embroidery-techniques

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Artist Eliza Bennett takes embroidery to an almost shocking level with her work of art Woman’s Work is Never Done.  Through a top layer of the skin in her palm, Bennett sews multicolored thread.  The embroidery pattern resembles a familiar pattern of callouses that develop in hands frequently put to difficult work.  However, beyond its initially shocking impact, Woman’s Work is Never Done also carries a significant socio-political message.  Describing the work in her statement, Bennett says:

“By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the preconceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.”

via Hi-Fructose (link takes you to their tumblr).

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Things that inspire us:

SILAÏ by Charlotte Lancelot  

“SILAÏ is the new collection from Belgian designer Charlotte Lancelot for GAN, GANDIABLASCO’s indoor brand. SILAI means “stitch” in the Indian language and represents a reinterpretation of petit point embroidery.

Inspired by the work of craftsmen Charlotte Lancelot has created a contemporary collection which aims to rediscover hand embroidered techniques, applying critical mass, use and context.

“This is a technique that people know, that reminds them of times gone by and provokes nostalgia,” outlines the designer.

SILAÏ celebrates the beauty of the age-old art of the handmade where the time, care and patience needed to make something is reflected. It is a “savoir-faire” that is being lost, because we have less and less time, we use objects which we consume quickly, that can be replaced easily.

Woven over a plastic grid, or a “framework”, the petit point are simple rapid diagonal stitching. The design of the carpets includes four types of distinct stitch that combined with each other in different ways create a beautiful harmony of colours and textures.

The result: very light-weight carpets, comfortable and with a unique design.”

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Easy, Elegant Treats: A Brush Embroidery Cookies Tutorial

Brush embroidery is a fundamental technique developed especially for cake decorating to resemble lace embroidery. Use soft to medium firm royal icing, buttercream icing or softened ganache to pipe designs onto cookies. A paintbrush is used to pull the icing inward with brush strokes to emulate stitching in embroidery. This intimidating-looking technique is in actual fact incredibly easy to master and guaranteed not to fail.

In this step-by-step tutorial, you will learn a quick way to glam up any ordinary sugar cookie with elegant brush embroidery!

Photos via Katrien’s Cakes

Keep reading

Some extreme embroidery going on here, certainly not for everyone.

From the ‘A Woman’s Work Is Never Done’ series by Eliza Bennett.

“Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid 'ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be 'women’s work’. “

Above quote taken from Eliza Bennett’s website.

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Eliza Bennett embroiders colored thread into her own hand to challenge the idea that work traditionally reserved for women is easy.  

“Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.”

Check out more of her work at http://elizabennett.co.uk/

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Olya Shamrick is an urban gypsy, writer, photographer, mixed media explorer and stylist who lives through nature, simple living standards and cultural heritage. She brings together digital photography and traditional embroidery techniques together on TLV Birdie by covering lifestyle aspects and creating unique images.

Blog // Instagram

*description provided by artist.

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Artist:

Eliza Bennett

“A Woman’s Work is Never Done”

Flesh & Thread

 2011

“Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand. By using the technique of embroidery, traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of it’s opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy. Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ancillary jobs such as cleaning, caring, and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’.”

Hillary Fayle : These are leaves that I coat in a non-toxic preservative to protect them and make them slightly more resistant to tearing. I then stitch into them using a mix of traditional and original embroidery patterns and techniques. Upon finishing, they are framed accordingly.

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Meredith Woolnough’s Embroideries Mimic Delicate Forms of Nature

Australian artist Meredith Woolnough creates elaborate embroideries that mimic delicate forms of nature like leaves and coral. “I have been collecting skeletonized leaves for as long as I can remember,” says the artist, whose “traceries” capture the beauty and fragility of nature. Woolnough uses a special embroidery technique that involves a domestic sewing machine and a base cloth that dissolves in water after the piece is complete leaving just the skeleton. In a way, her process also mimics the natural process of leaves dying and drying up which, in turn, become the subject of her work.

You can follow Woolnough on Instagram or see more of her work on Facebook. She also had an exhibition earlier this year at the Milk Factory Gallery.

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