emma watson [10]

Beauty and the Beast
  • Me, before listening to the soundtrack: so beauty and the beast is gonna be amazing and the songs are gonna be beautiful
  • Me, after listening to the soundtrack: obi wan kenobi my dad i'll be your guest oh my gosh. LUPIN MAY NOT BE ABLE TO SING BUT HERMIONE SURE CAN! I want to marry this soundtrack please. Magic rose? Pffft who needs it I'm gonna marry it right now just make it legal please oh my word play this at my funeral. I am living. An actual 56 years has been added to my lifespan. What a beautiful cast and a beautiful album bless alan menken and all of them. I can die happy now. I want this at my wedding all of it please and thanks alright what is breathing I'm so emotional I hate my life
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favorite celebrities | [1/10] → Emma Watson
I am from Britain and think it is right that as a woman I am paid the same as my male counterparts. I think it is right that I should be able to make decisions about my own body. I think it is right that women be involved on my behalf in the policies and decision-making of my country. I think it is right that socially I am afforded the same respect as men. But sadly I can say that there is no one country in the world where all women can expect to receive these rights.

Top 10 misconceptions that I really hate hearing about “Beauty and the Beast”

Many things have been said in early reviews of Beauty and the Beast, but it seems that not even the original beloved cartoon is immune from nitpicking, criticisms, and people making their own interpretations about what the story means.  Here are ten of them I’ve seen, along with my responses to them.  

1. “It’s about Stockholm Syndrome.” As Emma Watson herself stated, Stockholm Syndrome tends to apply more to kidnapped victims that are subjected to trauma, being brainwashed and abused, until they wind up sympathizing with their captor.  Belle was not abused or brainwashed.  She doesn’t even like the Beast until he starts treating her with respect.

2. “It promotes toxic, abusive relationships.” Again, the Beast never hurts Belle. True, he does threaten to let her starve if she won’t each with him, but honestly, that was just him having a tantrum.  He never would have gone through with it; (in the Broadway musical, he’s contrite enough to bring her a dinner tray right to her room).  In any case, Belle doesn’t let him bully her; she repeatedly calls him out on his crap.

3. “It’s just like Twilight and Fifty Shades of Grey!” HOW DARE YOU?!

4. “LeFou being gay is just Disney trying to promote the SJW agenda.” I’m not even dignifying that one with a response.

5. “It’s unrealistic that Belle would just accept the Prince so quickly.” The whole theme of the story is falling in love with the person inside regardless of looks. Human or beast, he’s still the same person that Belle fell in love with.

6. “Belle is a snob because she thinks she’s better than the townspeople.” Wanting a different life for herself doesn’t make her a snob.

7. “It’s a classic fixer-upper story.” Not really.  The Beast ultimately changes himself on his own.  Belle wasn’t some nagging, controlling housewife constantly telling him what to do.  And that really shows in the breakfast scene.  Although she’s kind of grossed out by his sloppy eating, she quickly sees that he can’t really help it since he’s unable to use proper silverware, so she compromises by drinking out of the bowl so he won’t feel so embarrassed.

8. “It makes no sense for everyone in the French village to sound American/British.” IT’S A FREAKING MOVIE.

9. “It’s kind of unfair for the Beast to get redemption when Gaston doesn’t.”  Although they do have a lot in common, the Beast doesn’t have the same delusions of grandeur.  He knows he’s a monster while Gaston still thinks that he’s the greatest thing on Earth.  But while the Beast was willing to change, Gaston didn’t.

10. “Emma Watson isn’t pretty enough to be Belle.”  Again, missing the whole point about not judging people’s looks.

*mic drop*

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Favorite Actors & Actresses: 5/10 - Emma Watson (b. 1990)

“Ignoring fame was my rebellion, in a funny way. I was insistent on being normal and doing normal things. It probably wasn’t advisable to go to college in America and room with a complete stranger. And it probably wasn’t wise to share a bathroom with eight other people in a coed dorm. Looking back, that was crazy.”