elements organizer

welcome to positivelyYOI!

you know that one YOI artist/writer/cosplayer/etc that you absolutely lose your mind over and want to shower with affection? is there someone you think might be in need of some encouragement? what about that event organizer you really want to thank?

well now you can, stress-free, with positivelyYOI!

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at its core this blog is dedicated to spreading positivity in the yoi fandom. the aim is to provide a stress-free method to show appreciation for the many people, elements, organizations, parts etc that make this fandom what it is.

all compliments posted will be anonymous, so you wont have to worry or feel awkward if you have anxiety!

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yes! this blog requires outside participation in order to function, so you can help by spreading the word! and depending on how much traffic this gets, i may need a co-admin in the future as well!

everyone deserves a few kind words  (*•̀ᴗ•́*)و ̑̑ 

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Elemental Air • Alchemy necklace • Air element • Witchy • Four elements • Copper necklace • Copper pendant

Hand-made copper necklace featuring the alchemical symbol for the air element. This piece was made from upcycled copper, which has been oxidized and later on sealed with organic spruce resin.

Own it today!

The historicity of Satine Kryze

I feel kind of awful discussing Satine Kryze after so many weeks of Maul but, well, when in Mandalore…

Duchess Satine Kryze is pacifist the ruler of Mandalore first introduced in The Clone Wars episode The Mandalore Plot. Her initial design was drawn from an unused McCaig concept for The Phantom Menace, but it has also been stated that Cate Blanchett was a key influence in her overall design. (given the appearance of Governor Pryce in Rebels season 3, it’s apparent that Blanchett is someone’s favourite over at LFL.) Blanchett’s role as Queen Elizabeth I was particularly drawn on, Satine’s key costuming borrowing many late Tudor/early Elizabethan elements, and certain parallels between the two women’s lives. 

L: Elizabeth as portrayed by Cate Blanchett with Robert Dudley (Joseph Fiennes) in Elizabeth. Preparing to be escorted to her incarceration in the Tower of London at the order of her sister Queen Mary I (’Bloody Mary’). R: Satine Kryze being rescued from her imprisonment by Obi-Wan Kenobi in Lawless.

Satine, as a young woman, lived her early years constantly at threat during the Mandalorian Civil War, her pacifist ideology at odds with ‘true’ warrior-like Mandalorian ways. Eventually peace was brokered, and Satine ruled over the New Mandalore even as violence, danger and oppositional factions brewed. In a way this could be seen to draw from Queen Elizabeth I’s tumultuous childhood: first as a child out of favour with her father King Henry VIII, being the child of ‘treasonous’ Anne Boleyn, then as a protestant young woman in the reign of her Catholic half-sister Queen Mary I. In this time Elizabeth was raised as a figurehead for Protestant rebellion, which eventually led to her detainment in the tower of London despite her claim of innocence. Throughout her reign Elizabeth faced a number of incidents of opposition from catholics and the Roman Catholic Church, though her attitude was one of pragmatic compromise in many aspects of religion. These parallels are loose but notable in their broad brushstrokes. 

Original Amidala sketch by Iain McCaig for The Phantom Menace

When designing Amidala for The Phantom Menace, McCaig was working through a ‘Space Nouveau’ aesthetic, borrowing elements from the works of Mucha, the Pre-Raphaelites and retro-futuristic romance of the first half of the twentieth century. Technology and nature in harmony. This design, when stripped back for animation to be practical, emphasised those now notably familiar Star Wars lines that borrow from Japanese fashions, whilst still retaining the Romantic aspects. the shapes of Satine’s headpiece echoes the increasingly elaborate ruffs and wired collarettes that grew exponentially throughout the fashions of the sixteenth century. The headpiece and gown are also heavy with symbolism: shell earrings and embellishments, the repeating petal shapes in her sleeves, skirts and tabbards as well as the literal lillies woven into her hair and headpiece loudly communicating her pacifism. She is visually placing herself within her own principles for all to see, decrying the past violence of her people, and the relative simplicity of this costume despite its ceremony (block colours and controlled embellishment - though the fabrics are clearly indicated to be silks) saves her message from being drowned out. These symbolic embellishments have been a popular aspect portraiture for centuries to communicate and sway power and impressions, in portraits of Elizabeth I the symbolic choices appear in their multitudes from props to tiny embellishements to the very styling of her hair. In the famed Rainbow Portrait (below) of Elizabeth I - a fantasy portrait painted late in her reign, but depicting a young newly crowned queen dressed for masque - embroidered eyes and ears show that she is a queen that Sees and Hears all. A queen in absolute control of her land. 

