embracing feminity

DO NOT BUY OMIGHTY

Recently I commented on @omweekend ‘ s Instagram post asking them a question. I’ve always really liked their clothes. Unfortunately for me they don’t make sizes that aren’t super tiny. Lots of stores do this but lately omighty has been on this big feminism kick. 

Most of the new clothes they have feature awesome feminist messages. I hadn’t checked their site in a while and I thought that since they had seemingly started to embrace equality and feminism, maybe that meant that they’d started making sizes that would fit someone who isn’t tiny. I looked on their website and sure enough the sizes were still the same.

 I was confused. Here they are promoting a movement (feminism) that is supposed to support and include all women And is supposed to promote body positivity for all bodies.Their shirts literally say shit about being equal and accepted Yet they somehow are unable (/unwilling) to make sizes that fit people who aren’t tiny (they have a shirt that literally says “curvy girls” on the front of it for Christs sake).  

So I got frustrated a few days ago and commented on one of their photos (keep in mind they get hundreds of comments on their posts). In a non mean or confrontational way I asked why their shirts promoted inclusivity  but their actual business didn’t seem to. I also asked genuinely if they had plans to make some extended sizes because I really did want to buy a lot of things they sell! Apparently they don’t want people who look like me wearing their clothes. They also don’t want these kinds of things being brought up on their thread because I was promptly blocked. 

It is abundantly clear to me now that there is absolutely no greater meaning behind these shirts. To omighty, the messages on these shirts’ only meaning is the money they make off of them. The actual principles mean nothing to the company. They are profiting off of a message that they don’t care about. They are actually using opposite principles to sell their clothes It seems to me that #omighty kind of just ascribes to the taylor swift/Lena Dunham exclusive feminism club which pretty much just turns the “feminism” label into a marketing tactic. A label to seem cool and edgy. beyond that, its nothing to them.  because of things like this it is losing its meaning. 

It’s ridiculous that a company that makes feminism themed clothing cannot handle one comment asking them about the principles that they claim are important to them. 

It is also curious to me that a company that claims to be for intersectional feminism constantly uses AAVE on their clothing that is mostly being pictured being worn by white models.  

omighty: please go back to making racially appropriative, miley cyrus inspired outfits and underwear covered in pictures of young Justin beiber. You clearly can’t achieve a level of sophistication above that. Click the #omweekend Tag on this post to see more horrible shit they do. DO NOT BUY OMIGHTY

huffingtonpost.com
Olympic Gymnast Danell Leyva Says Embracing Feminism Is 'Common Sense'
And he wants more Latino men to self-identify as feminists.

It’s so rare to see male Latinos in the public eye use the word “feminist” to describe themselves.

A lot of people shy away from that word. They’re not scared, they just don’t want to make anyone else upset. But I don’t care. People hear that word and they’re like “Oh, you want women to be better.” No. You’re wrong. We want people to be equal.

So was there a specific moment or conversation that led you to embrace feminism?

It was when I realized it was common sense to be a feminist. I think what helped was the fact that I’ve always been surrounded by very powerful women. My mom was the one who got me and my sister out of Cuba, by herself. My sister was 12 and I was a year and a half. We went to Peru, and we weren’t even supposed to stay in Peru for long. But we ended up staying for 6 months, so my mom obviously had to go out and look for work, so we could survive. And my sister, being 12-years-old, was the one taking care of me.

I think I realized I was a feminist when I saw the contrary ― when I saw people that didn’t have that mentality, that [saw] other people as less. I was like “what are you talking about? Everybody is the same.”

theguardian.com
Embrace feminism to improve decision-making, says Justin Trudeau
Justin Trudeau, Canada’s prime minister, has called on men and women to embrace feminism to improve decision-making in politics and business.
By Graeme Wearden

“Trudeau appointed a gender-balanced cabinet after he became prime minister in November, made up of 15 men and 15 women. At the time, he explained his decision by saying: “Because it’s 2015”

“I personally convinced a number of extraordinary women to step forward, as well as a number of extraordinary men, at a time when politics can be very very divisive.

