the end point. 

npr.org
Transgender Teachers Talk About Their Experiences At School
There's been a lot of national attention on transgender students this school year. Here's a look at the lives and careers of two transgender teachers.

Jenkins says over the next few years a pattern emerged: get a new job, then someone finds out, and — within the year — her contract isn’t renewed.

“In some of my classes, like half of my kids were pulled out.”

Jenkins says it wasn’t just the parents who were concerned that she was transgender. Her colleagues stopped including her in staff meetings.

Please Stop.

Okay, but the first HP book came out in 1997. That was almost twenty years ago. No, JKR was not fully aware of her white/straight/cis privilege at that time. She has had 20 years to get better. She also wrote the first draft on table napkins while working as a single mother of multiple children and receiving public support.

We are allowed to retrospectively critique her lack of inclusivity. We are also allowed to think that perhaps her awareness of the lack of said inclusivity has improved.

Just as a goddamn FOR EXAMPLE, in 1997, if Rowling had tried to pitch Dumbledore, a school headmaster, as openly homosexual, her book would never have been published. Want some evidence? I can do that.

Regulations were introduced for discrimination protections on sexual orientation in employment on 1 December 2003, following the adoption of an EC Directive in 2000, providing for the prohibition of discrimination in employment on the grounds of sexual orientation.

Right, so he (Dumbledore) could have been fired for being gay at any point prior to 2000, even assuming Wizarding law was keeping up with Muggle law, which is a goddamn stretch considering how shoddy trials and evidence are maintained throughout Auror procedurals.

And, regarding “she could have made more students of color in the first place,” um:

The Race Relations Act 1965 outlawed public discrimination, and established the Race Relations Board. Further Acts in 1968 and 1976 outlawed discrimination in employment, housing and social services, and replaced the Race Relations Board with Commission for Racial Equality[3] that merged into the Equality and Human Rights Commission in 2004. The Human Rights Act 1998 made organisations in Britain, including public authorities, subject to theEuropean Convention on Human Rights.[4] The Race Relations Act 2000 extends existing legislation for the public sector to the police force, and requires public authorities to promote equality.

After 2000, some argued that racism remains common, and some politicians and public figures have been accused of promoting racist attitudes in the media, particularly with regard to immigration, however race and immigration although related are not the same concepts.[5] There have been growing concerns in recent years about institutional racism in public and private bodies. Although various anti-discrimination laws do exist, according to some sources, most employers in the UK remain institutionally racist including public bodies such as the police[6] and the legal professions.[7][8]

I’m not saying “JKR has always been conscious of her White Privilege.” I’m not saying “she intended this from the start.” I’m saying, she started this fucking series when she was 25, she got it published when she was 32, and she is now fifty and has millions of dollars, resources, and feedback.

Hey, check it out: she’s had twenty-five years to learn.

Jo Rowling is a white British woman with a Bachelor of Arts in  French and Classics from the University of Exeter. It may very well have taken her this much time and this much exposure to the greater, wider world- outside her very white, very British influences in Tolkien and Dickens- to realize, “Oh, shit, I could/should have made my books more diverse, that’s such a lovely idea, my fans are so wonderful, I love their headcanons, they have taught me so much, I’m really lucky to have learned all of this.”

We want people to grow, don’t we? We want them to expand their minds and change. So can we please stop hating on people who weren’t born into the movement for finding it later?

Thanks.

7

What’s the Employment Picture for Asian American Pacific Islanders (AAPI) in the U.S.? 

Perhaps because Asian Americans earn fairly high incomes on average, people forget that they have weathered a history of employment discrimination and exclusion. 

[Top Chart] If one only examines unemployment rates, it is apparent that Asian Americans have done fairly well for themselves. In fact, on the whole, they have the lowest unemployment rate of any racial group, and in 2015, only about 4 percent of Asian Americans were counted as unemployed. By contrast, the second chart reveals that once you examine the share of Asian Americans who are considered the long-term unemployed (who are, incidentally, not counted in the regular unemployment figure because they’re not actively looking for a job), Asian Americans have the highest numbers unemployed. Why do Asian Americans experience the worst long-term unemployment? There are three explanations. First, about a third of all Asian Americans live in California, which has disproportionately high joblessness, both short-term and long-term. Second, there’s good old fashion immigrant bias, which is to say, employers prefer to hire U.S.-born workers. Third, there’s racial bias (Read more here).

One detail that often gets lost in any discussion of Asian Americans is that although Asians are perceived and categorized by most non-Asians as members of a cohesive racial group, the truth is that the people called “Asian” often have very different backgrounds and different immigration histories based on their country of origin. Looking at the third and fourth charts it’s clear that Asian Indians are well represented in management and professional occupations, whereas Vietnamese Americans have greater numbers in the service industry.

The fifth chart allows us to zero in on technology companies Google, Hewlett-Packard, Intel, LinkedIn, and Yahoo. Based on a sample size of nearly 140,000 professionals, managers, and executives, the chart reveals that while Asians made up 27.2 percent of the professional workforce at these five companies, they accounted for only 13.9 percent of top brass. For comparison, white men, not surprisingly, were above parity, meaning their representation at the executive level is at least equal to their representation in the professional workforce.

Yet despite all of this disparity–and thanks to some unusually high salaries for some Asian Americans–the average income of full-time Asian American workers is higher than white workers. The problem with this statistic is that is masks the disparity in earnings among Asian Americans. For example, as the bottom chart shows, Cambodians made only 56 cents on the white male dollar. 

cnn.com
Women's Day: Global rallies for equal rights
Women around the world are marking International Women's Day on Wednesday, with some wearing red to work and others taking the day off to go on strike or join rallies calling for equal rights.
By Eliza Mackintosh, CNN

“In the United States, some women are taking the day off from paid and unpaid labor in a strike billed as “A Day Without a Woman.” The action is aimed at showing the economic importance and impact of women on society. It was organized following the Women’s March on January 21, which saw huge crowds of demonstrators rally in Washington, DC, and around the nation, in a backlash against US President Donald Trump on his first full day in office. 

American women aren’t the only ones taking to the streets. In Ireland, where abortion is illegal in almost all circumstances, women and abortion rights activists wore black in a day of action dubbed “Strike 4 Repeal.”

In Australia, thousands of demonstrators attended a rally in Melbourne, demanding economic justice and reproductive rights for women around the world. In the Philippines, members of the women’s group Gabriela Party marched to the US embassy in Manila carrying signs calling for employment and discrimination reforms.” 

Read the full piece here

Disabled in Theresa May’s Britain #18: Anon

From England
 
My employer moved me into an inaccessible office which made me ill. They had ignored my access advice and actively avoided seeking professional advice. It was eventually deemed “not reasonable or practicable” to resolve the issues so I lost my job. The weakening of the Public Sector Equality Duty (PSED) parts of the Equality Act by the Coalition government means I had no legal basis to challenge the employer’s failure to consider mine and other disabled people’s needs. Overall the Equality Act is weak, difficult to enforce and compensation is miniscule in comparison to the short and long term financial loss I have suffered. The legal system encourages employers to bully and abuse claimants by methods such as denying our disability status, demanding information about our impairments, pretending not to understand access issues and claiming they have resolved issues which they haven’t.