L & C: McCaig’s design reworked and streamlined by Killian Plunkett to work both within The Clone Wars aesthetic and for the character. This is a great example of concept recycling and adaptation for character, as when this design was originally selected as a base design for Satine, it wasn’t known that she would be quite so active and ‘dynamic’ as she ended up in the episodes. [X] R: The Rainbow Portrait, 1600-02, attributed to Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger. 

This organic silhouette at odds with the old is also visible in Satine’s landscape. Mandalore was designed drawing heavily from the Cubist movement in the most literal way. Their cities are built inside cubes within their destroyed environment. Sharp angles occur in everything from buildings, hair, food and ice cubes, floor texturing. Interspersed throughout are the diamond shapes and lines of Mandalorian armour, shifting into an Art Deco boundary between the Cubist harshness and Satine’s Nouveau romance. This mid-design point means that Satine is not entirely in opposition with her environment - her world and her people. These diamond shapes are present in the cut of her open oversleeves. She visually acknowledges Mandalore’s history whilst representing the new. (Equally, this could be seen in that her costume - despite it’s ceremony - holds little impediment to action and self-defence when necessary.)

The main plaza on Mandalore, clearly showing the Cubist influenced design, complete with detailed mural depicting the war with the jedi, and repeating diamond shapes.

Satine’s next notable costume looks a lot like she just walked out of an ‘80′s fantasy film and it is fantastic. The romance is heavy in this look with the long, soft lines and the muted pinks, particularly as she and Obi-Wan investigate the Death Watch on the industrial Concordia. She wears a shortened surcoat that mimics the cut of a man’s doublet, a fashion that was favoured throughout the sixteenth century, and appeared in both French and Italian fashions (Italian styles fell out of favour in much of Europe in the latter half of the century as Spain became increasingly influential.) This fashion has appeared, heavily embellished, in a number of portraits of Elizabeth I, reflective of her dichotomy as woman and sovereign, as expressed in her famous address at Tilbury, 

I know I have the body of a weak, feeble woman; but I have the heart and stomach of a king 

Satine’s ‘80′s adventuring costume.

The harsh cutaway style of Satine’s surcoat also mimics late eighteenth century frock coats and equestrian fashions, clearly communicating to the audience that is Time For Adventure! even whilst calling back to the late Tudor fashion for skirts cut to reveal heavily embroidered petticoats. Again, echoes of those Mandalorian armour diamonds are introduced in this cut, whilst organic elements are retained in shell detailing and the floral line of her chemise. Satine, too, must address her dichotomy of being in her very appearance.

L: Portrait of Mary Stuart (aka Mary Queen of Scots), c. 1559, Francois Clouet. R: Portrait of a Noblewoman, c. 1580, Lavinia Fontana. Mary Stuart is shown in a French doublet-styled bodice, whilst Fontana’s portrait is in the Italian giuppone style. The possibility of a Mary Stuart influence in Satine feels particularly apt given their mutual martyrdom. Mary, a devout Catholic who also lived a tumultuous life at odds with her country, was executed by Elizabeth for her movements to depose the heretical English queen. 

Satine’s final costume - in both its forms - is by far her most interesting and most historical. Its basic silhouette is a slimmed down take on the late Tudor/early Elizabethan bell shaped gown using the verdugle, or Spanish farthingale. As I mentioned above styles were influenced by politics, and the Spanish styles were favoured from the marriage of Katharine of Aragon to Henry VIII until late in Elizabeth I’s reign, when French fashions were favoured due to threatening war with Spain. (Anne Boleyn was known to have been bold in her favouring of French fashions as a couriter in the time of Katharine of Aragon, though styes were generally mixed.) Obviously Satine is not wearing a farthingale - it would be impractical, and her gown is later stripped away. But this is a politically influence shift in style: the symbolism in dress is stripped away, the flamboyance is gone. I have joked in private that maybe Satine borrowed the Naboo royal dressmaker, but there is little doubt that her ceremonial costume was designed with an eye to the wider galactic stage and what would be recognised as regal garb. This is a much stricter silhouette - upright, austere though still richly (but subtly) embellished. It is a design turned inward. Those Cubist elements are creeping into the lines of her skirt as she is taking a stand for her people and for New Mandalore.

