eileen-gray

“To create, one must first question everything.”

“To create, one must first question everything.” - Eileen Gray

How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior explores the collaborations, materials, and processes that have shaped the modernist interior, with a focus on specific spaces from the 1920s to the 1950s and is on view now.

[Installation view of How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior. The Museum of Modern Art, New York, October 1, 2016-April 23, 2017. © 2016 The Museum of Modern Art. Photo: Martin Seck]

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Eileen Gray

#tbt to a retrospective of the work of the Anglo-Irish designer Eileen Gray, which opened in February 1980, four years after her death. Gray had often been left out of design histories in spite of her extraordinary career, which ranged from experiments in furniture to groundbreaking architecture. One of her greatest achievements in the latter field was E-1027, a late-1920s seaside house on the French Riviera that was, as the press release for the exhibition noted, “one of the first truly radical modern buildings in France.” Nevertheless, as the years passed, Gray’s contribution to the field was marginalized and her legacy minimized within the male-dominated world of architecture and design—something this exhibition sought to challenge. The installation comprised numerous examples of her furniture design, with photographs and drawings providing an overview of her work in architecture. (MoMA’s current exhibition How Should We Live? Propositions for the Modern Interior includes numerous examples of Gray’s furnishings.)

See installation views of the original 1980 retrospective, read the out-of-print catalogue, and more.