egyptian tombs

Tomb of Nefertari, QV66, Valley of the Queens

Tomb of Nefertari: The descent, lower east wall

There is the image of the winged uraeus, protecting the queen’s cartouche with its wings The black jackal Anubis reclines on a shrine, a sash tied around his neck and a golden flail supported by his hind leg. Below the goddess Nephthys can be seen.

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Rare Egyptian Bronze Cat Nursing Kittens, Late Dynastic, C. 712-343 BC

A cast bronze fragment of a piece that was perhaps a cuff or applique.

The ancient Egyptians, rather uniquely among the world’s civilizations, had an obsession with cats, both tame and fierce, large and small. Cats were domesticated to help protect crops from pests in Cyprus or possibly Mesopotamia (it is difficult to interpret the archaeological record on this matter for a variety of reasons), but the Egyptian’s love of cats seems to have gone above and beyond that of their contemporaries. The cemetery at Hierakonpolis includes a cat skeleton in a pre-Dynastic tomb (c. 3700 BC) that had a broken left humerus and right femur that seem to have been set by a human and allowed to heal before that cat’s ultimate death.

The first illustration of a cat with a collar comes from a 5th Dynasty (c. 2500 to 2350 BC) Egyptian tomb at Saqqara. Cats were the most frequently mummified animal in Egypt and there were multiple feline goddesses, including the domesticated cat-form Bastet. Bronze statues like this one may have been direct offerings or appeals to Bastet.

Hieroglyphic decorations from the temple of the 18th Dynasty female pharaoh Hatshepsut (r. ca. 1479-1458 BCE) at Deir el-Bahari, on the west bank of the Nile opposite Luxor.  Here, Hatshepsut’s stepson, co-regent, and eventual successor Thutmose III (r. 1479-1425 BCE) is shown presenting offerings to the falcon-headed god Horus.  Photo credit:  Przemyslaw Idzkiewicz.

Languid Lounger | If ever an animal was born to run, it’s the cheetah. People have marveled at this fastest of land mammals for thousands of years. Egyptian tombs and rock temples show representations of the cheetah, and many ancient cultures used the cheetah for its hunting prowess, much the way falcons are used in many countries to accompany hunters. The cheetah has adorned the courts of kings, queens, and emperors, and its amazing grace and beauty still captive the world today. (photo: Paul Manaig)

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Women cry during the funeral for those killed in a Palm Sunday church terrorist attack in Alexandria Egypt, at the Mar Amina church, Monday, April 10, 2017. Egyptian Christians were burying their dead on Monday, a day after Islamic State suicide bombers killed at least 45 people in coordinated attacks targeting Palm Sunday services in two cities. Women wailed as caskets marked with the word “martyr” were brought into the Mar Amina church in the coastal city of Alexandria, the footage broadcast on several Egyptian channels.
(AP Photo/Samer Abdallah)

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Lamenting Mourning Women
Tomb (TT55) of Ramose
c. 1411-1375 BCE, Thebes.

The dwarf Seneb and his family, from the Tomb of Seneb (G 1036)

This statue of the dwarf Seneb and his family was found in a tomb in the Western Cemetery of Giza, next to the tomb of Perniankhu. Seneb worked in the royal palace associated with the royal wardrobe, and was also Chief of the Dwarfs in the Palace, his position made him rich, as it is known that he owned thousands of cattle. This is one of the most beautiful group statues of the Old Kingdom, he is shown sitting cross-legged, with his hands joined across his chest. His wife sits to his left, holding him with her hands, and we can see a slight smile on her face. She wears a long dress with sleeves, and a wig. Their children can be seen standing below Seneb’s crossed legs preserving the composition of the piece, as if Seneb’s legs were hanging down, and adding to the sense of symmetry. Old Kingdom, 4th Dynasty, ca. 2520 BC. Now in the Egyptian Museum, Cairo. JE 51280.

People have marveled at this fastest of land mammals for thousands of years. Egyptian tombs and rock temples show representations of the cheetah, and many ancient cultures used the cheetah for its hunting prowess, much the way falcons are used in many countries to accompany hunters. The cheetah has adorned the courts of kings, queens, and emperors, and its amazing grace and beauty still captive the world today.

Intense face off by Paul E.M.