L: Duchess Satine Kryze in Shades of Reason. C: Elizabeth I when a princess, c. 1546, attributed to William Scrots. This early fashion for oversleeves is also evident in Satine’s first ceremonial costume, as is the split skirt. R: A Young Lady Aged 21, Possibly Helena Snakenborg, Later Marchioness of Northampton, 1569, the British School (a personal favourite.) Here you can see shoulder rolls and the broad neckline with delicate open infill. 

Again, we are seeing a dichotomy between the feminine and masculine, her sleeves and stand neck calling back to those borrowed from the pourpoint doublet, the sleeves studded and bracciali, shoulder rolls, taking on the look of armoured pauldrons. The broad neckline introducing that diamond shape yet again and placing it directly against petal shapes of the stiff stand collar mimicking the guimpe, typically soft infill, now strengthened and yet vulnerable and exposed. Satine is strong in her beliefs, but the ground beneath her feet is vanishing rapidly. 

As this arc progresses, the costume is ripped, stripped away and softened. Embellishment - such as her jewels and belt - are removed, her hair is loose, her skirt shortened. It is here that those Cubist elements become even more apparent in the front tabbard-like section of her skirt, echoing the split-skirt Tudor fashion. Interestingly, these stylistic elements were favoured by Elizabeth when she was young, unstable in her position as princess and then, later, queen. 

Satine Kryze, deposed, imprisoned and the worse for wear.

It is relevant to notice at this point Satine’s colour palette. Her main colour is blue - particularly this deep prussiany blue - feminine whilst also strong. The colour of Mandalore. She and her people are not part of the war, but at this point she is caught - personally - between the personal vendettas of Maul and Obi-Wan, both of whom are sliding into bloody reds and browns. She is the middle ground, trapped. Pinks and reds emerge in her costumes at various points when she is knowingly heading into danger, the pinks of her Adventuring costume, the red of Coruscant costume when she is on the run in The Duchess of Mandalore. Satine’s primary ceremonial gown has elements of purple and greens - she is in power, and in control. A ruler in her prime. But in this final arc she is blue and stripped of everything but her principles, and yet perhaps at her most Mandalorian? Considering Padme’s watery funeral gown, it appears that blue is the colour of martyrdom. 

Next Time: The path unfollowed: the heroics of Padme & Leia

Last time: Darth Maul and the fashion of Nemesis - Part II

The 78-year-old Jaffer says she and the other actresses did their own stunts. ‘And I got feeling from a lot of the crew members that they didn’t think it was right women of my age to be doing that sort of thing. You know, sometimes they’d come up and say, oh, he shouldn’t ask you to do that. And I would say why? And they’d say, well, because you’re an older woman. I did it, and I have to say, I enjoyed every minute of it.’

Jaffer says it was a box office risk for Miller to cast older women to play such ferocious characters. But she says she jumped at the opportunity. 'The roles that one is offered at this age, quite frankly, you’re either in a nursing home, you’re in a hospital bed dying, you’re suffering from dementia, or in fact, in two cases, I was offered two characters who’d actually died and come back to life,’ she says. 'So when this role came along, I thought well, I won’t get another chance like this before I die, and that’s why I took it. It was absolutely wonderful. Wonderful role.’

George Miller says in this hero myth, women of all ages were an organic element. He plans to bring them back in more Mad Max sequels.

