ehrlichman

We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news.

Did we know we were lying about the drugs?
Of course we did.

—  John Ehrlichman, White House Domestic Affairs Advisor (1969-1973)
You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or blacks, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders. raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
—  The Former Nixon Domestic Policy Chief (John Ehrlichman)

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”The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

- John Ehrlichman, Nixon’s central domestic advisor

I watched 13th, by Ava DuVernay (producer of Selma), at the IFC a few days ago, and it made me aware of so many wrongs in both our politicians and prison systems. Prison is the newest incarnation of slavery, and the “War on Drugs” effectively was invented to implement it. Drugs should be a health issue, not a crime issue, and the “War on Drugs” was specifically designed to target POC, and send them long sentences in prison to anguish in both physically and psychologically damaging environments instead of rehabilitating them. To add to that, many American industries and corporations fund prison and profit off prison populations, and prison labor is one of the largest and cheapest (almost free) ways to run a farm, ranch, or factory in sweatshop-like conditions. 

Please check out this documentary if its showing in a theater near you; I also believe it is on Netflix.

A Nixon adviser admitted the war on drugs was invented to criminalize black people

John Ehrlichman, a former adviser to President Richard Nixon, said the war on drugs was invented to criminalize black people and suppress the radical left, according to an article published by Harper’s. While this doesn’t reveal that much new information, the full quote and admission is so shockingly blunt it crashed Harper’s website.

Look, we understood we couldn’t make it illegal to be young or poor or black in the United States, but we could criminalize their common pleasure. We understood that drugs were not the health problem we were making them out to be, but it was such a perfect issue that we couldn’t resist it.
—  John Erlichman, White House counsel to President Nixon, revealing the racist origins of the War on Drugs.
The Architect of the “War on Drugs” Tells the Truth

“You want to know what the war on drugs was really all about?” Ehrlichman asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

John Ehrlichman, (1925 - 1999) Advisor to President Richard Nixon and the man who started the Federal Government's “War on Drugs”. Quoted in a 1994 interview.

We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
— 

John Ehrlichman, who served as domestic policy chief for President Richard Nixon

This is an incredibly blunt, shocking quote — one with troubling implications for the 45-year-old war on drugs. 

The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
—  John D. Ehrlichman, White House Domestic Affairs Advisor for the Nixon administration
The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White Hose after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
—  John Ehrlichman, Watergate co-conspirator & Nixon aide, via @adamjohnsonNYC