ellis and carl

I want a love like:

Ross and Rachel

Kim and Ron

Lizzie and Gordo

Fred and Wilma

Sailor Moon and Tuxedo Mask

Ellie and Carl

Zoey and Chase

The Doctor and Rose

Amy and Rory

I want the love that goes through thousand years and never gives up, the love that comes from a great friendship, the love that can go through the hard times and still bounce back because of our love, the love that can stay strong thousand of miles apart, the love that can take being universes apart and still be in love, that can take death and still love each other. I CRAVE that love.

I want a boy whose kisses make me feel alive

I want a boy who has a part that never growing up

I want a boy who would fight against with anything for me

I want a boy who could understand me without a word

I want a boy who can show me the world

I want a boy who treats me as an equal

I want a boy who helps me to make my dreams come true

I want a boy who would never give up searching for me

I want a boy who would sacrifice himself for me

I want a boy who let me teach him

I want a boy who puts my happiness before his own

I want a boy who would never leave me behind

I want a boy who always want the best for me

I want a boy who grow old with me

because I would give all of this to him.

10

By Karen Hallion Illustrations

http://society6.com/product/the-seagulls-have-the-phonebox_print?curator=rebeccamcgoran

3

Favorite Autistic Headcanons in Animated Disney Movies

Hercules (Hercules)
Peter Pan (Peter Pan)
Fa Mulan (Mulan)
Rapunzel (Tangled)
Hiro Hamada (Big Hero 6)
Vanellope von Schweetz (Wreck-It Ralph)
Milo Thatch (Atlantis: The Lost Empire)
Ariel (The Little Mermaid)
Carl and Ellie Fredricksen (Up)
Lilo Pelekai (Lilo and Stitch)
Violet Incredible (The Incredibles)
Wreck-It Ralph (Wreck-It Ralph)
Wasabi (Big Hero 6)
Anna (Frozen)
Belle (Beauty and the Beast)
Lewis/Cornelius Robinson (Meet the Robinsons)

(Feel free to ask me to give more detail on any of these headcanons, including my reasoning and personal interpretations.)

anonymous asked:

Is Ravenclaw or Hufflepuff more likely to cry at a movie? I don't imagine a Gryffindor or Slytherin crying at movies

hufflepuffs would be the ones bawling over movies with a happy ending and nobody else gets it because ‘dude moana just saved te fiti and the rest of the ocean it’s happy why are you crying?’ ‘BECAUSE IT’S JUST SO BEAUTIFUL!!!’

ravenclaws cry at people baring their souls. characters who struggle to fit in, the ones who get bullied and ridiculed at school. anything about the fear of growing up and losing yourself will bring on the waterworks. like that scene in the breakfast club where brian’s talking about wanting to kill himself? damn gets me every time

gryffindors will cry at anything based on a true story. they’ll shed angry tears over the injustice of it all and the fact that this really happened. they can’t believe these people went through so much shit and it hurts that they can’t do anything about it. anything about the holocaust will see them locked in their room for a few hours

slytherins are most upset by the death of the hopeful. the friends and beloved characters who were so full of dreams and aspirations that they never got to fulfil. the people who never got to do everything they wanted. they’ll never admit it, but the fact that ellie and carl never got to go to paradise falls together kills them every time they watch it

The Elements of a QUIET SCENE

I got a great question from @jailmom on the post “The 7 Elements of a Scene”. The question was about how that post could apply to quiet, distinctly-not-actiony scenes. I didn’t even think about writing a post like this, so thank you for the excellent observation! 

Anyway, here’s how the elements apply to a low-conflict scene, illustrated by a scene from Up.

Mr Fredricksen, Russel, Dug, and Kevin are on their way to Paradise Falls, but must set up camp for the night. Russel has tried and failed to make a tent. 

What’s at stake? Mr Fredricksen’s resolve to remain unattached to anyone.

Russel’s Goal: He really wants to be Mr Fredricksen’s friend. 

Carl’s Goal: He really doesn’t want to be friends. Thus far, he’s regarded Russel as a mildly annoying obstacle, slowing down his goal of getting the house to Paradise Falls. And since he’s stuck with Russel, he wants to keep him as a mildly annoying obstacle. Growing attached to anything would be the worst thing that could happen (he believes). 

Escalating Conflict: They’re “fighting”, meaning their goals conflict. It’s not outright of course, not an argument; they’re not even aware what’s at stake, and what the significance of the situation is. But really, the subtext is battling over what their relationship is going to be. Annoyance and annoyed guy? Or kid and grandfather-figure?

Beat One

Russel: “Awh. Tents are hard.” (Exhausted) 

Carl: “Wait, aren’t you ‘Super Wilderness Guy’? With the GPM’s and the badges?” (Grumpy derision)

Beat Two

Russel: “Yeah, but … can I tell you a secret?” (Sheepish) 

Carl: “No.” (Russel wants to share something. Carl doesn’t wanna hear it.) 

Beat Three

R: “Alright. I never actually built a tent before. There. I said it.” (Says it anyway. Honest. Mostly, sweet.)

C: “You’ve been camping before, haven’t you?” (Surprised, slightly judgmental.) 

Beat Four

R: “Well, never outside.” (Honest again.)

C: “Well, why didn’t you ask your Dad how to build a tent?” (Curious, in spite of himself.)

Beat Five

R: “I don’t think he wants to talk about this stuff.” (Suddenly concerned)

C: “Why don’t you try him sometime? Maybe he’ll surprise you.” (Helping him, in spite of himself.)

Beat Six

R: “Well, he’s away a lot. I don’t see him much.” (Explanatory)

C: “He’s got to be home sometime.” (Trying to prove that Russel can fix this on his own.)

Beat Seven

R: “Well, I called, but Phyllis told me I bug him too much.” (Now kinda sad)

C: “Phyllis? You call your own mother by her first name?” (Beginning to be emotionally involved, so covers it with contempt. Kids and parents these days!)

Beat Eight

R: “Phyllis isn’t my mom.” (Surprised.)

C: “Oh.” (Realizes he’s been wrong about him.)

Beat Nine

R: “But he promised he’d come to my Explorer ceremony to pin on my Assisting the Elderly Badge, so he can show me about tents then, right?” (innocently optimistic, hopeful. Sad.)  

C: “Hey, uh, why don’t you get some sleep. Don’t want to wake up the traveling flea circus.” (Danger! This kid is invading Carl’s closed-off little world. This must be avoided.)

Beat Ten

R: “Mr Fredricksen, Dug says he wants to take Kevin prisoner. We have to protect him! Can Kevin go with us?” (Worried)

C: “Alright. He can come.” (Relenting, though keeping up the grump act)

Beat Eleven

R: “Promise you won’t leave him?” (Hoping to rely on him, trust him.)

C: “Yeah.” (Agreement, still grouchy) 

Beat Twelve

R: “Cross your heart?” (Sleepily, one last promise.)

C: “Cross my heart.” (This is the turn of the scene, and the moment that Russel “wins” it. Because this is something Ellie said to Carl. Something that symbolizes her, part of the moment he started loving her. Saying it again signifies the turn.)

Beat Thirteen

Russel is sleeping peacefully. 

C: "What have I gotten myself into Ellie?” (Looks at his floating house, the symbol of his attachment to the past and to Ellie. Knows he’s lost the battle. Russel isn’t just an annoyance anymore.)

Turn: Well, Carl is officially emotionally attached.  

So! Scenes work no matter the level of conflict. As long as there is conflict present – two characters (or more) in opposition – the scene will work. Anyway, this was really fun to write. Thank you to @jailmom for the excellent question!