10,000 BC pgph 34

On the other hand, language becomes the new form of expression … The substance involved is fundamentally vocal substance, which brings into play various organic elements: not only the larynx, but the mouth and lips, and the overall motricity of the face. Once again, a whole intensive map must be accounted for: the mouth as a deterritorialization of the snout (the whole “conflict between the mouth and the brain,” as Perrier called it); the lips as a deterritorialization of the mouth (only humans have lips, in other words, an outward curling of the interior mucous membranes; only human females have breasts, in other words, deterritorialized mammary glands: the extended nursing period advantageous for language learning is accompanied by a complementary reterritorialization of the lips on the breasts, and the breasts on the lips). What a curious deterritorialization, filling one’s mouth with words instead of food and noises. The steppe, once more, seems to have exerted strong pressures of selection: the “supple larynx” is a development corresponding to the free hand and could have arisen only in a deforested milieu where it is no longer necessary to have gigantic laryngeal sacks in order for one’s cries to be heard above the constant din of the forest. To articulate, to speak, is to speak softly …  The form of expression, as language, also crosses a threshold.

from paragraph 34, 10,000 BC. Translated by Brian Massumi

Altar Tips
  1. You don’t have to get a definitive altar- You can set up an altar only when you need one. You can keep your things in a box.
  2. Wardrobe altar- You can set up your altar in your wardrobe, in case you don’t have space or you are not allowed to have an altar in another place
  3. Bathroom altar- This is also for the case you don’t have liberty to have it somewhere else and you need privacy. This is good for non-definitive altars.
  4. Travel altar/ mini altar- You can create your own version of your altar for travelling, by making it with natural things and in a smaller proportion to fit your bag or you can buy one. There are some cute mini altars available on internet.
  5. Outdoor altar- This one is good for connecting better with nature. Also it’s a good way to the non- definitive altar, because obviously if you leave your things outside someone might take it or the wind and the rain might destroy it.
  6. Kitchen Altar- if you are a kitchen witch, you can set up an altar in your kitchen. It can be with the tools and the position as you wish or you can go the some other traditional set up. 
  7. Garden- If you are into gardening and herbs you can create your whole garden in positions and add tools that represent that place as a sort of sacred/ altar place to perform your magic. Or you can get a recipient and create a mini version of it. The set up and the tools can be as you feel it’s correct for your work. 
  8. Wicca altar- This is the “traditional” set up, that you will find in most wiccan books:

      9. Other types:

  • Divide the tools into feminine (left); masculine (right), here you can use whatever you want and the set up can be as you wish.
  • Seasonal altar: decorate with the fruits, colors, and symbols that best represent the season

What to use in an altar:

  • Cloth
  • Candles
  • Feather
  • Incense/ incense holder
  • Crystals
  • Herbs
  • Pentacle
  • Images
  • Athame/ sword/ knife
  • Bowl/ chalice
  • Cauldron
  • Wand/ staff
  • Book of shadows/ grimoire
  • Flowers/ fruits (extra)

How to organize:

4 elements traditional tools:

  • South: Fire: masculine: orange, red- Athame, sword, candle
  • North: Earth: feminine: green, brown- pentacle
  • East: air: masculine: yellow- feather, incense
  • West: water: feminine: blue- bowl, chalice, cauldron

To represent the gods or spirits:

  • Use symbols
  • Use images
  • Use candles. Can be white. Can be gold for the masculine and silver for the feminine

Tools that can replace the expensive ones:

  • Fire: citrine, amber, kitchen knife, banana, cinnamon, ginger, candle, fire symbol
  • Water: bowl, cup, water, jasmine, lavender, lapis lazuli, blue quartz, aquamarine
  • Air: incense, flute, wand, stick, staff, branch of a tree, feather, tree leaves
  • Earth: handmade pentacle, salt, dirt, apple, flower, black tourmaline, onyx, obsidian

Why have an altar:

  • To cast spells
  • To perform rituals
  • To meditate
  • For prayers
  • To use it for crafting: witch bags, witch bottles, herbal medicine

jessicafuckingjones  asked:

Sarah HOW DO YOU BRAINSTORM PLOTS my mind is a mess of half-baked ideas that wouldn't work

Plots, I can’t help you with so much. Plotting isn’t my forte. But I can maybe help you get half-baked ideas to a fully baked souffle, and the way you do that is by fucking up a lot of souffles to be honest, but I’m here to offer my advise on how you gain quite a lot by fucking up those souffles for a while

SO: margotkim’s patented Idea Development Help Guide That Might Be Useful?™

aka COOL ID-BASED IDEA FLESHED OUT UNTIL IT MAKES SENSE

This is literally the only method I have for coming up with ideas solid enough that I can plot the out: I have one image I want to work towards, and then I work out all the things that I have to figure out for it to happen.

