elizabeth the queen mother

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Tag yourself, founding mothers edition:

Dolley Madison, Sybil Luddington, Deborah Sampson, Elizabeth Hamilton, Elizabeth Monroe, Molly Pitcher, Phyllis Wheatley, Betsy Ross, Abigail Adams, Martha Washington, Mercy Otis Warren and Eliza Lucas Pinckney.

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I’ve asked you to join me because I made a decision regarding the coronation committee, which is that I would like my husband to be the chairman of that committee.

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Princess Elizabeth of York (Queen Elizabeth II) makes her first appearance on the balcony of Buckingham Palace with her parents, The Duke and Duchess of York, and the Duke’s parents King George V and Queen Mary on 27 June 1927. 

The Duke and Duchess had been separated from their daughter for six months whilst they embarked on a royal tour focused on Australia and New Zealand. 

“I am looking forward more than I can say to the baby & a good rest. I have missed her all day & every day, but am so grateful to you & Mama for having been so kind to her. It will be wonderful to see her again.” - The Duchess of York in a letter to her father-in-law, George V, dated 12 June 1927.

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This program commemorated the coronation of Elizabeth Windsor, as Queen Elizabeth II of England, on June 2, 1953. At the same ceremony, she assumed the title of ‘Sovereign’ of most Commonwealth nations. To this day, the Queen holds sixteen regnal titles and dozens of honorifics.

The program features photos of the Royal Family, poems, songs, an overview of coronation procedures, and a history of monarchal and imperial coronations in Britain. It comes to us as part of the Barbara Denison collection. Ms. Denison was present at the coronation and was a lifelong collector of Royal Family memorabilia. 

The Flame of Hope is an eternal flame that honors Sir Frederick Banting’s discovery of insulin, as well as all those who have been affected by diabetes. Simultaneously, it serves as a reminder that insulin controls diabetes but does not cure it; ultimately, it stands for the hope that a cure will soon be found.

The Flame will only be extinguished when a cure for diabetes is developed. The team responsible for finding the cure will be flown in to do so.

The Flame of Hope was kindled before 4,000 spectators by Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother on July 7, 1989.

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Queen Elizabeth, The Queen Mother, (wearing the Greville Tiara and the Greville Emerald Neckalce) and Princess Margaret (wearing the Poltimore Tiara) attend the Ballet Performance in honour of the Shah of Iran at the Royal Opera House in London, 1959.

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8 June 1492 | The death of Dowager Queen Elizabeth Woodville

From Elizabeth Woodville: Mother of the Princes in the Tower by David Baldwin:

Elizabeth died at Bermondsey Abbey nearly two months after making her will, on Friday 8 June 1492. Her body was conveyed by boat to Windsor on Whit Sunday, 10 June… accompanied by Prior Ingilby, Dr Brent, Edward Haute, her second cousin, and two gentlewomen, one of them her husband’s illegitimate daughter, Grace. The wooden coffin was taken ‘prevely’ (privately or secretly) from the Thames to the Castle and was received there at eleven at night by a single priest and a clerk. There was no ringing of bells nor formal reception by the dean and canons of St George’s Chapel, and she seems to have been interred almost immediately without any form of ceremony. The Marquess of Dorset, his half-sisters Anne, Catherine and Bridget, Edmund de la Pole (the slain Earl of Lincoln’s brother) and other relatives reached Windsor on Tuesday, and that evening the Bishop of Rochester conducted the services of dirige and requiem mass. The Queen was prevented from attending by her impending confinement; but the King, and other senior peers and churchmen were all conspicuous by their absence, and one of the heralds present was shocked by the general modesty of the proceedings. His comment that ‘ther was nothyng doon solemply for her savyng a low herse suche as they use for the comyn people with iiij wooden candilstikks abowte hit’ and that there was ‘ther never a new torche, but old torches, nor poure man in blacke gowne nor hoods, but upon a dozeyn dyvers olde men holdyng old torches, and torches ends’ requires no elaboration, and it is unclear why the Dean of Windsor, who was present, played no part in the services himself. It is sometimes suggested that Elizabeth had requested a simple and inexpensive funeral out of a deep sense of piety and that was accordingly what she was given: but she would have been aware that a deceased’s estate normally bore these expenses, and that queenly obsequies were beyond her means. Elizabeth may have thought of piety in terms of poverty, although few great noblewomen would have chosen austerity or thought money and their faith incompatible. Margaret Beaufort, who was as pious as she was powerful, used her great wealth to found chantries and university colleges and to support numerous religious ‘good causes’, and when she died in June 1509 her total assets, in plate, jewels and rich materials still amounted to £14,724. Her elaborate funeral, which cost £1,021, was a far cry from Elizabeth’s impoverished burial when, it seems, Dorset paid the 40s in alms which was distributed after mass out of his own pocket. Requests for a modest funeral were a mark of humility, largely ignored by contemporaries who felt that the deceased should be buried in accordance with his or her rank in society, and it is difficult to believe that she who had once been Queen of England had insisted upon this dismal and unqueenly ending. Be that as it may, in the course of her life Elizabeth had mourned the deaths of all five of her brothers, all but one of her seven sisters, four of her five sons and two of her daughters, and she may have felt that there was little to detain her in this world when her own time came.