emperor carlos v

@Neoprusiano
Emperador Carlos V del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico y I Rey de España
Imperator Carolus V Sacri Imperii Romani et I Rex Hispaniae
Kaiser Karl V. des Heiligen Römischen Reiches und I. König von Spanien
Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire and I King of Spain
Empereur Charles V de le Saint Empire Romain Germanique et I Roi d'Espagne

Edmond de Busscher (1805-1882), 1858.

2

Today in history - The birth of Charles V

Charles was born on 24 February 1500 in Ghent, Belgium,as the son of Philip of Burgundy and Joanna of Spain, and he inherited the thrones of the Habsburg posses-sions, Spain and the Netherlands.

As Holy Roman Emperor Charles V made a last attempt to revive the medieval universal empire. His opponennts were therefore the European national states; especially France; the German princes; the Turks; but also the Pope.

In 1525 Charles defeated Francis I of France; two years later Rome was sacked and the pope imprisoned, but now new dangers emerged from the East when the Turks laid siege to Vienna (1529). Eventually, the pope, Francis, and Charles agreed to a truce, but Charles’s league with the pope drove the Protestants to rebellion.

Charles defeated the German Protestants in 1547, but when France made an alliance with the North German rebels four years later, Charles’ empire was shattered. Disappointed, Charles divided the empire between his son (Philip II of Spain) and his brother (Emperor Ferdinand), retiring to the monastery of Yuste in Spain in 1555.

anonymous asked:

What is a hidalgo? I'm taking Spanish lit and it keeps coming up

The short answer is that in most cases, if your literature is Siglo de Oro lit, it means a member of petty nobility.

Without the cultural background, you can sort of think of it as “being given a noble title/peerage and not having an estate”.

The term is sometimes seen as fidalgo but it comes from hijo de algo “son of something/someone”. Originally, hidalgos (and hidalgas) were children of a specific kind of nobility, usually descendants of people who fought in the Reconquista. The term existed in what is modern day Spain and Portugal, but at the time it would have been Castile, Aragon, Leon, Galicia, Asturias… but focusing on some bigger city areas, but also including (technically, at the time) the Kingdoms of Naples and Sicily, and the Kingdom of Portugal.

EDIT: Most hidalgos came from what is now Northern Spain because the Reconquista was against the areas under Muslim control, the last bastion of this was Granada in Andalusia, in Southern Spain.

The Reconquista went on for a while and Castile and Aragon were joined by the marriage of Isabel [Isabella] of Castile and Fernando [Ferdinand] of Aragon but were considered different kingdoms at the time. In Aragon and other parts of Spain, you might also see the word infanzón and not hidalgo but in some contexts it’s sometimes synonymous with caballero which is “knight” or “gentleman”, though originally that term meant “horseman” or “someone who owned horses” aka someone with money enough to afford a horse and stables.

The title kind of lost most of its meaning because some kings were like “oh I like you, good job, here have a title”, and most of them didn’t hold actual land.

In Siglo de Oro time, the hidalgo was a kind of… specific symbol. It referred to a noble who usually didn’t have money or land.

Some did, but more didn’t. And they sort of became the symbol for Spain itself at the time.

The hidalgos that did have money tended to be first-born. In Spain there was the system of “primogeniture” which is “first born (son) takes most of the money and estate”. That usually left very little for the other siblings. It was really common for the first-born to become a don of the estate while male siblings typically went into the clergy, or the military. A female sibling often ended up marrying someone at her station or above, or became a nun (that’s not always how it went, some women were really instrumental in running the actual estates as far as giving orders or balancing the finances, but traditionally, or at least in a lot of fiction from the time, they were used as pawns for men).

The terms don “lord/sir” or doña “lady/madame were used for them. You sometimes would see la doncella which shows up now more in fairytales but meant “maiden” or “young (unmarried noble) lady”… at that time that title was used for (in a lot of cases) the nobility who had land.

Because they were nobles, in some way, shape, or form, some of them were tax exempt and if the Inquisition got involved in some way, they were exempt from torture (though historically the Inquisition did more land/money seizures than torturing people, and really their job was related to the subject of heresy).

A hidalgo who didn’t have the estate usually was considered noble in name but didn’t have the financial standing. In some cases, they had less to eat than the poor, or even some slaves. In some of Cervantes’ works the hidalgos were really poor; it’s implied that Don Quijote was closer to what we would consider the middle class, economically… he had some land (or at least a house), and a horse (though not a lot of money to feed Rocinante very well)… so he had land, but he certainly was not rich.

Most dons or doñas in the traditional sense were lords or ladies of an estate who oversaw tenant farmers or the administration of lands in some aspect, and the lesser ones served under the bigger lords like counts and dukes etc.