STEP ONE: HAVE COOL IMAGE OR SCENE, DON’T WORRY ABOUT LOGIC

  • and I mean really don’t worry about logic or reason or even if anyone else will think it’s cool, that’s just gonna get in the way at this point. This is working on the image of the kind of strange stories you tell yourself as you wait to fall asleep. 
  • So I have this image I’ve been thinking about of a magic fight that takes place in an old looking gothic church with no ceiling, shattered stain glass, ivy growing up. The columns that lead up to where the ceiling should be lead up into nothing but pure white, outside the windows are pure white, it is clear this place is outside the world we know. Up around the place where the ceiling should be, there’s a winged black shadow. Underneath there’s a man in hospital scrubs in a wheelchair with a shotgun. 
  • Or I have this other idea that I’ve been thinking about, where two characters face each other in a room, and all I know about them is that they are on the same side, they knew each other, but one of them is younger and a wunderkund who messed something up tremendously, and the other is older and their teacher and she has to figure out how to punish this other character who is simultaneous a good person and someone who did something very very wrong. 
    • This image is bookmarked with a line of dialogue from the Walking Dead video game where your character says, “You’re not a bad man, but what the fuck are we supposed to do now.” I bring this up because fiction often inspires other fiction in strange and indirect ways, and you should always pay attention to your influences to use them as scaffolds for your own ideas, which can often mean being inspired to veer off deliberately in the opposite direction. Never underestimate how inspiring it can be to have a model to work against. 

So that is some free association in two different ways there, but it’s super vivid to me. I know what these scenes looks like, and I understand and find interesting the emotions involved. I just don’t why they are happening. 

and actually hold on a sec.

STEP ZERO: BUT WHERE DO YOU GET THE IMAGE

  • I’m sure you have an image where you’re like “badass badass badass” or “SO EMOTIONAL OH GOSH” or “these two characters are culminating their love, also who are they”, but you might think that that isn’t the basis for a story. And listen. You gotta put yourself in the place where you trust your brain enough to follow the random bullshit it spits out. 
  • I used to draw this line in my head between “respectable story ideas” and “random terrible daydreams that make me very happy but no one else will understand”, and that was a bad call because the ideas that make you passionate and make you want to think about them all night are the ideas you should nurture
  • and look
  • the majority of these images start with things like: 
    • LOOK AT THIS COOL LADY ON A MOTORCYCLE WITH WINGS AND ALSO SHE HAS A SWORD AND THE SWORD IS POISONED. 
    • or maybe: WOULDN’T IT BE COOL IF THERE WAS A PLANET THAT WAS COVERED OCEANS BUT THERE WAS ONE CITY THAT WAS ALL METAL AND IT WAS SINKING INTO THE OCEAN EVERY DAY. 
    • or: I LIKE THE MONSTERS OF PRINCESS MONONOKE AND I JUST READ A BOOK ON GIANT SQUIDS, HOW CAN I COMBINE THESE
  • because the images that reach past your idea of what a good story is supposed to be to squeeze your heart are the images that drive you to create
  • the ideas that give you utter joy but you think are untranslatable to other people are the ideas that are worth the time to translate
    • writing is a long act of trying to get a reader to see something you are creating out of nothing. 
    • it’s an act of conjuring
    • it’s a pain in the ass 
    • regardless of whether it’s an academic paper or a twelve novel epic fantasy series
    • so it might as well be a pain in the ass you’re passionate about. 

for me, the best ideas are also embarrassing. if you don’t feel a little awkward about explaining it to someone, it isn’t intimate enough to you to be a story that no one but you could tell. 

okay? moving on.

