ehrlichman

The current president of the United States lies. He lies in ways that no American politician ever has before. He has lied about — among many other things — Obama’s birthplace, John F. Kennedy’s assassination, Sept. 11, the Iraq War, ISIS, NATO, military veterans, Mexican immigrants, Muslim immigrants, anti-Semitic attacks, the unemployment rate, the murder rate, the Electoral College, voter fraud and his groping of women.
 
 
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The big question now is not what Trump and the White House are saying about the Russia story. They will evidently say anything. The questions are what really happened and who can uncover the truth.
 
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I was most saddened during Comey’s testimony not by the White House’s response, which I’ve come to expect, but by the Republican House members questioning him. They are members of a branch of government that the Constitution holds as equal to the presidency, but they acted like Trump staff members, decrying leaks about Russia’s attack rather than the attack itself. The Watergate equivalent is claiming that Deep Throat was worse than Haldeman, Ehrlichman and Nixon.

You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin. And then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities,“

Ehrlichman said. "We could arrest their leaders. raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course, we did.
—  John Ehrlichman, aide to Richard Nixon
Today I Learned #5

“You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin. And then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.” -John Ehrlichman, one of President Nixon’s advisors.

In short, the war on drugs is and always has been founded on racism and attempts from the Conservative party to control anyone who thinks differently than them. I highly recommend watching Adam Ruins Everything’s video on weed and the history and motivation behind it being illegal.

We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news.

Did we know we were lying about the drugs?
Of course we did.

—  John Ehrlichman, White House Domestic Affairs Advisor (1969-1973)

anonymous asked:

Did Richard Nixon ever meet George W. Bush?

Yes. George H.W. Bush was Ambassador to the United Nations and then Chairman of the Republican National Committee while Nixon was President. In Bush’s excellent book, 41: A Portrait of My Father (BOOK | KINDLE), he described his first meeting with Nixon:

“My first time meeting Richard Nixon came when my father brought me with him to an ecumenical church service that the President held in the East Room…The idea of a church service in the White House struck me as unusual. So did the President. When I shook hands with him, he seemed somewhat stiff and formal. I had voted for Richard Nixon, but I didn’t feel very warm about him.

Part of the problem was that Nixon’s style of leadership did not seem to fit the times. In the late 1960s and early 1970s, Americans were grappling with race riots in major cities, the assassinations of Martin Luther King, Jr., and Bobby Kennedy, an unpopular war in Vietnam, and a changing culture in which drug use was becoming prevalent and women were demanding their rightful place in society. A country looks to its leaders to set a mood, and the rattled nation needed a President to project optimism, unity, and calm. Instead, Richard Nixon came across as dark and divisive. His White House, led by senior aides H.R. Haldeman and John Ehrlichman, seemed cold and conspiratorial. And that was before the news broke about secret tapes and enemies lists.”

Incidentally, in one of the most fascinating and overlooked stories in Presidential history, George W. Bush actually went out on an awkward and all-around terrible blind date with President Nixon’s oldest daughter, Tricia. Bush’s father had tried to play matchmaker, and George W. reluctantly agreed to go on the date when some of his flight school buddies bet him $50 that he didn’t really have a date with the President’s daughter. George W. Bush wrote later that the date was pretty disastrous – he took the President’s daughter to a place called the Alibi Club, at one point he spilled red wine all over their dinner table, and Tricia Nixon actually had to ask him not to smoke when he lit a cigarette as they were eating. However, President Nixon was out of town, so George W. didn’t meet him that night when he “pulled up to the White House gate in my parents’ purple Gremlin, which was outfitted with Levi’s jean seat covers.”

You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or blacks, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders. raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
—  The Former Nixon Domestic Policy Chief (John Ehrlichman)

white on black on red

marker, white-out, ink pen on sketchbook paper


”The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

- John Ehrlichman, Nixon’s central domestic advisor

I watched 13th, by Ava DuVernay (producer of Selma), at the IFC a few days ago, and it made me aware of so many wrongs in both our politicians and prison systems. Prison is the newest incarnation of slavery, and the “War on Drugs” effectively was invented to implement it. Drugs should be a health issue, not a crime issue, and the “War on Drugs” was specifically designed to target POC, and send them long sentences in prison to anguish in both physically and psychologically damaging environments instead of rehabilitating them. To add to that, many American industries and corporations fund prison and profit off prison populations, and prison labor is one of the largest and cheapest (almost free) ways to run a farm, ranch, or factory in sweatshop-like conditions. 

Please check out this documentary if its showing in a theater near you; I also believe it is on Netflix.

We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
— 

John Ehrlichman, who served as domestic policy chief for President Richard Nixon

This is an incredibly blunt, shocking quote — one with troubling implications for the 45-year-old war on drugs. 

Look, we understood we couldn’t make it illegal to be young or poor or black in the United States, but we could criminalize their common pleasure. We understood that drugs were not the health problem we were making them out to be, but it was such a perfect issue that we couldn’t resist it.
—  John Erlichman, White House counsel to President Nixon, revealing the racist origins of the War on Drugs.
…but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities.We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
—  John Ehrlichman, former Nixon Advisor.
The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
—  John D. Ehrlichman, White House Domestic Affairs Advisor for the Nixon administration
The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White Hose after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.
—  John Ehrlichman, Watergate co-conspirator & Nixon aide, via @adamjohnsonNYC 
The Architect of the “War on Drugs” Tells the Truth

“You want to know what the war on drugs was really all about?” Ehrlichman asked with the bluntness of a man who, after public disgrace and a stretch in federal prison, had little left to protect. “The Nixon campaign in 1968, and the Nixon White House after that, had two enemies: the antiwar left and black people. You understand what I’m saying? We knew we couldn’t make it illegal to be either against the war or black, but by getting the public to associate the hippies with marijuana and blacks with heroin, and then criminalizing both heavily, we could disrupt those communities. We could arrest their leaders, raid their homes, break up their meetings, and vilify them night after night on the evening news. Did we know we were lying about the drugs? Of course we did.”

John Ehrlichman, (1925 - 1999) Advisor to President Richard Nixon and the man who started the Federal Government's “War on Drugs”. Quoted in a 1994 interview.