The hidalgos came to represent Spain which was having this huge literary cultural boom but were really poor at the time because most of the profits that they were getting from colonies was going to fund the Holy Roman Empire (the Holy Roman Emperor Carlos V [Charles V] was descended from Isabel and Fernando making unified Spain part of the Empire and Spain was seen as the heart of Catholicism outside of the Vatican/Rome), specifically money from the Spanish colonies was going towards all kinds of conflicts and wars with the Lutherans and Protestants in Germany, and Carlos V had more of a presence in Flanders than Madrid.


(I probably got one or two of the historical facts wrong here and there so please correct me if I’m wrong; the literary aspect of it all I’m pretty sure I got right)

@Neoprusiano
Emperador Carlos V del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico y I Rey de España
Imperator Carolus V Sacri Imperii Romani et I Rex Hispaniae
Kaiser Karl V. des Heiligen Römischen Reiches und I. König von Spanien
Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire and I King of Spain
Empereur Charles V de le Saint Empire Romain Germanique et I Roi d'Espagne

Peter Paul Rubens (1577-1640), 1635.

7

Joanna I of Castile, Philip the Handsome and their offspring:

  • Eleanor (1498-1558)
  • Charles (1500-1558)
  • Isabella (1501-1526)
  • Ferdinand (1503-1564)
  • Mary (1505-1558)
  • Catherine (1507-1578)
8

The descendants, and daughter-in-law, of Juana I of Castile as portrayed in ‘Carlos Rey Emperador’ with their actual signatures.

T->B: Joanna I of Castile, Emperor Charles V, Eleanor of Austria, Emperor Ferdinand I, Catherine of Austria, Mary of Austria, Philip II, Isabella of Portugal.

Royals from the English, French, and Spanish Courts

4

Philip II, King of Spain, was born at Valladolid on the 21st of May 1527. He was the son of the emperor Charles V and of his wife Isabella of Portugal. Philip received his education in Spain. His tutor, Juan Martinez Pedernales (Bishop of Cartagena), who latinized his name to Siliceo, and who was also his confessor, does not appear to have done his duty very thoroughly. The prince, though he had a good command of Latin, never equaled his father as a linguist. Don Juan de Zúñiga (grand-commander of Castile), who provided a more systematic education, imparting piety and seriousness to his pupil as well as an extensive knowledge of history and an appreciation of scholarship, the arts, and politics. From his earliest years Philip showed himself more addicted to the desk than the saddle and to the pen than to the sword. The emperor, who spent his life moving from one part of his wide dominions to another and in the camps of his armies, watched his heir’s education from afar. The trend of his letters was to impress on the boy a profound sense of the high destinies to which he was born, the necessity for keeping his nobles apart from all share in the conduct of the internal government of his kingdom, and the wisdom of distrusting counsellors, who would be sure to wish to influence him for their own ends. Philip grew up grave, self-possessed and distrustful and was rigidly abstemious in eating and drinking.

@Neoprusiano
Emperador Carlos V del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico y I Rey de España
Imperator Carolus V Sacri Imperii Romani et I Rex Hispaniae
Kaiser Karl V. des Heiligen Römischen Reiches und I. König von Spanien
Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire and I King of Spain
Empereur Charles V de le Saint Empire Romain Germanique et I Roi d'Espagne

Leone Leoni (1509-1590), 1550.

General reactions when people read about the Habsburg dynasty

Charles V (I in Spain)

People who are dazzled by his achievements on the battlefield:

Heretic people:

Philip II

Spanish ladies:

Turkish, portuguese, heretic and communist people: 

Philip III

Yes, normally, nobody gets excited reading about him.

Philip IV

People who thinks that all he did in life was to go to the brothel:

People who knows that he was interested in government issues too (and go to the brothel):

Charles II

The first time you see his portrait:

The second time you see his portrait:

The rest of times you see his portrait:

@Neoprusiano
Emperador Carlos V del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico y I Rey de España
Imperator Carolus V Sacri Imperii Romani et I Rex Hispaniae
Kaiser Karl V. des Heiligen Römischen Reiches und I. König von Spanien
Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire and I King of Spain
Empereur Charles V de le Saint Empire Romain Germanique et I Roi d'Espagne

Tiziano Vecellio (1490-1576), 1548.

@Neoprusiano
Emperador Carlos V del Sacro Imperio Romano Germánico y I Rey de España
Imperator Carolus V Sacri Imperii Romani et I Rex Hispaniae
Kaiser Karl V. des Heiligen Römischen Reiches und I. König von Spanien
Emperor Charles V of the Holy Roman Empire and I King of Spain
Empereur Charles V de le Saint Empire Romain Germanique et I Roi d'Espagne

(1557)