STEP TWO: HAVING ESTABLISHED THE IMPORTANCE OF BELIEVING IN THE IDEAS YOU THINK ARE COOL BECAUSE THEY ARE COOL AND MORE THAN THAT THEY ARE IMPORTANT BECAUSE YOU ARE IMPORTANT, WE MUST KNOW ANSWER THE QUESTION OF HOW THE FUCK THAT IMAGE CAME TO BE, SO ASK YOURSELF QUESTION AFTER QUESTION

  • church fight scene image
    • for me, the man is the clear entry point into this image, which has almost too many elements to work out. the man is human
      • when working with genre work, a rule of thumb I find helpful: the genre elements should support the character and themes you want your characters to explore
      • if working with people is easier for you than working with genre elements (and genre btw can be romance, magic, mystery, anything, we’ll use genre as a shorthand for “the elements that determine where in the library a book gets shelved”), then build your characters and then build genre elements off that
      • if working with genre elements is easier for you, reverse engineer a character that thematically suits your genre elements that you want to work with
      • realistically you’ll develop both elements together, each organically pushing the other in new directions
      • but it’s easier to start somewhere
      • so let’s start with the man 
    • who is the man
      • why is he in the wheelchair?
        • is he in a wheelchair because of something within the story you are telling or as something that happened seperate of the story you are telling
        • and as a corollary to think about: what about this man did he start this story with and what did he gain/lose over the course of this story
      • where did he get a shotgun?
      • if the man is in scrubs, does that mean he was in a hospital before?
        • was he a patient? doctor? nurse? tech? criminal? 
      • is he equipped in anyway to handle this problem?
      • is he going to be played by oscar isaac?
        • spoiler warning: yes. he is going to be played by oscar isaac
      • what does the man feel at this moment? 
      • what has the man done to get here?
      • how does the man’s external situation reflect his internal? 
        • what can the scuttling shadow thing reflect? why does it matter that he’s in a strange unworldly church? why is he handling this situation with a gun?
        • we sometimes talk about THEMES as this thing that just exists for english majors to write essays about, but THEMES are tremendously useful to writers as well. they ask you “what is this story about?” in a way that helps you construct a world that allows you to explore your answer
        • for example: this story will be about loneliness. the main character will suffer from loneliness. the antagonist will exacerbate their loneliness. the side characters will provide different views on loneliness. the solution to the problem will in some way address loneliness. 
          • which could be something like: a man who isolates himself because he doesn’t want to risk emotional connection with people suffers tremendously from loneliness which only causes him to isolate himself more as he feels less and less capable of approaching people. the monster is something that snatches people from the world without a trace. by the end, the man might very well be the last person on earth, in a place that’s the last place on earth, and now utter isolated, he has to fight the monster alone. 
          • this is a super loose construction, but it’s a beginning 
    • then reach outside the image
      • first, reach outside the image altogether, back into the world of your own head and ask questions like: what kind of plots do I find interesting? what kind of works does this image remind me of? what connections am I making that I don’t unerstand yet why I’m making them? 
        • most useful question for me, because I’m a character girl girst and foremost: what kind of characters do I always love? I’ve got like five stock characters I love in every situation, which one works the most interestingly here? The Reserved Good Man Who Is Punished For Doing The Right Thing? The Badass Character Who Is Secretly A Dork But Also Secretly Has A Super Dark Past? The Normal Person Who Does Their Best Amidst Forces Far More Powerful Than Them? 
          • I plug in different characters I like and see how the image changes
          • I see which one makes me immediately want to know more
    • second, reach outside the immediate image you have to explore what’s on either side of it
      • what happened one minute before this image? and one minute before that? and one minute before that?
        • what happened ten years before that? 
        • how do you link those two times?
      • if the man wins, what’s the next hour look like? 
        • what about if the monster wins?
        • what does it mean in this story to win? 
      • what characters that matter aren’t in this picture?
        • did someone give the man a shotgun?
        • did someone unleash the monster? 
        • is the man fighting for someone besides himself? 
        • who does the monster love, if the monster loves?
    • and literally keep going
      • just ask question after question after question after question after question, because one question will suggest the next, and each answer will create new questions, and the questions that you think to ask will be as informative as the answers you come up with
        • for example for this story, towards the end I started asking questions about the monster winning, who does the monster love, who unleashed the monster, and the wording made me realize that I’m interested in a monster that’s sympathetic
        • but my image is dependent on a horrific monster
        • the combination of horrific and sympathetic, combined with the desolate beauty of the church, is pointing me towards a specific theme and mood that will help me define my story 
  • two people at a table scene (I’ll do this one quicker, I promise) 
    • for human drama, I think instantly on two character types I both love, and how can I put them against each other
    • or what’s a dynamic that I’ve always wanted to see done a different way
      • in this case, I immediately think “the young viewpoint character of any action/genre show who is good at stuff without trying, and their rival/mentor who works really hard at stuff and puts effort in but doesn’t have the same natural talent” 
      • and this is a case of reaching outside the image to the box of things I know I like, because often times making a story is bringing together:
        • new inspiration, and 
        • old loves
    • and then when I think of the trope that interests me that works in this moment, I think of where I have seen that trope, and the ways I have wanted it to play out differently
    • then I think about the setting that would bring this trope out best
      • and this decision is influenced heavily by the things I like
      • the things I like are spies and bureaucracy (babe, I fucking LOVE stories about bureaucracy, which is weird, I know, but is also the thing that Me, Myself, and I bring to this story that most other people won’t)
      • and so this story is now about a younger rising star spy who disobeyed orders on a mission because she thought she knew the right thing to do better than anyone else, and the older more trained and experienced spy who has to deal with her
        • an important element of my story from the beginning is that both women are good people but the younger one has done something Wrong, and to avoid false drama, it has to be something genuinely bad 
        • so her breaking orders on a mission resulted in friendly fire where the younger one accidentally shot and killed her ally
        • and for the sake of drama, let’s say the person she shot and killed was the older woman’s good friend
          • and there’s the beginning of a plot