Study after study have shown that if you ask a man if he wants to run for office his first question is likely to be: ‘Do I have to wear a tie every day?’ And if you ask a woman if she wants to run for office, her first question is usually, ‘Really, why me?’ Let’s start rewarding politicians and companies who aren’t driven by a macho approach,” Trudeau said.

Sheryl Sandberg, chief operating officer of Facebook, told the delegates that gender inequality began at a young age. “Little boys do fewer chores at home and get paid more. We assign our chores to our children in the United States so that the boys are taking out the trash; it takes less time than cleaning the dishes and they get higher allowances,” she said.

While changing mindsets can take a long time, Trudeau predicted that the citizens of 2036 will look back disapprovingly at the world today. “Even within our own society, if you look back 50 years or if you leaf through a magazine from the 70s, you see horrific sexism that is overt in a way that would be unacceptable today.

“Even today, hopefully 20 years from now, people will look at what we think is acceptable today and find it horrifically off-base.”

Read the full piece and watch the video here

More Justin Trudeau posts on Profeminist

4

I think that feminism has existed for centuries and we are not the first generation to embrace feminism and we won’t be the last. I think that there is some sort of solace to be found in the idea of joining together with people who have a similar goal as you. Just like any radical movement, as feminism used to be interpreted as, you find family, and you find relatability, and you find people with the same intentions as you fighting for the same cause as you and it brings people together. I don’t think there’s anything negative to be found about it. I think that we’re making incredible progress and I think the steps we are making in the mainstream in feminism is going to be incredibly essential for the long road we have ahead.

Just a quick little 101 for you guys because sometimes I want to do some educationing/talking. 

“White Feminism” is not an umbrella term for feminism that only embraces white women. “White feminism” is a term for feminism that is not intersectional which means that it excludes women of color, disabled women, queer women, trans women, lower class, ect. 

As I understand it, intersectional feminism embraces all women including and especially those who are women of color, LGBT, disabled, lower class, trans, or queer. 

I point this out because it is so important to not turn feminism into an oppression olympics. It’s harmful to the cause to try and decide which women have more important stories or to compare women of color to disabled women in terms of hardship or queer women to lower class women. They all face very very diverse, different struggles but they are all important facets and stories to feminism. They are all women. 

Your feminism, whatever it is labeled, should be as diverse and inclusive as possible and not prioritize the needs or stories of any group of another. I see a lot of hostility come up when people start getting angry about WOC vs. Queer women or things of that nature and both are so, so important to a diverse feminism. Remember when you are protecting, supporting, and uplifting one minority group, to do your best not to simultaneously stomp out another or hush their voices. We’re all guilty of that. As a white, queer woman I am guilty of prioritizing LGBT stories and voices as they are closest to me. That doesn’t mean they shouldn’t get priority when it’s their time but it means reminding myself that there are other women and other voices. I’ve also felt my voice as a queer woman be stomped out by other groups who prioritize their struggles.

I’ve found so far that one of the most important, simple things to do in being a feminist woman is to listen to the voices around you, even if you think you disagree with them. Listen to the women in your world, all of them. And take as much empathy as you can with you into the discussion. Understanding that this is a movement that involves all of us and is important to all of us is important. 

When writer Roxane Gay dubbed herself a “bad feminist,” she was making a joke, acknowledging that she couldn’t possibly live up to the demands for perfection of the feminist movement. But she’s realized that the joke rang hollow. In a thoughtful and provocative talk, she asks us to embrace all flavors of feminism — and make the small choices that, en masse, might lead to actual change.
—  I GAVE A TED TALK. You can watch it online. Roxane Gay: Confessions of a bad feminist | TED Talk | TED.com
2

I think that feminism has existed for centuries and we are not the first generation to embrace feminism and we won’t be the last. I think that there is some sort of solace to be found in the idea of joining together with people who have a similar goal as you. Just like any radical movement, as feminism used to be interpreted as, you find family, and you find relatability, and you find people with the same intentions as you fighting for the same cause as you and it brings people together. I don’t think there’s anything negative to be found about it. I think that we’re making incredible progress and I think the steps we are making in the mainstream in feminism is going to be incredibly essential for the long road we have ahead.