elmo tully

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Lord Grover Tully spoke for Prince Viserys Targaryen over Laenor Velaryon as the successor to Jaehaerys I in the GreatCouncil of 101 AC. When the Dance of the Dragons erupted in 129 AC, the oldlord proved loyal to his principles and King Aegon II … but he was aged then, and bedridden, and his grandson Ser Elmo defied him and had the gates barred and the banners kept close.

Later during the Dance, Ser Elmo Tully led the riverlords into battle at Second Tumbleton, but on the side of Queen Rhaenyra rather than King Aegon II, whom his grandsire had favored. The battle proved a victory—at least in part—and soon after his grandfather finally died and Ser Elmo became Lord of Riverrun. But he did not long enjoy his station; he died on the march forty-nine days later, leaving his young son, Ser Kermit, to succeed him.

Lord Kermit brought the Tullys to the height of their power. Vital and bold, he fought tirelessly for Queen Rhaenyra, and her son, Prince Aegon, later King Aegon III. Lord Kermit was the chief commander of the host that descended on King’s Landing in the last days of the war, and he personally slew Lord Borros Baratheon in the final battle of the Dance of the Dragons.
His successors ruled as best they could after him, but Riverrun was never again as prominent as during those years.

The World of Ice and Fire

Dedicated to madaboutasoiaf, for her contributions to the Muppet Tully Experience


Kermit did not remember his father well.  He had been young when Lord Elmo had ridden to war, to fight at Rhaenyra’s side—young enough that his father still spoke to him as if he were a child, though he was a man grown and newly knighted.  “When Elmo returns, Elmo will tell you such wonderful stories, all right?” his father had said, his red hair blowing in the wind.  His father always baby-talked him that way, calling himself “Elmo.”   Kermit had never known why.  He’d been three-and-ten when the war had broken out, and surely his father should not have treated him like a child.  But Lord Elmo had, and only now did Kermit realize how much he missed it.  

His father had given him another hug.  “Now be good, and heed Byrd, Kermit.  Now, smile for Elmo.  Go on, Kermit.  Smile.”  But Kermit had been unable.  He’d felt near tears, in truth.  “No smile for Elmo?” his father had asked.  “Does Elmo need to tickle Kermit?” 

Kermit had shaken his head.  He didn’t remember much of his father, beyond his red hair, but he did remember that Lord Elmo had loved tickling, and he had tickled Kermit until he’d laughed and smiled before mounting his great steed and ridden off to his death, his bastard son Oscar and his younger brother Cook at his side.

It was thus that Kermit Tully learned that life was not a song.

“Come now, Ser Kermit,” Byrd had said.  Byrd was Castellan at Riverrun, a tall and lanky man with a thatch of yellow hair and an easy demeanor.  “There’s no use being sad.  Lord Elmo would not have wanted it.”

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The World of Ice and Fire - Ser Elmo Tully

Later during the Dance, Ser Elmo Tully led the riverlords into battle at Second Tumbleton, but on the side of Queen Rhaenyra rather than King Aegon II, whom his grandsire had favored. The battle proved a victory— at least in part— and soon after, his grandfather finally died, and Ser Elmo became Lord of Riverrun. But he did not long enjoy his station; he died on the march forty-nine days later, leaving his young son, Ser Kermit, to succeed him.

Artist: Magali Villeneuve

anonymous asked:

Maybe it's just me, but do you ever find that the Tullys are kind of overrated? They don't seem to be on the same "level" as the other great houses. Even the Greyjoys, who appear to be much less respected, make for it based on sheer personality. The Tullys are just so. . .bland.

I respectfully disagree. No House with multiple Muppet lords can possibly be bland. 

Later during the Dance, Ser Elmo Tully led the riverlords into battle at Second Tumbleton, but on the side of Queen Rhaenyra rather than King Aegon II, whom his grandsire had favored. The battle proved a victory— at least in part— and soon after, his grandfather finally died, and Ser Elmo became Lord of Riverrun. But he did not long enjoy his station; he died on the march forty-nine days later, leaving his young son, Ser Kermit, to succeed him - TWOIAF

Members of House Tully: Lord Elmo Tully

Elmo Tully was short in stature but made up for it in personality. He had a greatcharisma and charmed those around him easily despite his speech being high pitched and rather exaggerated. He was very popular with women, fathering one acknowledged bastard, Tomas Rivers, but rumoured to have sired many more.

His grandfather was not so charmed when Elmo defied him during the Dance, pledging support for Rhaenyra rather than Aegon. Grover Tully was heard to have called Elmo a “little red menace” from his bed, his shouting carrying well through the castle but it did not stop those within obeying his grandson.

A little red menace he was indeed for the greens who had relied upon his support. Elmo made a striking figure when he called the banners to march in favour of the blacks, his wild red hair blowing in the breeze. He took joy in the prospect of battle and his enthusiasm and popularity pathed the way for his son Kermit to take advantage and for the Tullys to rise rather than fall after Elmo’s untimely demise.

Requested by celiatully and fat-walda