IT’S SO LONG, I hope this is helpful to you, and here’s the cliffnotes:

  • release yourself from your own judgment and explore the images, tropes, and ideas that make you truly excited
  • and make sure that you are really, really excited about the idea
  • because that excitement is what’s going to power the aggressive interrogation of your own idea that lets you create a truly thought-out, living world 
  • and once you have asked yourself all these questions about your image, you’ll find that your questioning leads you to the themes you find powerful and the actions you find exciting, and this will help you coalesce all these questions and answers into a plot that combines and drives themes, actions, genre, and character  

dashky  asked:

Hello! I admire your art. May I ask you, how would you describe a diference between a morphology and a topography? I think you are capturing it very well in your photos, but I am not sure how to put it into words.

Interesting, @dashky and you are right.  Both refer to this natural arrangement of diverse elements organizing themselves functionally and aesthetically.  It’s the way some of these particular arrangements are organized, how they fill the space, that makes them more or less appealing to the eye and interesting in our perception.  Topography and morphology study empirical data and both base their observations on form.  They are the objective study of form.  My Topographic Studies would be the subjective study of these natural arrangements, those that catch a viewer’s attention by their very singular appearance, their shapes and dimensions, the colors, the mix of tones, the feeling of scale.  

There is something intrinsic to vastness and natural immensity that is profoundly moving, revered by people,  the way time carved its imprint on the landscape throughout the ages and for billions of years. That, to me, resonates more like topography.  Morphologies evolve as well but on a different timeframe and at a different scale.   They exist in an evolving topography and one wouldn’t come to be without the other.  I see topography as the study of an environnement inhabited by different morphologies, both evolving in a continuous interaction.  Ultimately, if I photograph a gorgeous human being in front of an immense conical volcano,  one naturally occurs to me as topography and the other as morphology.   Thank you for your interest into my work.

anonymous asked:

Any pta headcanons for the fell & swap bros?💓

(I sadly dont know much about pta, only what i heard around tumblr. Im not from america, and we do have something simliar, but they mostly only help organize little thing and stuff like that.)

UF Sans: Hes a salty one when it comes to PTA. But a lazy salty one. He will throw in a few sarcastic remarks here and there “yeah, sure helen thats the “best” way to do it” and a few insults “wow, this lemon bar tastes like dog food. and i know my dog food very well.” But he will mostly just nap at the meetings and maybe pull a few pranks on some of the , in his opinion, worst members. Be nice or prepare for mustard in yur cofee, and mousetraps on your chair.

UF Papyrus: Hes in his element. Organizing things and an outlet for his kind of short temper at once. He isnt cruel though, he wont hurt anybody. Except for with his words. There will be a lot of members leaving after he joins.

