electrodomestics

7

Before I start speaking (or writing, tho), I want you to know that most of the links I’ll use as sources may be in Spanish, because it’s information given by our newspapers. Sorry for that, but I’ll do my best in translating the most important quote on the source as well linking that quote with the article in the newspaper.

On February 12th venezuelan students took over the streets in order to protest pacifically against our current Government. Nevertheless (though not surprisingly) their response over the protest was with violence. Before going on the events, I’ll explain why are we protesting?

Since the last year our consumer prices have been increasing. Only in 2013 it reached over 56 percent, making it impossible for our country to import and get foreign currency. Not only that, the inflation also had increased the prices from different electrodomestics, clothes, books and even food. Our President, Nicolas Maduro, had introduced a new and more complex system of currency control, but experts and critics says it’s another devaluation of our own currency in disguise.

Another good reason is the shortages of basic goods. Venezuelans HAVE to get in lines so we can obtain toilet paper, sugar, flour, chicken, butter and our dearest Harina Pan, corn flour we use to make Arepas. We are almost fighting to get food and thoroughly thinking what are we going to use when there is no more toilet paper. What is more, Maduro is  imposing a lower prices control even though the inflation, making impossible for the supermarkets to keep full inventories.

And, the worst reason, is the violent crimes. Venezuelans are incapable of going to the streets without exposing their lives. With the only propose of burglarizing a venezuelan slaughter another everyday. A recent study put the homicides’ rates 79 per 100.000, making Venezuela one of the most insecure and violent countries in the World. The murder of our Miss, Mónica Spear, a venezuelan who deeply loved this country, just woke our senses and maybe that’s when we said we can’t take this shit anymore. This is all I can summarize from all the facts that made us to take the streets this last week.

Trying to stop us, claiming that we are being violent, the Government sent their Army Forces to apprehend the students. By that meaning the own Government is ignoring the laws from the Venezuelan Constitution (and I’ll summarize):

Art. 61. Every person has the right for freedom of thought and manifest it, unless it constitutes a crime.

The Army, the people who are suppose to defend their equals, the venezuelans, those who are in danger, are kicking and striking the students (this is a youtube video so be careful), holding them under false charges, shooting them (90 under arrest and 40 gunshot wound), and even murdering them.

What is worst from this situation is that the Government is trying to cover it. No Venezuelan television media is reporting the protest as it never happened. An international tv channel, NTN24, was pulled out from Venezuelan TV because according to politics it was “distortioning the information” when all it was doing was telling the truth. Not only that, and as Twitter just confirmed, the Government disabled the picture and video service from the social network so we couln’t see and pass to each other all the crimes they are committing for almost a day. They are saying to the world that the Army Force don’t use weapons towards students (If you saw the video, you can even hear the gunshots in the distance).

I know you can’t do anything to help, but please PASS THIS. Any reblog can help, because what venezuelans need is the world to know that what we are living is not Democracy, but a covered Dictatorship. They are trying to hide it so they can get away with it.

And we can’t let them hide that fact as nothing.