US Sans: HOOO BOI! This energetic happy ball isnt made to sit still and talk about the next fundraiser in a small, boring room. But he loves to help so he will still try his best. Just dont get onto his bad side, you cant imagine how creepy his grin can turn, and he is a very fast talker, you wont even have a chance to say something back.

US Papyrus: This lazy slob takes more smoke breaks then all the other members together. And he doesnt really care, he only joined because Sans wanted him to. Just dont talk shit about vaccines or anything similiar, hes a science nerd. He will smack proof of how wrong you are into your face before you even finish your sentence. And then go back to sleep. He is to lazy to actually deal with that. But expect sudden honey covering your chair and bag if you insist that you are rigth. Dont mess with science facts before his eyes.

The Wild Youth

Preeetty sure Gil is deliberately being a jerk here, but it’s not a bad question, is it? The Jägers he’s asked have said they don’t know, which might just mean it’s a rather personal question they’re suddenly being asked, or might mean they really don’t.

The Jäger candidates are most likely drawn from the people who ride with them. A demographic Old Man Death describes here for us. Young men who didn’t care what happened to them.

There’s an element of gangs or organized crime, as well as the obvious military ones, to the Jägerkin. From the family terms they throw around to the internal code of honour. The Jägerbrau itself has elements – although the way it works is by necessity not design – of hazing, initiation, or even Russian Roulette. You suffer excrutiating pain and the chance of death to be part of this group.

Tarvek’s asking a different question. Not “why would anyone become a Jäger?” but “Why would a smart educated person become a Jäger?”

Jorgi’s answer is flippant, but maybe there’s some truth in it too. Vole still wanted to burn down the world.

And, fifteen? Even if he’s counting from when he was old enough to first understand his father, or perhaps to when he left home rather than to when he was offered the brau, it doesn’t sound like he was very old.

So you have a demographic of people in their teens or early twenties, people who don’t care much what happens to them and don’t expect anyone else to either. The kind of people who would be drawn to crime or gangs, because they’re looking for somewhere to belong and half-expect to die young anyway.

What the Heterodyne offers – what might be too embarrassing to tell a nosy Spark asking nosy questions – is the promise that they will be loved and valued, even in a harsh, possessive way.

Vlad made Jägers as soldiers and companions (according to the Secret Blueprints). Heterodynes are isolated, the sole Masters in their town of Minions. They don’t have friends. But Jägers get some of the leeway of court jesters, their unquestionable loyalty and dependency meaning they get a licence to tease. Dimo’s “get your own pants” attitude didn’t strike me as odd, but as something Agatha could probably put an end to if she got mad enough about it to command him. As long as she doesn’t, he’s allowed to play (and how much of “borink” as a description of Bill and Barry means “they wouldn’t play with us”?)

Jägers are wildly attention seeking. They clown for each other, for outsiders, and probably for their Heterodynes. As long as it doesn’t interfere too much with work, amusing your Heterodyne is a good thing.

Heterodynes are hedonistic, usually. I think a lot of what I’m trying to say here is… Heterodynes want to have fun. Often considerably more than they actually want to conquer a thing. They chose people they could have fun with, people who shared their idea of fun. Heterodynes are gleefully destructive and so are Jägers. Whether they were angry – looking to burn down the world – or just reckless and uncaring, they could come away covered in someone else’s blood and smiling. Soldiers who can do the work but take no pleasure in it are no fun to ride with.

My absence lately

I’ve had a few asks about why I’m not as active lately as normal so I’m going to just clear that up.

My life’s been nuts lately. I transferred to a new job where I now work in pediatrics which is very much out of my element. My organization I work for has also started making mandatory classes where I have long distances to travel. I’m now working almost 50 hours a week on top of trying to plan a wedding, raise a child that is going through a lot herself. We are house hunting, and trying to keep up with where we are living now. I’m honestly exhausted both physically and mentally.

The other reason is because I had received some really nasty asks and backlash from fellow tumblrs over things that weren’t warranted so I chose to step back a bit for my sanity.

I hope this clears everything up. Don’t hesitate to send a message or ask as I still check those daily.

In better news I am almost at 1500 followers so once that is reached I will be posting a celebration that I have not yet done!